first_imgThe brain is a highly organized and complex organ that functions as the coordinating center of sensation and intellectual and nervous activity. Each area of the brain directly corresponds to a very specific function (emotions, movement, visual processing, memory, etc.), but, up until two days ago, scientists were unable to decipher exactly which area of the brain corresponded to music perception. On December 16th, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) announced that neuroscientists at the university were able to identify a neural population highly selective for music … for the first time ever!In analyzing the human auditory cortex, researchers identified six respective neural populations that process and separate noise stimulus (or sounds) into categories: music, speech, and then functional categories like frequency and pitch. According to one of the scientists working on this case, Josh McDermott, “One of the core debates surrounding music is to what extent it has dedicated mechanisms in the brain and to what extent it piggybacks off of mechanisms that primarily serve other functions.”Science Confirms That People Who Play Music Are Smarter Than Others [Watch]This was the area in question that had researchers most curious. So they decided to map the entire brain’s auditory system using an fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging used to catalogue neural activity by charting blood flow; an incredibly difficult task to conquer with such minute spatial resolution).The scientists observed ten people by sampling their neural responses to 165 samples of recorded sound (the closing of a door, the flush of a toilet, the beat of a drum, etc.) They measured the activity in voxels, the smallest unit of measurement to reflect the response of hundreds of thousands or millions of neurons. Using this system, the team was able to observe and draw up a visual map of exactly where the brain activity took place.Contrary to normal everyday sounds, “the music result is notable because people had not been able to clearly see highly selective responses to music before,” says Sam Norman-Haignere, a postdoc at MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research. He continues, “We think this provides evidence that there’s a hierarchy of processing where there are responses to relatively simple acoustic dimensions in this primary auditory area. That’s followed by a second stage of processing that represents more abstract properties of sound related to speech and music.” So this means that we are able to register, process, and encode music differently than the way we respond to other noise stimuli.With said neural populations responding specifically to music, their findings provide evidence that music corresponds to its own music-selective neural environment —a discovery not yet proven by any research to date. The researchers are now investigating whether there are sub-populations of neurons that respond directly to specific aspects of music (rhythm, melody, beat, etc.), and also hope to find how musical training might affect this newly discovered neural population. Watch more about how researchers identified a neural population in the human auditory cortex that responds specifically to music:[Via MIT News]last_img read more

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first_imgEditor’s note: This is Part V of a five-part series detailing how NASCAR successfully ran its 2020 season amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.  Part I: Overview | Part II: Schedule | Part III: Broadcast | Part IV: TeamsAs masked fans filtered into Talladega Superspeedway in orderly fashion, NASCAR field and office workers wandered about the sparse crowd, assisting where and when needed. They handed out two-ounce containers of hand sanitizer and clear bags for those who forgot about the no-coolers rule. Some walked with signs that read “please wear your mask” and “please observe six-feet social distancing,” as they respected the requests themselves.This didn’t fit in most of the employees’ job descriptions. Many who volunteered to help actually drove to Talladega, Alabama, from the NASCAR headquarters in Charlotte, North Carolina, and Daytona Beach, Florida, specifically for this race weekend.Even Talladega track president Brian Crichton left the infield to lend a hand.“The people we encountered and we talked to, they were thanking us,” Crichton said. “They were thanking us for making it possible for them to come back to races. I got a little bit of goosebumps when they said that. I got a little emotional. But it meant so much for the fans to be able to come back as well.”After a Sunday rainout, June 22 marked the first NASCAR race with paying customers since the two-month COVID-19 shutdown. Homestead-Miami Speedway invited up to 1,000 South Florida service members as honorary guests the previous weekend. Talladega, though, sold up to 5,000 tickets, along with limited motor-home/fifth-wheel camping spots outside the track, on a first-come, first-served basis — prioritizing those in-state and within a 150-mile radius.INFORMATION: Centers for Disease Control | World Health OrganizationTalladega had to get approval to host fans from Alabama governor Kay Ivey, the Alabama Health Department and Talladega County officials. The race was scheduled regardless, making up for the original April 26 postponement. Crichton found it in the track’s favor that NASCAR had already completed eight races since its May return, proving the sport’s protocols and procedures were thorough enough to be reliably safe.NASCAR announced fans would be allowed on June 9 — less than two weeks before the GEICO 500.“It was stressful because we knew as a southeast region, as a NASCAR team, we all had to come together and make it successful,” Crichton said. “It had to be a success so we could continue to build off of it and continue to go racing.”Talladega built off of NASCAR’s procedures and protocols for essential personnel.Upon entering the premises, fans went through drive-in stations where they answered COVID-19 symptom and exposure questions and had their temperature checked by a handheld thermometer. If everyone in the car passed, they moved on to park. Those who didn’t went to a secondary screening with Emergency Medical Services (EMS) officials. Same thing: Pass, move on. Crichton said there were no instances where someone had to be turned away, which would have been the case if medical professionals thought there was reason to worry.Tips for inside the venue came from an unexpected source. Select NASCAR employees, including Managing Director of Racing Operations Tom Bryant, toured Universal Orlando about 10 days before the theme park reopened June 5.“We spent an entire day with their team going through everything from how they parked their guests to how they entered the facility to how they screened them,” Bryant said. “How they had concessions set up, how they had restrooms set up, how they had to adapt movement in and around the attractions to keep people socially distanced. Everything you can think of.”And everything that relates to a NASCAR event.Masks were required at all times. Social-distancing pucks — basically stickers on the ground — detailed common areas and where lines formed. Concessions solely offered pre-packaged foods and sealed drinks. Cashless payment was used to limit touch exposure. Bathrooms had every other stall or urinal blocked off.Talladega also hired a cleaning team through its environmental-services partner, Clean Harbors. It sanitized the entire venue before and after the event. During the race, its cleaners constantly were on the move, wiping down all high-touch surfaces.The infield was completely off limits to fans.As for the grandstands, Talladega grouped seats in pods of four, starting two or three chairs in from the aisle to keep a safe social distance between those sitting and those walking up and down the stairs. Only one or two pods were ticketed per row.“Even if we had space between those two groups of four – say the row was 30 seats long – well, we wouldn’t put a group in the middle, not even a group of four in the middle, because that group would have to walk in front of one of these other groups,” Crichton said. “But what we could do is we could put a group of four in the row behind those two groups, but they were in the middle of the row, so it was staggered.”Fans witnessed the drama of seeing two wrecks on the final lap, Ryan Blaney beating Ricky Stenhouse Jr. to the checkered flag by .007 seconds, which tied for the sixth-closest finish in Cup Series history, and Aric Almirola crossing the finish line backward in third.WATCH: Talladega Superspeedway’s 2020 photo finish“Man, it was so great just to have fans back,” Blaney said post-race. “The atmosphere of them cheering was back. Before and after the race, we love that stuff. Drivers, we love support.”Attendance wasn’t guaranteed after that event, though. It still depends on local and state COVID-19 restrictions.The NASCAR Playoffs is currently in its Round of 12. The opening race last weekend at Las Vegas Motor Speedway did not have fans. This Sunday’s event at Talladega will still be far from full capacity, but a track representative indicated the number of spectators welcomed will be up from the June count. Charlotte Motor Speedway will permit a limited number of fans for the elimination race scheduled Oct. 11 on its Roval layout, in accordance to North Carolina’s recently updated rules.As of right now, Phoenix Raceway plans to host fans for the Nov. 8, 2020 championship.“Having our fans back is awesome and we look forward to the day we can have all of them back in full capacity, but that’s not yet,” Bryant said. “Our priority and the marching orders we’ve received are to ensure our ability to crown champions in Phoenix. We are laser-focused on that. We’re not going to do anything on the fan side that would endanger our ability to conduct races. It’s a balance.”last_img read more

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first_imgLoad remaining images St. Paul and The Broken Bones were the headlining act at The Stone Pony in Asbury Park, NJ on Saturday night where the band played one of the afterparties for the nearby Sea.Hear.Now Festival.Related: Lettuce Rocks Sea.Hear.Now Pre-Party At Asbury Park’s The Stone PonyTangier’s Blues Band with special guest Mike McCready (Pearl Jam) got the night going with an opening set prior to St. Paul and The Broken Bones taking the stage.St. Paul and The Broken Bones had no trouble keeping fans dancing into the night by the time they went on following a sunny day at the beach for the festival. The band also added to the night’s celebration by welcoming special guests including Wesley Schultz of The Lumineers, Jake Clemons of The E Street Band, and Luke Spiller of The Struts.Watch St. Paul and The Broken Bones cover The Band‘s’ “Ophelia” with Wesley Schultz on vocals during Saturday’s performance below.St. Paul and The Broken Bones with Wesley Schultz – “Ophelia” – 9/21/2019[Video: Michael Brazinski]Scroll down for a full gallery of photos from Saturday’s Sea.Hear.Now afterparty, courtesy of photographer Ron Valle.St. Paul and The Broken Bones | The Stone Pony | Asbury Park, NJ | 9/21/2019 | Photos: Ron Vallelast_img read more

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first_imgWith the presidential election swiftly approaching, the Saint Mary’s Young Democrats Club is gearing up for the final preparations President Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney make as the country heads into November. Senior London Lamar, president of Young Democrats at the College, said she realizes that a great aspect of this election has been social media and how it has taken the election process to another level. “I did my senior comprehensive on how President Obama won the 2008 election with social media. You have to look at how, generally, Republican supporters are older, middle-aged to older white Americans,” Lamar said. “Those who support Obama tend to be more diverse, young Americans. You have to realize that when it comes to social media and technology, the younger generation is adapting more than the older generation.” By looking at social media as a way of determining who will win the election, Lamar believes that most voters will see that Obama leads the race on Twitter and Facebook. “His supporters use technology more because they tend to be younger,” she said. “We are a generation that uses technology in our everyday lives, especially Twitter and Facebook. Those were definitely pieces of technology that helped Obama win because that is how young people are communicating.” Lamar noted that Romney supporters tend to continue to read the newspapers and read magazine. For them, she said, their generation is not adapting to social media because they do not use it as much. “For Romney, he’s trying to get the younger electorate with the social media; however, fewer supporters of his are actually using social media,” Lamar said. “He is definitely adapting to social media more though. For example, I was on Twitter Monday and I noticed that the Romney campaign had bought a Twitter topic as a way to get Romney to trend on the social media site. “With Obama, it takes one tweet with a hashtag to get a topic trending on Twitter. His supporters are more Twitter-savvy than Romney’s at this point.” While Lamar believes social media does have a huge impact on the voting process, she does not think it will necessarily determine the final outcome. “It definitely does help to determine how a candidate will reach out to the younger generation though. Our generation is moving to use more social media now and more newspapers and magazines are becoming heavily web-based,” she said. “As our technology is getting older and we are becoming of voting age, we have to adapt to what we like and what we use the most. The Young Democrats will also be holding some upcoming events for students before the election is underway. The club will be hosting another phone bank Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. in Regina Hall. “At the phone bank we call Ohio voters to encourage them to make sure they get out an early vote and to encourage them to vote on Nov. 6,” Lamar said. “Ohio is a big crucial swing state, so we want to make sure that we are helping the Obama campaign in South Bend contribute to calling Ohio voters.” A representative from the Obama campaign of South Bend brings the club members call logs and scripts for the phone bank. The participants then call the numbers and ask voters questions to help the campaign narrow down and see where Obama stands, Lamar said. “We are also partnering with Feminists United for an election panel we will be holding next Monday from 6 to 7 p.m. located in Conference Room A of the Student Center,” Lamar said. “We have professor Patrick Pierce coming to talk about the election. Students can come and ask the him questions about what he thinks about the election.” Students can also ask Pierce to help clarify items on the election that they are unsure of still. Pierce is the advisor for Young Democrats at the College. “It is a bipartisan event, so anyone can come and ask questions; kind of get a deeper perspective of what the election is about and what the stances are of the two candidates,” Lamar said. “This is a great event especially for those who are still undecided because the election is only two weeks away.”last_img read more

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first_img Related The IRONMAN Foundation will distribute US$60,000 in charitable giveback to non-profit initiatives and groups in the greater Coeur d’Alene region, in Idaho, in conjunction with the 2016 IRONMAN Coeur d’Alene triathlon taking place on Sunday 21 August.With this most recent donation from The IRONMAN Foundation, a total of US$80,000 has been given back to the Coeur d’Alene community this year. The IRONMAN Foundation Community Fund provides community and volunteerism grant opportunities to non-profit organizations where IRONMAN events are held.The IRONMAN Foundation’s contribution will provide support to non-profit needs and initiatives within the local community, and brings the total giveback to more than US$715,000 in the region.In 2016, The IRONMAN Foundation will distribute more than US$1.6 million in grant funding to support the needs of IRONMAN race communities across North America.Community grantsThe IRONMAN Foundation provides charitable support to a variety of local non-profit organizations that recognize citizens in need and support The Foundation’s mission. The Foundation works with community leaders to identify projects and initiatives and to provide funding in order to support worthwhile causes.This year, The IRONMAN Foundation Community Fund will distribute US$25,000 in grants to organizations making a positive impact within Kootenai County. One featured grant recipient, the Coeur d’Alene Parks & Recreation Department, will receive a US$10,000 grant to provide low-cost programs with available scholarships for all those who wish to participate in their recreational opportunities.“We as a community are happy to have this partnership with IRONMAN and believe that Coeur d’Alene is the perfect venue for both the IRONMAN 70.3 Coeur d’Alene triathlon and the IRONMAN Coeur d’Alene triathlon,” said Bill Greenwood, Coeur d’Alene Parks & Recreation Director.“Our ongoing relationship over the years with The IRONMAN Foundation has allowed us to provide recreational scholarships to the youth of the area an opportunity that otherwise may have been missed for these children to participate in our activities and for those who could become the next great athlete to be discovered.”Another featured grant recipient, the Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center, will be receiving a US$10,000 grant to support its third-grade learn-to-swim program, which teaches children critical water safety skills and swim basics. This will be the eighth year The IRONMAN Foundation has supported this important initiative. To date, 5,767 children from 16 North Idaho Schools have participated in the program.“Our goal is to save lives,” said Cynthia Rozyla, Salvation Army Kroc Center Development Coordinator. “The third-grade swim is making that possible and The IRONMAN Foundation has been the key to that success.”“Grant funding is one way that The IRONMAN Foundation leaves a lasting legacy in the communities where IRONMAN races take place,” said Dave Deschenes, Executive Director of The IRONMAN Foundation. “We are pleased to be able to support the Coeur d’Alene region with these community grants.”The IRONMAN Foundation will recognize this year’s community grant recipients at the athlete welcome ceremony taking place at 18:00 on Friday 19 August 2016 at Bandshell City Park.Volunteerism grantsWithin IRONMAN’s race communities, The IRONMAN Foundation provides a grant program to support organizations that have a volunteerism component. This year, The IRONMAN Foundation’s Community Fund will provide US$35,000 in volunteer grant donations for the IRONMAN Coeur d’Alene triathlon.“We are thrilled to continue our support of so many tremendous organizations that selflessly serve others within Kootenai County,” said Christine Perkins, Community Relations Manager for The IRONMAN Foundation. Last year, volunteer grant funding was distributed among 40 community groups in the region.Team IMFTEAM IMF is The IRONMAN Foundation’s fundraising triathlon team. Team members have the opportunity to race in the IRONMAN event of their choice when they commit to raise US$3,500 for The IRONMAN Foundation’s Community Fund.Three athletes participating in this program through the 2016 IRONMAN Coeur d’Alene triathlon have raised over US$10,000, while collectively all of The Foundation’s TEAM IMF athletes have raised over US$412,000 for The IRONMAN Foundation’s Community Fund in 2016.www.ironman.com/coeurdalenewww.ironmanfoundation.orglast_img read more

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first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Anthony DemangoneHow do you spend the first 10 minutes of your day?A recent article I read says it is a very important decision. Both for chefs, and for you. Yep, I said chefs. Here’s a snippet.If you’re working in the kitchen of Anthony Bourdain, legendary chef of Brasserie Les Halles, best-selling author, and famed television personality, you don’t dare so much as boil hot water without attending to a ritual that’s essential for any self-respecting chef: mise-en-place.The “Meez,” as professionals call it, translates into “everything in its place.” In practice, it involves studying a recipe, thinking through the tools and equipment you will need, and assembling the ingredients in the right proportion before you begin. It is the planning phase of every meal—the moment when chefs evaluate the totality of what they are trying to achieve and create an action plan for the meal ahead.For the experienced chef, mise-en-place represents more than a quaint practice or a time-saving technique. It’s a state of mind.I like Bourdain, and I get a kick out of the quote. Because as much as his personality comes across as free and unpredictable, much of his success has come from planning. From the mise-en-place. Do most of us follow suit? The article argues that we do not.Most of us do not work in kitchens. We do not interact with ingredients that need to be collected, prepped, or measured. And yet the value of applying a similar approach and deliberately taking time out to plan before we begin is arguably greater. continue reading »last_img read more

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first_imgCassidy Turley announced that Inland Kenworth has purchased 17 acres at the southwest corner of 83rd Avenue and Interstate 10 for nearly $5M. The seller was Rados Properties—Arizona Land, LLC.Cassidy Turley Senior Vice President Steve Mardian represented Inland Kenworth in the sale transaction. Allen Lowe, Principal with Lee & Associates, represented Rados Properties.According to Greg Sternberg, Vice President, Inland Kenworth (US) Inc., “Inland will provide new and used truck sales, parts sales, service sales, body shop repair and PacLease truck leasing and rental in our new location, and will employ between 110-150 employees with sales between $150M and $200M.”Inland plans to build an 85,000 to 100,000-square-foot facility at the 83rd Avenue location with a target completion of late fall 2014. Nineteen years ago, Inland built its current Phoenix location on 59th Avenue just south of I-10 and in late 2012, sold it to the Arizona Department of Transportation to accommodate the upcoming South Mountain Bypass project. Mardian explained, “Inland Kenworth was looking for a location that provided them with good visibility and great ingress and egress to the site for their customers. Finding 17 acres in Tolleson that was part of the undeveloped business park was a bonus, as that became the catalyst for developing the entire park to support other commercial transportation businesses.”“The addition of Inland Kenworth to our community affirms the city of Tolleson’s firm grasp on trucking commerce in the southwest region,” said Tolleson’s Mayor Adolfo F. Gámes. “This is the third truck sales, parts and service provider to locate in our city. We are pleased that our years of investment in industrial development are now paying off for our community in the form of retail development.”.Inland will be the first occupant of a new 85-acre business park in Tolleson. Rados Properties is developing the park with improved lots starting at approximately four acres available for sale. Les Brown, Operations Executive for Rados Properties, explained, “We are delighted to have concluded this sale to Inland Kenworth, especially since they have previously purchased land from us in Tucson for their facility there. We expect Rados Tolleson Center to be a very successful project because we have a great anchor tenant; the City is business friendly; the site has great freeway exposure; and it is ideally located for the sale and distribution of goods and products to the southwestern United States.”  Lee & Associates has the marketing assignment for the business park.last_img read more

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first_imgScientific American: I have always assumed that having a strong sense of self-worth was important. I figured it made a person happier, healthier, more successful, and easier to be around. Turns out that these benefits of self-esteem are rather hard to prove. Having high self-esteem has some modest pluses, studies suggest.…Speaking of learning, this issue of Mind includes a Special Report that highlights learning techniques. In the lead article of this section, John Dunlosky, a psychologist at Kent State and his colleagues explain how they sifted through hundreds of scientific papers to determine what study methods work best (see “Identify the Best Ways to Study”). These techniques cement knowledge in the long run, no matter what the material to be learned or the test used to measure comprehension. Here’s the lowdown.Read the whole story: Scientific American More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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first_imgAmong all the impacts of climate change, from rising sea levels to landslides and flooding, there is one that does not get the attention it deserves: an exacerbation of inequalities, particularly for women. Sep 3, 2020 You may be interested in… UNGA – Statement by Dominica’s Foreign Minister Francine BaronSecretary General of the United Nations, President of the General Assembly Distinguished Heads of Delegations, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen: Madam President, I congratulate you on your appointment and my delegation extends best wishes to you for a productive tenure, as you seek to direct the affairs of this important institution,…September 30, 2018In “Dominica”OP-ED | Gender equality has never been so close but still far from being a realityBy Patricia Scotland Commonwealth Secretary-General (Guyana Chronicle) This month the Commonwealth Women’s Affairs Ministers Meeting will assemble in Nairobi, Kenya. It has taken place regularly since 1985, to take stock of the current status of gender equality in our member countries, and to share perspectives and experience of how progress…September 18, 2019In “Indepth”Gender Gap Made Worse by Land DegradationBy Desmond Brown (IPS) In parts of the world where the gender gap is already wide, land degradation places women and girls at even greater risk. The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) framework for Land Degradation Neutrality (LDN), highlights that land degradation in developing countries impacts men and women differently, mainly due…January 31, 2019In “CARICOM Secretariat”Share this on WhatsApp NASA Features Belizean Scientist, Emil Cherrington and… Sep 4, 2020 Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Oct 7, 2020 ‘Step In our Shoes’ – Dr. Carla Barnett Sep 10, 2020 Especially in poor countries, women’s lives are often directly dependent on the natural environment.Women bear the main responsibility for supplying water and firewood for cooking and heating, as well as growing food. Drought, uncertain rainfall and deforestation make these tasks more time-consuming and arduous, threaten women’s livelihoods and deprive them of time to learn skills, earn money and participate in community life.Read more at Inter Press Service Make COVID Recovery ‘a true turning point’ for people and… Greater Focus on Regional Agriculture last_img read more

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