first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe current economic crisis is offering many people the “opportunity” to change jobs and career fields. The American Association of Community Colleges has joined with organizations across the country to provide new directions in employment specifically for people over 50. (Listen to the story at Nat’l Public Radio) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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first_imgThe Speedvagen Cross Machine has been around for a little while now, and we covered it at NAHBS a couple years back. The new 2012  Speedvagen Cross Machines you may have been seeing at the races recently have been updated a little bit, and were available in a few different colorways. However, the most exciting option is what Speedvagen calls “surprise me.” This is one of those. Surprise! Now with more gold!More pics of the bikes and gold bits, plus a rare look inside Vanilla Cycles’ workshop during the build (!!!), after the break… What you’re seeing here is Sacha White and friends working on the 2013 Speedvagen Road Machines. This pic only shows a little part of the shop, but apparently it’s where a lot of the magic happens. Keep in mind these aren’t lugged, fender-clad, racked-up Vanillas we love. They’re Speedvagen branded, race-spec bikes. In all, thirty-three 2013 Speedvagen Road Machines will be produced. Thirteen of those owners got the memo, and chose “surprise me.” I can’t wait to see the finished product!Now, lets get back to the bike at hand. Above is the 2012 Speedvagen Cross Machine. Twenty frames were produced, only four were of the “surprise me” flavor. This is one.Sacha apparently happened across some gold bricks in the back of his new armored truck, which were clearly put to good use on the dropouts. Yes, it’s real gold.Speedvagen offers this different and sometimes mystery finish option exclusively through Coat, Vanilla’s in-house paint company. The in-house nature of the paint work allows for some crazy color coordinating, like some matching Paul Components cantis for example.Kudos to Bob Huff for the fantastic photography, and the entire Vanilla Workshop for all their hard work.last_img read more

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first_img View Comments Despite the world being put on pause, Andrew Rannells has had a busy year. In addition to transforming his Modern Love essay into an episode for the Amazon series of the same name, supporting the release of The Boys in the Band and trying to make his dreams come true with a Hart to Hart reboot, Rannells is back in a musical with Ryan Murphy’s screen adaptation of Broadway’s The Prom. Andrew Rannells Star Files Paul Wontorek & Andrew Rannells James Corden, Nicole Kidman, Andrew Rannells and Meryl Streep in The Prom (Photo: Netflix) Rannells likened the process of preparing for the movie version to that of a stage show. “We had a really traditional musical theater rehearsal,” he said. “I think that’s the time when the cast really bonds.” Rannells stars in the film alongside Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman and James Corden as four publicity-hungry actors determined to make a small town in Indiana more inclusive. “In a lot of ways, by the time we got to set, we were already a tight group. The thing that I noticed is that sometimes when you’re filming something and they say ‘cut,’ all of the actors sort of scatter. Nicole, Meryl, James and I really spent a lot of time just chatting.”Rannells finished filming The Prom in March prior to the coronavirus crisis shutting things down. On Show People, the actor talks about suddenly being in quarantine. “As the months went on, it became very clear that there were going to be productive days and there were going to be days that were not productive,” Rannells said. “We have to forgive ourselves for having those bad days. I’m taking opportunities as they come…Not to say that I’m sitting here and letting things happen to me, but the white knuckling of ‘and then I’ll do this’—that always backfires on me. I think you just have to be as prepared as possible to receive opportunity. I’m just trying to stay open to possibility right now.”In addition to checking The Book of Mormon original cast group chat and bingewatching Ozark, the Tony nominee said he has been having a lot of phone catch-ups during downtime. “One night, I was sitting by myself watching TV, and Patti LuPone called me—just to like, check in,” he said. “It’s not like anyone is spared from this, so Patti and I had a conversation that was like, ‘Well, this sucks.’ It was really great.”Watch the full Show People interview below.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 33:27Loaded: 0.50%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -33:27 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions offenglish, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. last_img read more

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first_imgPhoto courtesy Roeland Park Police.A security fence at Granada Park in Roeland Park stopped a vehicle from plowing into the city’s skateboard facilities on Thursday.Roeland Park police say that brake failure led to the incident, which saw a black sedan plow through a metal fence and come to a stop with its front wheels hanging over the skate park.“These type of accidents are rare,” said Police Chief John Morris, “however the curb line, slope of the grade, and fence were instrumental in making this a minor incident.”There were no injuries in the accident.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Wall Street Journal: Recent research into how emotions change with age may be able to help people lead healthier and longer lives and bring about new treatments for depression in the elderly.Like people’s bodies, emotions change over time. Older people for the most part have far fewer negative feelings, such as worry and stress, than do younger people, studies show.The elderly learn to disentangle themselves from feelings of negativity and seem to focus more on present situations that bring pleasure, rather than on the future, researchers say. They also tend to process negative information less deeply than positive information.By contrast, positive feelings such as enjoyment and happiness change very little from the time a person is in his youth until old age.Read the whole story: The Wall Street Journal More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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first_imgChildren who have neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy or epilepsy are no more likely to be vaccinated against influenza than youngsters without these conditions, despite the increased risk for complications from flu these children experience. Moreover, health care providers may not be familiar with the increased risk among these patients to effectively recommend influenza vaccine.Those are the findings of a study by a research team from the University of Louisville and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published online today in the journal Vaccine.Michael J. Smith, M.D., is an associate professor in the UofL Department of Pediatrics and a pediatric infectious disease specialist with University of Louisville Physicians. Smith is lead author of the study that is the first to estimate the rates of flu vaccination among children with neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders (NNDDs). LinkedIn Share on Twitter Email Pinterestcenter_img Share Share on Facebook “Our research shows that influenza vaccination in children with NNDDs is comparable to vaccination in healthy children – but both rates are suboptimal,” Smith said. “More education about the need for annual influenza vaccination is needed, both for parents and health care providers.”Overall, 2,138 surveys were completed by parents of children with at least one high-risk condition of any kind. Of these, 1,143 were completed by parents of children with at least one NNDD and 516 by parents of children with more than one NNDD. In the survey of providers, 412 physicians participated. The researchers worked with Family Voices, a national advocacy group for children with special health care needs, and the American Academy of Pediatrics to recruit survey participants in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.Overall, 47 percent of parents reported that their children had received or were scheduled to receive seasonal flu vaccine; among the group of NNDD parents, the rate was only slightly higher at 50 percent.The major driver to have a child vaccinated was not the presence of an NNDD, however, but the presence of a chronic respiratory condition, although several studies show that children with NNDDs are at increased risk of complications from flu. According to a 2013 study in the journal Pediatrics, one-third of reported pediatric influenza-related deaths between 2004 and 2012 in the United States occurred in children with NNDDs.“The reasons for the increased severity of influenza among these children are uncertain,” Smith said. “We do know, however, that an NNDD, intellectual disability, was the most common NNDD associated with pediatric deaths during the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic. A better understanding of the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors that influence flu vaccination of children with NNDDs such as intellectual disability is needed.”Parents who did not vaccinate their children were asked why. More than one-third of the 1,140 respondents – 38 percent – said they had concerns about how the vaccine would affect their child. Another 32 percent expressed concerns about the safety of the vaccine.Among the 412 physicians who participated, 74 percent recognized that children with another NNDD, cerebral palsy, were at higher risk from flu but other NNDDs were not so highly recognized as posing risk: epilepsy at 51 percent and intellectual disability at 46 percent.last_img read more

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first_imgResearch suggests that children begin to tell lies somewhere around ages 2 and 3, and studies have shown a correlation between children’s theory of mind and their tendency to lie. Psychological scientists Genyue Fu of Hangzhou Normal University in China, Kang Lee of the University of Toronto in Canada, and colleagues wanted to see if they could find causal evidence for a link between the two.The researchers first conducted a hide-and-seek task to identify children who hadn’t yet started lying. The children were shown a selection of stickers and were asked to pick their favorite one — they were told that they could only keep the sticker if they successfully won 10 candies from the hide-and-seek game. In the game, the child was told to hide a candy under one of two cups while the researcher’s eyes were closed. The researcher then opened his or her eyes, asked the child where the candy was hidden, and chose whichever cup the child pointed to. Thus, the child could only win the candy by lying to the experimenter about its location.A total of 42 children who never lied – who told the truth about the location of the candy on each of the 10 trials — were selected to continue with the study. The children, who were around 3 years old, were randomly assigned to complete either theory-of-mind training or control tasks focused on quantitative reasoning.The theory-of-mind training included the standard false-contents task, in which children were shown a pencil box and asked what they thought was inside. When it was revealed that the box didn’t actually contain pencils, they were asked to reason about what other people would think was in the box. The goal of the training was to teach kids that people can know and believe different things — that is, even though the child has learned the true contents of the box, someone else would probably believe that the box contained pencils.The children completed the training tasks or quantitative tasks every other day, for a total of six sessions. After the sessions were complete, the researchers again tested the children on the theory-of-mind tasks and the hide-and-seek tasks.As expected, children who received theory-of-mind training showed improvement on the theory-of-mind tasks over time, while the children in the control group did not.More importantly, the children who received the theory-of-mind training were also more likely to lie in the hide-and-seek task compared to those in the control group. And this difference held over a 30-day period.While the findings don’t shed light on the specific components of training that underlie the effect, the researchers believe their findings provide concrete evidence for a causal link between theory of mind and social behaviors like lying.“By increasing their sensitivity to mental states and engaging them in reasoning about false beliefs, we enabled young children not only to quickly apply their newly acquired knowledge to solve a problem in a social situation but also to continue to do so more than a month later,” Lee and colleagues write. “Taken together, these two findings also suggest that children were not just mechanically memorizing what they were taught in the ToM training sessions; rather, they were able to consolidate the knowledge and use it adaptively to solve a social problem they were facing.” Share on Twitter Pinterest Email Share on Facebookcenter_img Share LinkedIn Kids who are taught to reason about the mental states of others are more likely to use deception to win a reward, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.The findings indicate that developing “theory of mind” (ToM) — a cognitive ability critical to many social interactions — may enable children to engage in the sophisticated thinking necessary for intentionally deceiving another person.“Telling a lie successfully requires deliberately creating a false belief in the mind of the lie recipient, and ToM could provide an important cognitive tool to enable children to do so,” the researchers write.last_img read more

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first_imgOceaneering has been awarded a technology development contract by Statoil.The contract provides for the development, manufacturing, testing, and mobilization of a self-contained, battery-powered work class remotely operated vehicle (E-ROV) system deployed on the seabed.The system will interface with Oceaneering’s onshore Mission Support Center via a 4G mobile broadband signal transmitted from a buoy on the water’s surface, without a surface vessel required onsite.“We are pleased Statoil has given us the opportunity to develop a revolutionary, battery-powered work class E-ROV system. This award provides opportunities for continuous improvements and developments that will create increased value for both parties. We will use our Oceaneering eNovus work class ROV and new technology to supply the required battery power and communication links needed to support the project,” said Erik H. Sæstad, vice president and country manager for Oceaneering in Norway.Development, manufacturing, and pool testing will start immediately at Oceaneering’s workshop in Stavanger, Norway. An offshore mobilization test of the system is scheduled for May 2017.During the test, the E-ROV system will be deployed and recovered from a Statoil-operated IMR vessel at the Troll field in the North Sea. The system will perform specified subsea operations while Oceaneering maintains continuous, uninterrupted control from its onshore Mission Support Center in Stavanger.last_img read more

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first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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first_imgThe criminal justice system needs to catch up with the rest of society and change its ‘stigmatising’ attitude towards mental health, starting by getting rid of outdated language, the head of the Crown Prosecution Service chief has said. Max Hill QC, director of public prosecutions, called for change shortly after revised guidance was published for prosecutors on how to deal with the 20% of its cases that involve victims, witnesses or defendants with mental health issues.Hill was delivering the Howard League for Penal Reform’s annual Parmoor Lecture, entitled ‘Are defendants with mental health conditions treated fairly by the criminal justice system?’ Max Hill QC wants change in law and practice to ensure those with mental health conditions are treated fairlyHe said: ‘We, as a society and as a service, are changing and we are recognising the importance of mental health as well as physical health. But criminal justice has not adapted. It has not moved forward with us. It is stigmatising and it is in need of change’.Prosecutors have been told not to refer to ‘mentally disordered offenders’. However, Hill said ‘the simple fact that the law still uses outdated terms such as “lunatics” (Trial of Lunatics Act 1883) is one clear sign this isn’t just about policy and practice, it is about bringing our legislation up to date’.Hill said the defence of plea or insanity was another area ‘characterised by outdated and stigmatising terminology’.The DPP backed a defence proposed by the Law Commission of ‘not criminally responsible by reason of a recognised medical condition’.Closing his speech, he said criminal law had a ‘long way to go’ to ensure those with mental health conditions in the criminal justice system are being treated fairly.Hill stressed that he was not suggesting the CPS stop prosecuting people with mental health conditions. ‘What we need to be doing is balancing our approach and ensuring that those with mental health conditions, and I’m including victims and witnesses here as well, are treated fairly and proportionately. This is about encouraging the criminal justice system to engage in a debate which, for wider society, is already in full flow.’last_img read more

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