first_imgCulprit’s been teasing the Croz Blade disc brake aero road bike for quite a while now, but they’re finally rolling off the line. We nabbed one of the first production bikes for a quick test before it had to join the demo fleet at Sea Otter.Quick refresher: The Croz Blade is a switch hitter, letting you run TRP’s integrated rim brakes or any disc brake. That’s the attention grabber, but the frame itself has plenty to boast on its own: It’s stiff and fast and reasonably good looking, particularly if you opt for one of the darker graphics packages (my opinion). Even the components, which are designed in conjunction with and made by Trigon, are really nice. While founder Josh Colp hasn’t had a chance to do full wind tunnel testing on the frame, my test rides were in all manner of brutal wind conditions and it was damn fast.With just a couple weeks in the office, the test had to be damn fast, too. The bike had to be built from scratch first, which isn’t usually the case with review bikes. After wrapping up our review of their Arrow One road bike, we ended up keeping the frame as a long term test mule and putting our own bits on it. That group was stripped and awaited install on the Croz Blade. So, this gave us the rare opportunity to weigh each and every bit of the frame and Culprit’s house brand components.Once built, it was off to Florida for a week of coastal flatland riding…UPDATED: 130mm dropouts available, plus photos of bike with rim brakes and more added at bottom of post.FRAME, COMPONENT & BIKE WEIGHTSA size 58 frame with hardware (bottle cage bolts, derailleur hanger and seat collar) came in at 1,214 grams. The fork with a very long uncut steerer is 463g without the cable cover (you’ll see).Culprit’s frames come with their own seatpost (228g), stem (146g) and handlebar (204g). It’s worth noting that Trigon, who manufactures Culprit’s components, also makes parts for some of the top brands in the world and all of these performed quite well.Put it all together with Culprit’s bar tape, 2012 SRAM Red (10-speed), Prologo saddle, Token disc wheels wrapped in Maxxis tires with TRP rotors and Bengal mechanical calipers and you get a 16.4lb  (7l43kg) bike without pedals. Not too shabby for an aero bike with cheap mechanical brakes and deep clincher carbon wheels.DETAILS & INSTALL NOTESThe fork has a mostly UD carbon finish with woven sections at the base of the steerer tube for reinforcement. The backside of the crown is shaped to make the rim brakes flush with the design. If you’re running discs, a cover hides those mounts and the cable.Disc mounting tabs are minimal, and the use of a spacer on the lower mount lets them all but disappear if you’re running rim brakes. The fork blades are thin but quite stiff.The chainstays house cable entry/exit ports, rim brake mounts and Di2/EPS battery mounts. The recesses on the inside edges are for brake pad clearance.All cables and hoses are run internally, and there are plugs/ports for electronic wiring, too. It’s a simple swap to go from mechanical to electronic.Alloy dropouts face the outsides, giving the skewer a stronger clamping area to dig into, and they’re easily replaceable. Like the fork, the disc mounts are pretty minimal, with the rear one hidden behind the seatstay. If you weren’t running discs, most riders wouldn’t even notice the mounts. Hub spacing is 135mm, with adaptive dropouts for 130mm non-disc brake wheels…pics at bottom of post.Culprit’s handlebar has cable tunnels and grooves, making a very nice, round package once it’s taped. The small indent just in front of the shifter mount provided a nice shape for the outside of my palm. His bar and stem are both very, very stiff when sprinting, but they also seemed to damp vibration well enough.All put together, it’s a pretty good looking bike. Head angle on the top three sizes (58 tested, the largest they make) is a race ready 73º. The included seatpost has three positions, which really helps make this bike suit a variety of riders. Set it back and ride like Lemond or push it forward and this could be a great triathlon bike.Even with a full 1.5″ tapered headtube, the frontal profile is fairly sleek. Then the line is run through the cover, which holds it close to the top of the crown. It looks good, but creates another tight bend, giving that section of housing a tight “S” bend. On the bottom, the housing pops out pretty low, putting more bends and tension in the line and making it difficult to feed it straight into the Bengal caliper’s stop. Different mechanical calipers (TRP Spyres come to mind) might have a better angle, but this really illustrates why hydraulics are the way to go here.The rear brake’s assembly was a bit easier, but this cable required installation before inserting the fork. Check the pics of the head tube further up and you’ll see that being able to reach into the frame and guide the housing out of the hole at the top is the easiest way to do it. The full length housing did create some cable drag, another ill remedied by going to hydraulics. I take the time to mention all this because not everyone will pony up for hydros…the bike will work fine with mechanicals, just choose some really slick cables and housing. RIP Gore Cables! Just as I did with the Arrow One, I came away impressed by the Croz Blade. My only real complaints were during installation, once I had it on the road, they disappeared. Josh has been helping develop bikes for others for years, and it shows in the ride quality.Perhaps you’ve noticed I haven’t mentioned the disc brakes yet. They’re an aside. Get good brakes and braking performance should be good. The Bengals were acceptable, but by no means the best mechs I’ve ridden – stopping power was adequate for Florida’s flat roads, but I’d want SRAM’s new hydros if I were heading to the mountains. The point of offering disc or TRP’s TTV cantilevers is simply to be choice, but that novelty will wear off and shouldn’t be the selling point for this bike.Instead, I’d say the rock solid ride and seemingly impressive aerodynamics are the qualities I’d appreciate mile after mile. And, if I were into triathlon (I’ve done a couple), this would be a great choice for something to ride and train on everyday, then slap some aero extensions on it for race day and move the saddle forward.If you get a chance to demo a Culprit, I’d recommend giving it a whirl.UPDATES: Another problem with mechanicals (depending on model) is potential heel clearance. Granted, I wear a size 47/13US, but something to be aware of. Honestly, I never really noticed any rubbing, but everyone’s riding style is different.More pics of the cable routing. Like the Arrow One, this bike is stiff. Really stiff, particularly at the headtube and bottom bracket. Stand up and hammer, crank the bike from side to side, or just perform the ol’ shimmy-the-handle-bar-and-watch-for-flex test. Give it your worst, and I bet you’ll find the same thing I did. It’s rock solid.Combined with the deep-ish carbon wheels, the bike rolled along with that hollow carbon hum so common on triathlon bikes with full disc rear wheels. Not quite as loud, but present. And the overall feel was one of a tri bike’s ruthless efficiency, except with road geometry. Crit racer geometry, but road geometry nonetheless.My route in Florida revolves around Ormond Beach’s Loop Ride and other popular north-south roads throughout Flagler and Bunnell. They’re quite flat, save for the Granada Bridge, but run the gamut from heat-cracked old pavement to smooth, fresh asphalt. And the winds typically show up on at least one side of the river, often times on both and magically switching direction all too often. So, my test rides had headwinds, side winds and tail winds, some upwards of 15mph. Regardless of wind direction or speed, I felt fast on the Croz Blade and was able to hold higher-than-normal speeds for me, by what seemed to be 1-2 mph faster on average.Even with the stiff frame and seatpost, the bike did a decent job of mitigating road noise. Cracks and bumps transmitted fairly directly, but the constant buzz of old roads seemed damped a bit. Here’s what the rim brakes look like installed, and with Di2. The stem is simply massive, with a wide clamping area. It works great, but the hole on top and bottom between bolts and behind the handlebar creates a gap. While you’re set up may differ, this one created wind noise similar to blowing across the top of a Coke bottle. A piece of electrical tape over the bottom hole fixed the issue, but it took a while to figure out where the wind noise was coming from!The bottom bracket section and chainstays are stout, which translated into impressive stiffness. The bike is made for PFBB30, but the group we had was GXP, so we needed adapters.Aaaahhh, the cable routing. The drivetrain routing is fine, and installation is straightforward. No complaints there, though it’s worth mentioning that if you cross the housing in front of the headtube, the cables will cross each other inside the frame. But the brakes…Colp says this bike was absolutely designed with hydraulic disc brakes in mind. The mechanical brakes shown here stuck out a bit from the side, but something like the new SRAM Hydro disc calipers would streamline it quite a bit. Appearances and aerodynamics aside, the cable routing for the discs would absolutely benefit from being run with hydraulic hose rather than cable and housing:The front brake’s housing had to be fed up from the bottom and caught in a loop to pull it out of the hole just above the cantilever brake mount. This created a pretty tight radius curve, which seemed to add friction to the line. RIDE REVIEW The bike comes with both sets of brakes, and as the hydraulic models become available, those will be options. Note that these are TRP’s new Spyre mechs, which weren’t available at the time we received our test bike.Culprit is offering a promo through May 17, 2013, on both the Croz Blade and Arrow One. Hit the links for PDF special order forms. More info at CulpritBicycles.com.last_img read more

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first_imgDesert Cove (Photo courtesy of Marcus & Millichap)Marcus & Millichap (NYSE: MMI), a commercial real estate investment services firm with Phoenix offices, completed the sale of Tucson apartments, the Desert Cove, a 70-unit apartment property.Don Morrow, regional manager of the firm’s Phoenix office, said the asset sold for $3,120,000.Hamid Panahi, James Crawley, Cliff David and Steve Gebing, investment specialists in Marcus & Millichap’s Phoenix office, had the exclusive listing to market the property on behalf of the seller, a limited liability company.Desert Cove is located at 1201 N. Alvernon Way in Tucson.last_img read more

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first_imgShare on Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn “In this study, we found changes primarily in brain regions connected to sensation and sensory processing,”said co-principal investigator Kevin J. Black, MD, a professor of psychiatry.Differences in those brain regions make sense, Black said, because many people with Tourette’s explain that their tics occur mainly as a response to unusual sensations. The feeling that a part of the body doesn’t seem right, for example, prompts an involuntary sigh, vocalization, cough or twitch.“Just as you or I might cough or sneeze due to a cold, a person with Tourette’s frequently will have a feeling that something is wrong, and the tic makes it feel better,” Black said. “A young man who frequently clears his throat may report that doing so is a reaction to a tickle or some other unusual sensation in his throat. Or a young woman will move her shoulder when it feels strange, and the movement, which is a tic, will make the shoulder feel better.”In the largest study of its kind, the researchers conducted MRI scans at four U.S. sites to study the brains of 103 children with Tourette’s and compared them with scans of another 103 kids of the same age and sex but without the disorder. The scans of the children with Tourette’s revealed significantly more gray matter in the thalamus, the hypothalamus and the midbrain than in those without the disorder.The gray matter is where the brain processes information. It’s made up mainly of cells such as neurons, glial cells and dendrites, as well as axons that extend from neurons to carry signals.In kids with Tourette’s, the researchers also found less white matter around the orbital prefrontal cortex, just above the eyes, and in the medial prefrontal cortex, also near the front, than in kids without the condition.White matter acts like the brain’s wiring. It consists of axons that — unlike the axons in gray matter — are coated with myelin and transmit signals to the gray matter. Less white matter could mean less efficient transmission of sensations, whereas extra gray matter could mean nerve cells are sending extra signals.Black said it’s not possible to know yet whether the extra gray matter is transmitting information that somehow contributes to tics or whether reduced amounts of white matter elsewhere in the brains of kids with Tourette’s may somehow influence the movements and vocalizations that characterize the disorder. But he said that discovering these changes in the brain could give scientists new targets to better understand and treat Tourette’s.“This doesn’t tell us what happened to make the brain look this way,” Black explained. “Are there missing cells in certain places, or are the cells just smaller? And are these regions changing as the brain tries to resist tics? Or are the differences we observed contributing to problems with tics? We simply don’t know the answers yet.”Black said the researchers will aim to replicate these findings in additional patients and determine if and how the brain regions they identified may contribute to Tourette’s syndrome, with a goal of developing more effective therapies. Share on Facebookcenter_img Using MRIs, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified areas in the brains of children with Tourette’s syndrome that appear markedly different from the same areas in the brains of children who don’t have the neuropsychiatric disorder.The findings are available online Oct. 25 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.Tourette’s syndrome is defined by tics — involuntary, repetitive movements and vocalizations. Scientists estimate that the condition affects roughly one to 10 kids out of every 1,000 children. Email Sharelast_img read more

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first_imgEmily Smith Gilbert has been named the new editor-in-chief of The Southampton Review. Independent/Courtesy TSRStony Brook Southampton has marked two milestones this week for the Winter/Spring 2019 edition of TSR: The Southampton Review. The first is the publication of Vol. XIII, No. 1 of the literary and art journal. The second is the formal announcement of Emily Smith Gilbert as the new editor-in-chief.“Emily is wonderful, thoughtful, and an absolute delight to work with,” TSR founding Editor-in-Chief Lou Ann Walker said in a recent interview. “She is passionate about literature and the arts and making statements about what is important in the world.”Gilbert, who earned her MFA at Stony Brook Southampton in December 2015, worked on TSR as an editorial assistant while getting her degree, then as a contributing editor, and then managing editor last year.At Walker’s behest, in 2017 Gilbert wrote a grant to fund the redesign of TSR’s website. The grant from the Community of Literary Magazines and Presses enabled her to create TSR Online, which had long been a goal of the journal’s editors and publishers.“Moving forward with TSR, I plan to continue its mission to publish emerging authors alongside established names, as well as seeking out writing that engages with the political and cultural moment,” Gilbert told The Independent.The updated website, at www.thesouthamptonreview.com/tsronline/, showcases exclusive works that are generally shorter than those in the print journal, along with reprints of pieces from the print edition. The online journal also features original poetry and photography. Submissions are open essentially all year at thesouthamptonreview.com/submit, although editors have requested that people only submit once every six months so they can manage the flow.For the new print issue, Gilbert worked closely with Walker — now the Director of the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program — as the two have done for every edition over the past three years. The new editor-in-chief said that she is very grateful to have Walker as someone she can “always turn to and have that resource for a second opinion.”Going forward, Gilbert will be working with a team that includes Fiction Editor Amy Hempel, Poetry Editor Cornelius Eady, Associate Editor Vanessa Cuti, and Editorial Assistants Paige Chadwick and Jesi Halprin, who are both MFA students.In fiction, Gilbert singled out as one of the high points a short story, “For the Roses” by Cally Fiedorek, about a group of friends celebrating a 60th birthday at the Kentucky Derby. “This story has everything I look for in a short story,” Gilbert said. “World building, the creation of authentic characters, and taking you somewhere you have never been.”Other notable fiction pieces in this edition include Jake Lancaster’s first published story, “Holograms,” and “Shovelbums” by Amber Caron, which Gilbert called “a story for our times.”Memoir highlights in the new edition include “Hesitation,” a first memoir piece by Doug Neagoy, and “There Is Still Something To Be Done” by Esther Entin.“Hesitation” explores the experience of saving the life of a surfer, the hesitations that punctuate the process, and the internal conflicts that underlie those hesitations. “There Is Still Something To Be Done” deals with the author’s work as a resident in a pediatric ICU at a time when she was the only female resident on the unit. Despite her utter exhaustion while living almost completely encased in the medical world, there is always more to be done when working with children suffering from horrific health problems.Poetry selections in the new edition include “Lake” by Cornelia Channing, which came to TSR through the efforts of Poetry Editor Cornelius Eady. The issue has three poems by Billy Collins, and poems by Major Jackson and Michelle Whittaker, among others.The new edition of TSR features the winners of this year’s Short Short Fiction Prize; Tara Isabel Zambrano won first place for her story, “New Old.”Cartoons in the new issue include “Friendship” by Andrew Dicus, and works from previous contributors Matt Collins and Grant Snider.In addition to the front cover art, “Blue Cat,” and other works by Endre Penovác, other art in this issue was created by Pamela Singh, Star Black, Ilir Pojani, and Jamea Richmond-Edwards.Gilbert announced this week that the price of TSR has been reduced to $15 for an individual copy; $28 for a one-year subscription (two issues). The new issue of TSR will be available for reading at local libraries. Some pieces in the new issue will be posted on TSR Online. Copies may be purchased on the TSR website, with Gilbert noting that TSR “makes a great Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, birthday, or host or hostess gift.”Submissions for the Summer/Fall 2019 TSR print edition will be accepted from February 1 to April 1, 2019. Submissions for the Frank McCourt memoir prize, with the winner to be published in the Summer/Fall edition, will be accepted February 15 to March 15, 2019.For more information, visit the TSR website, www.thesouthamptonreview.com.bridget@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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first_imgThe European Commission (EC) will launch a Europe-wide consultation on collective actions next month, as it attempts once again to harmonise laws and improve access to compensation for individuals and small businesses. Announcing the forthcoming consultation in a speech at the University of Valladolid in Spain last week, competition policy commissioner Joaquín Almunia said that citizens and businesses need effective rights to obtain compensation, regardless of where they are in Europe. Almunia, alongside consumer policy commissioner John Dalli and justice commissioner Viviane Reding, signed a joint information note last week resolving to pursue the issue of collective actions. The EC failed to push through a directive on collective actions at the end of last year, following pressure from the European Parliament, which claimed that businesses would be exposed to abusive litigation under the proposed measures. ‘Every year, large numbers of small businesses and ordinary people in the EU are effectively deprived of their rights as economic actors and as citizens,’ said Almunia. He added: ‘We must identify safeguards that will prevent importing a US-style litigation culture. Collective action in Europe has not led to abuse – and this is something we should be proud of.’ Five ‘common principles’ will underpin the collective redress policy: effective compensation for those who have suffered damage; the need for measures to avoid abusive litigation; opportunities to resolve disputes through settlements or alternative means; the ability to enforce collective judgments throughout the EU; and the provision of adequate case financing for citizens and small businesses. Almunia said that only state bodies and certified non-profit organisations would be allowed to bring actions, and that any damages awarded would go entirely to victims and not to the representative entity. He said the commission’s work, although aimed at private enforcement of competition rules, would be applied to other areas such as environment and consumer protection. The public consultation will run until February 2011. In the second half of 2011 Almunia will present a ‘specific proposal on antitrust damages actions’ to the commission, which will ‘set common standards and minimum requi­re­ments for national systems of antitrust damages actions’.last_img read more

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first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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first_imgBNSF Logistics has expanded its fleet with a TEXX 900 wagon for transporting abnormal loads. The 20-axle shiftable well wagon has a capacity of more than 400 tonnes and can be moved 330 mm up, 280 mm down and 355 mm sideways. ‘The TEXX 900 is one of three similar cars in North America and the only of its kind available for booking outside a private fleet’, said BNSF Logistics President Dan Curtis. ‘We are so proud of our engineers for their relentless work to restore this car to be a lighter, stronger asset.’The Eurorail Logistics subsidiary of the Romanian Grampet Group recently has expanded its operations in Serbia to include the line from Subotica on the Hungarian border to Surčin near Beograd and from Surčin to Vršac on the Romanian border, using four electric and three diesel locomotives bought second hand. The company entered the Serbian market in May, operating from Jimbolia in Romania to Kikinda and on the Vršac – Pančevo route.ČD Cargo has become the sole owner of transport and forwarding company ČD Logistics, after purchasing the residual 28% stake from PKP Cargo-owned operator AWT for an undisclosed price. The company will be renamed to ČD Cargo Logistics. ČD Logistics recorded a profit of KC13m on a turnover of KC735m in 2017, with its activities including managing regular intermodal services between Yiwu in China and the ČD-DUSS terminal in Lovosice.On November 13 2018 first container train was dispatched from Zibo in China’s Shandong Province to Selyatino near Moscow, with an expected journey time of 14 days. RZD Logistics organised the ‘first mile’ road delivery of 36 40 ft containers with consumer goods, machinery and vehicles to Zibo. A regular service is planned.Work to expand railway facilities at Aqina on Afghanistan’s border with Turkmenistan was officially launched with a ceremony on November 21.New Zealand’s Provincial Growth Fund is to provide NZ$40m for KiwiRail to purchase land for an intermodal freight hub near Palmerston North, which would replace the existing Palmerston North Freight Yard which is now surrounded by urban development.UTLC ERA, Belintertrans-Germany, RZD’s Kaliningrad Railway and Kaliningrad Sea Trade Port co-operated to organise a two trial container services using shipping from Rotterdam to the Russian exclave then rail transport via Dostyk to Chengdu in China.On November 22 the UK’s Rail Freight Group published Rail Freight Outcomes in Rail Review, a position paper setting out what the freight sector would like to see in the comprehensive review of the rail sector which was announced by the government in September. RFG says any new structure must include an incentive framework which encourages and rewards freight growth; a strong central function with authority over timetabling and access; a national system of freight charges based on current principles; the right legal, commercial and regulatory levers to deliver freight needs; and the flexibility to meet the changing needs of freight customers.FERRMED’s second Eurasian Connectivity & Industrial Cooperation Forum was held in Brussels on November 21, to discuss enhancing of EU and trans–Eurasian freight corridors and the prioritisation of projects using business-oriented, socioeconomic criteria.last_img read more

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first_imgThe U.S. is confronting an outbreak of a novel coronavirus that causes serious respiratory disease and may be deadly for older people and those with weakened immune systems. The World Health Organization is now calling the outbreak a global pandemic because it is affecting countries all over the world. People and organizations can still fight coronavirus by taking steps to prevent transmission of the disease. The whole point of widespread cancellation of events is to create “social distancing” to lower the infection rate and prevent health care systems from being overwhelmed. The New York State Department of Health also has a coronavirus website with English and Spanish posters for preventing coronavirus infection.advertisementadvertisementThe U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides clear guidance about preventing infection in both English and Spanish. They also provide a number of printable factsheets and posters in English and Spanish suitable for use in the workplace.Employer actions stepsYour farm workforce is not immune to coronavirus; please begin taking steps to protect yourself and your employees.1. Talk with your employees about coronavirus, how it spreads and how to prevent getting infected.2. Print the CDC factsheets and posters, post in your workplace and employee housing facilities.3. Provide guidance to help employees clean and disinfect employer-provided housing. Follow up with employees and manage the process to be sure this happens. Set up a regular weekly and daily schedule for cleaning.advertisement4. Clean and disinfect your workplace. The employee breakroom and bathroom are great places for a virus to be transmitted. Clean and disinfect any areas where employees congregate or routinely touch items such as doorknobs and computer keyboards. Set up daily and weekly cleaning schedules.5. Provide cleaning supplies such as cleaning solutions, buckets, mops, brushes, etc. for cleaning at work and for those living in employer-provided housing.6. Review your sick leave policy. The first advice for people who are sick is to stay home except to get medical care. Do you provide paid sick leave for your employees? If you do not, will employees feel financially obligated to come to work even if they are sick?7. Communicate with employees that they should stay home if they are sick. Employees sometimes come to work believing they will face punishment or firing if they miss work. Be sure your employees understand that their health and that of their co-workers’ comes first. Communicate and make a plan to cover for sick employees. CDC provides posters in English and Spanish covering symptoms of novel coronavirus.8. Prepare your disaster contingency plan. What will you do if 50% of your employees become sick and are unable to work? Are there neighboring farms who might be able to share resources in an emergency? Who will manage for a few weeks if you or another key manager are unable to leave your house or are hospitalized?Cornell provides the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN) to provide community education resources across the entire disaster cycle of preparedness, response and recovery.advertisementPenn State also provides farm disaster preparedness resources.At a minimum, share the guidelines below from New York state with your employees and family.New York State Department of Health prevention tipsWhile there is currently no vaccine to prevent this virus, these simple steps can help stop the spread of this and other respiratory viruses:Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. Avoid close contact with people who are sick.Stay home when you are sick.Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.  This originally appeared in the Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development Ag Workforce Journal. ILLUSTRATION: Illustration by Kristen Phillips. Richard StupAgricultural Workforce SpecialistCornell UniversityEmail Richard Stuprstup@cornell.edulast_img read more

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