first_img She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, Leroy Savoie Sr., one sister, Shirley Simonette, two brothers, Willis Simonette Sr., Wilmer Simonette Sr., and one nephew, Wilmer Simonette Jr.She leaves to cherish her memories one son Lee Roy Savoie Jr. (Paula) of Beaumont, Texas, one daughter, Janice Milo (Kenneth) of Port Arthur, Texas. Five grandchildren, Reginald Savoie (Dawn Sherese) of Port Arthur, Texas, Tiffany Underwood (Bryan) of Beaumont, Texas, Michael Savoie (Dawn Sherrell) of Dallas, Texas, Alena Savoie of Beaumont, Texas, and Carina Savoie of Houston, Texas. One sister, Virginia Chavis, one brother, Paul Simonette, one special Sister-in-law, Catherine Simonette, and one special nephew, James Simonette, all of Port Arthur, Texas. Eleven great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.Visitation will be from 12:00 p.m. until 2:00 p.m., Friday, March 31, 2017 at Kingdom Dominion Church, 3600 Memorial Blvd., Port Arthur, TX.  Homegoing service will be at 2:00 p.m. Entombment will follow at Greenlawn Memorial Park, under the direction of Hannah Funeral Home Inc. Jeanette Savoie, 82, of Port Arthur, Texas, transitioned from this life on Sunday, March 26, 2017, at the Medical Center of Southeast Texas.  She was born June 3, 1934, in Opelousas Lousiana, to the late Alexander and Mary (Batiste) Simonette.  She was a resident of Port Arthur for sixty four years.last_img read more

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first_img His surviving sister is Mary Helen Hardy.Darnell went to grade school at St. Mary’s and Bishop Byrne High School Section 1 in Port Arthur, TX; joined the Navy from 1954 through 1955 as a Seaman.He worked at Texaco Case and Packaging Division in Port Arthur for 26 years then at C.O. Wilson Junior High School in Nederland for 11 years. For many years he ministered in the library at the Stiles Unit, a prison for men in Beaumont where he taught Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) classes; volunteered with Homebound Ministries and Prison Ministries at the Jefferson County jail.His love sign was popping, “The Rod.”A Christian Vigil will be held Saturday, May 16, 2020, from 10:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m., with a rosary to be recited at 11:00 a.m. at Melancon’s Funeral Home. Interment will follow at 2:00 p.m., Saturday, May 16, 2020, at Memory Garden’s Cemetery in Nederland.In lieu of flowers, a memorial contribution can be made to the Wounded Warriors Project. Darnell Joseph Pinell Sr., 85, of Nederland, TX passed away Saturday, May 2, 2020.He was born in Port Arthur, Texas on December 17, 1934, at home to his parents, Eugene Earnest Pinell Sr., and Annie Bergeron Pinell.Darnell was preceded in death by his parents; brother, Eugene Earnest Pinell Jr., sister, Gloria Smith and brother, Dixie Pinell.center_img He married Susan Berzas of Ville Platte, LA, on July 4, 1958, and was married for 62 years.He is survived by their three children, Darnell Joseph Pinell Jr. and his wife Wanda; Jeannie Ann Fancher; and Adam Eugene Pinell and his wife, Cindy. Darnell and Susan have four grandchildren, Bryan and Jeremy Fancher, and Christine and Alex Pinell.Both Darnell and Susan have been members of St. Charles Catholic Church for 60 years.Darnell’s hobby was woodworking and helping to raise their children.last_img read more

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first_imgThis group boasts the motto, “The World is our Classroom.” Its mission is to provide quality, hands-on aircraft, munitions and communications-electronics maintenance training to meet the evolving needs of its primary cus- tomer, the first-line supervisor. The group takes the classroom to the maintenance specialists at 46 worldwide locations, including Alaska, Europe and the Pacific Theater. More than 1,200 people are assigned to the group, its two training squadrons and one maintenance squadron. The group’s annual student production exceeds 30,000.982ND MAINTENANCE SQUADRONProvides top-quality trainer maintenance for the Air Force’s largest training wing and two satellite locations.Trainers maintained by civilians, military and contractors.Sixty-eight ground instructional training aircraft.More than 14,500 equipment items.Aircraft trainers: 1,100.Total value in excess of $1.9 billion.Annual budget of approximately $14 million.367TH TRAINING SUPPORT SQUADRONSupports Air Combat Command and Combat Air Force as well as Air Mobility Command and Mobility Air Force aircraft and munitions maintenance by:Creating world-class, interactive, multimedia instruction to improve aircraft and munitions maintenance training effectiveness.Providing reliable, unbiased fact-based performance analysis, identifying root causes of performance deficiencies and recommending possible solutions.Applying Instructional Systems Design with the latest e-learning technologies to alleviate specifically identified knowledge and skill gaps.Evaluating effectiveness, instructional integrity and sustaining technical accuracy of our training products.372ND TRAINING SQUADRONProvides formal advanced aircraft maintenance training for bomber, fighter, unmanned aircraft systems, jet engine and support equipment to eight MAJCOMs, ANG, sister services and allied forces.Awards aircraft maintenance skill levels.Trains more than 20,000 students annually in 311 courses at 27 detachments worldwide.373RD TRAINING SQUADRONProvides formal advanced aircraft maintenance training on airlift, tanker, special operations and special mission widebodied aircraft to eight MAJCOMs, ANG, sister services and allied forces.Awards aircraft maintenance skill levels.Trains more than 15,000 students annually in 320 courses at 19 detachments worldwide.last_img read more

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first_imgDavid Robinson, Acting State Director for USDA Rural Development announces that three non-profits in the Northeast Kingdom each received $100,000 in grant funds. They are Gilman Housing Trust, Inc, d/b/a Rural Edge, Northeast Employment and Training Organization and Vermont Center for Independent Living. The Northeast Kingdom (Essex, Orleans and Caledonia Counties) region is a USDA designated Rural Economic Area Partnership (REAP) Zone and this project has been approved by the Northeast Kingdom Collaborative ‘ the governing body which provides oversight to the Rural Economic Action Plan. ‘This is very exciting for our REAP Zone and our Housing Preservation Grant program.  These funds help to assists existing programs to take care of the serious issues in these homes in this area.  This is one of many great partnering accomplishments for USDA and all of the other funders in Vermont.’ said David Robinson.The Housing Preservation Grant is structured to help assist households with repair/rehab, weatherization, health & safety issues, accessibility, and more to single family dwellings.  Vermont Center for Independent Living has received funds twice for this area.  This year they plan on assisting 17 very low households.Northeast Employment and Training, Inc. has been with this program since 2006.  They have had a very strong weatherization program that this grant has helped keep going strong.  They are assisting 30 very low households.Gilman Housing Trust, Inc. d/b/a Rural Edge has been USDA’s longest partner in this program and the grant money has worked very well with their revolving loan fund program as well as the success they have receiving funds from other funders.  They will be assisting 15 very low income households in this area.   Joe Allard, Rehab Specialist, RuralEdge, stated, ‘One recipient, Julie Perry of Newport contacted us and asked for assistance in getting a new water heater and an accessible ramp.  Once the Initial Site Visit was completed, we found that the bathroom was not accessible and that changes needed to be made here for the owner to safely use the bathroom. The fuel oil tank was also badly rusted and appeared to seep out some oil around the fittings.  We have pooled together funding from our HPG program, Vermont Center for Independent Living’s HAP program, and two small grants from NEKCA and the State of Vermont ANR’s fuel tank replacement program.  She now has a new fuel tank, a new water heater, and a completely modified bathroom.  There are other items that are being addressed on this home today.’ “The population Gilman Housing Trust, Inc., d/b/a RuralEdge serves is extremely stressed.  Cultural resistance to accepting assistance often leads to clients approaching us only when conditions become unlivable.  Additionally, as the poorest region in a rural state, our clients are often at 30% median income or well below. Without the program’s ability to grant HPG funds, most of these applicants would either have to leave their home – with few or no options – or attempt to persist in very difficult circumstances.  It is no overstatement to say that HPG funds are saving lives in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont.” George Mathias, Chief Operating Officer, RuralEdge.President Obama’s plan for rural America has brought about historic investment and resulted in stronger rural communities. Under the President’s leadership, these investments in housing, community facilities, businesses and infrastructure have empowered rural America to continue leading the way ‘ strengthening America’s economy, small towns and rural communities.USDA’s investments in rural communities support the rural way of life that stands as the backbone of our American values. President Obama and Agriculture Secretary Vilsack are committed to a smarter use of Federal resources to foster sustainable economic prosperity and ensure the government is a strong partner for businesses, entrepreneurs and working families in rural communities. USDA, through its Rural Development mission area, has a portfolio of programs designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life in rural America. USDA has made a concerted effort to deliver results for the American people, even as the Department implements sequestration ‘ the across-the-board budget reductions mandated under terms of the Budget Control Act. USDA has already undertaken historic efforts since 2009 to save more than $828 million in taxpayer funds through targeted, common-sense budget reductions. These reductions have put USDA in a better position to carry out its mission, while implementing sequester budget reductions in a fair manner that causes as little disruption as possible.USDA Rural Development 8.15.2013last_img read more

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first_imgVermont Business Magazine Lisa Ventriss, President of Vermont Business Roundtable (VBR) and Jeffrey Carr, President, Economic & Policy Resources (EPR), have announced the Q2 2016 results of their joint initiative, the VBR-EPR Business Conditions Survey. For this reporting period, the diffusion index shows a decline in optimism from Q1 2016 to Q2 2016, indicating that Vermont CEOs continue to feel neutral to mildly pessimistic about the business climate for the coming three months. The survey, which is conducted quarterly, provides both a look back at the previous quarter and a predictive index going forward. The data for both the backward and forward-looking questions are weighted to the Vermont economy by sector employment and turned into “diffusion indices.” These diffusion indices provide a tool for analyzing and presenting insight into the Vermont economy over time through the sentiments of the Roundtable members.The raw survey data can be easily compared to the national Business Roundtable CEO Survey, a quarterly survey of national and multi-national companies, which contains similar questions to the VBR/EPR Survey in terms of employment and capital spending. Comparing these two surveys revealed that Vermont companies are more positive-to-neutral about employment stability than national companies, while capital spending outlooks were slightly less optimistic than in the past for VBR respondents and more closely align with BRT results.Each question on the survey is weighted by sector employment and the diffusion number is formulated by giving each “strong positive” answer a numerical value of 1.0, “mild positive” answers a numerical value of 0.5, neutral answers a value of 0, “mild negative” answers a value of -0.5, and strong negative values of -1.0. The diffusion index numbers are then formulated based on these numerical values. A value of 100 would mean that every respondent answered “strong positive”, a value of 0 would mean that every respondent answered neutrally, and a value of -100 would mean that every respondent answered “strong negatively.”Overall FindingsThe latest survey, which was conducted during the first two weeks of April 2016, achieved a response rate of 74 percent overall and included a 50 percent or greater response rate from all but three sectors within the membership. The survey asked eight retrospective and prospective questions about the CEOs’ economic outlook, demand, capital spending, and employment. Survey results show that:Most responses to the question about the state’s overall business climate outlook were neutral (51%). The remaining responses were split between optimistic (28%) and pessimistic (20%).More than 60 percent of respondents (62%) shared negative outlooks specifically with ease of hiring for available positions; and,The education sector had the most optimistic outlook on the general business climate, while the health care sector had the least optimistic outlook.Graph #1 below shows the diffusion index of overall economic outlook, which measures the level of confidence (optimism or pessimism) respondents have about different aspects of the economy based on the first question on the survey, and can range from 100 (where 100% of respondents answered “strong positive”) to -100 (where 100% of respondents answered “strong negative”).Graph #2 above shows the composite index of the diffusion index points for the questions relating to demand, capital spending, and employment in the next three months. The majority of responses were neutral and the index point slid from a mildly optimistic index point of 19 last survey to an index point of 9 this survey, indicating a shift toward true neutral. The outlook remains in the neutral range.Also included in the survey was the opportunity for Roundtable members to express their opinions on other topics adversely affecting their businesses. The greatest frequency of responses from members concerned high taxes and tax policies, health care costs, economic growth/development in Vermont, and the difficulty of finding workers.The next survey will be conducted in early July 2016.The Vermont Business Roundtable (VBR) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization of chief executive officers of Vermont’s leading private and nonprofit employers, representing geographic diversity and all major sectors of the Vermont economy. The Roundtable is committed to sustaining a sound economy and preserving Vermont’s unique quality of life by studying and making recommendations on statewide public policy issues. www.vtroundtable.org(link is external).Economic & Policy Resources, Inc. (EPR) has been providing private and public sector clients throughout the U.S. and Canada with problem-solving economic research and analysis services for more than 25 years. Our professionals bring a broad spectrum and a deep reservoir of problem-solving knowledge and experience in applied economics to each assignment. We put our capabilities and experience to work for our clients so that they have the insight and understanding necessary to move forward with confidence. EPR has successfully completed assignments throughout the United States and in eastern Canada. www.epreconomics.com(link is external).last_img read more

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first_imgSea Otter Classic, billed as ‘the world’s premiere cycling festival’, is scheduled for May 20-23, 2021 in Monterey, California.A release from the consumer show and cycling event organiser noted…‘The late spring dates are perfect for product launches and offer terrific weather. As our industry re-emerges from COVID-19 restrictions, Sea Otter promises to be the best ever unabashed celebration of cycling.‘The health and safety of our attendees is our top priority. We’ll work with Monterey County health officials to ensure all proper protocols are in place. In the event that COVID restrictions prevent our Spring event, our backup dates are scheduled for October 7-10, 2021.’www.seaotterclassic.com Relatedlast_img read more

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first_imgAndrew PattonShawnee Mission East graduate Andrew Patton is among four University of Kansas School of Medicine — Wichita students to receive the E.P. Donatelle, M.D., Student Scholarship Award this year.The award is given each year to a varying number of students who ranked highly in the third year Family Medicine Clerkship, and who rank in at least the top half of the medical school class. The award is $1,000 for each student. The award is named in honor of Donatelle, who served as the first chair of the Department of Family and Community Medicine on the Wichita campus from 1979 to 1988.Patton’s wife Bailey, originally from Overland Park, was among the eight Family Medicine students to receive scholarships this year as well. She was one of two recipients of the Monte Maska, M.D., Student Scholarship.last_img read more

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first_img24% of smartphone users budget their spending habits and expenses through website access to their account. continue reading » 51% of smartphone users rely on mobile banking 87% of U.S. adults have a mobile phone. 61% of mobile phone users are using smartphones. 69% of mobile banking users rely on mobile access to check their account before making a large purchase. Many financial consumers look to big banks for their financial needs out of sheer convenience. Around 42% of American consumers admit they chose to stay with their current banking institution over switching to a credit union because of the location and convenience factor.While you might find it difficult to add more physical locations, one convenience you can provide potential new members is a mobile optimized website. This simple service can be an effective way to compete, attract and keep members.The rise of mobile banking makes it essential to have your site as user friendly as possible. What does this do? It provides members with their financial institution’s services at their fingertips. Your members will have constant access to your services and their funds.The Consumers and Mobile Financial Services Report states: Mobile banking is projected to increase by at least 12% within the next 12 months. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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first_imgEven after three discussion sessions–each running three hours or longer–credit unions werenot “talked out” about their concerns regarding the National Credit Union Administration’s risk-based capital proposal Thursday.  And that energy and engagement, says Credit Union National Association Deputy General Counsel Mary Dunn, is what is needed going forward to ensure revisions the NCUA is contemplating will be significant enough to bring the kind of improvements credit unions need in a final regulation.At the agency’s final Listening Session of the year, held here from 1-4 p.m. (ET) Thursday, credit unions of all sizes continued to underscore that the RBC plan as written is seriously flawed and unworkable.  NCUA Chair Debbie Matz continued to assure that there will be numerous changes to the proposal before a rule is made final.She also stated, “The bottom line is, our goal is not to have a consensus. Our goal isn’t to have everybody here think it’s the best rule they’ve ever seen. Our goal is safety and soundness.”The NCUA has pledged to add time to the proposed 18-month implementation period and to adjust risk weights, especially in the areas of mortgages, member business loans, investments, credit union service organizations, and corporates credit unions. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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first_img January 15, 2012 Nancy Kinnally Regular News ‘We were alarmed when we learned of the potential loss of career children’s legal services attorneys due to the slump in IOTA revenue’ Special to the NewsThe Florida Bar Trial Lawyers Section has approved a $75,000 charitable gift to The Florida Bar Foundation for a Trial Lawyers Children’s Legal Services Fellowship. The section indicated that it might make the gift for one or two additional years.The gift will support a children’s legal services attorney whose position was subject to elimination due to a sharp decline in revenue from Florida’s Interest on Trust Accounts program.“The Trial Lawyers Section recognizes the vital role Foundation-funded children’s legal services attorneys play in protecting the rights of low-income children,” said Craig Gibbs, chair of the Trial Lawyers Section.“We were alarmed when we learned of the potential loss of career children’s legal services attorneys due to the slump in IOTA revenue, and we wanted to do our part by enabling one of the Foundation’s grantees to retain its children’s advocate.”Since the early 1990s, the Foundation has funded special annual grants for legal services to children. The Foundation’s priorities for its Children’s Legal Services Grant Program include representation of foster-care children and access to special education, medical, developmental, and mental health services that are required under law.The Foundation distributed $2.8 million to 23 legal aid programs through its Children’s Legal Services Grant Program in 2010 but had to cut those grants by 21 percent in 2011 after low interest rates brought about an 88 percent drop in annual IOTA revenue since 2008. The Foundation used funds from its reserve to prevent even deeper cuts. But with reserve funds running low and interest rates not expected to rise until 2013 or later, the Foundation anticipates that it will have to cut its total children’s legal services grant funding to $1.2 million by 2013. This will represent further cuts to the program of 42 percent over three years.Paul Doyle, director of the Foundation’s Legal Assistance for the Poor Grant Program, estimates these additional cuts will result in the loss of 10 to 12 attorneys out of 29 children’s advocates at legal aid organizations around Florida. That loss will result in a 40 percent reduction in the number of children being served — 750 fewer children than the nearly 1,900 served in 2010.Maria Henderson, president-elect of the Foundation and chair of its Legal Assistance for the Poor Grant Committee, expressed gratitude on behalf of the Foundation and its grantees for the leadership and generosity of the Trial Lawyers Section.“When you look at these numbers and recognize that each one represents a Florida child with real-life problems that only an attorney can solve, it really brings home the impact of this incredible gift from the Trial Lawyers,” Henderson said.“We are so very grateful to them, and we hope that others — whether individuals or groups — will follow their lead.”Doyle is hoping to use the gift from the Trial Lawyers and possibly others to prevent the loss of some of the state’s most effective children’s advocates, particularly those employed by smaller legal aid programs least capable of absorbing the loss of grant funds and most likely to eliminate their children’s legal services projects altogether.“A big concern we have is that once these attorneys and projects are gone, they may never come back,” Doyle said. “But if we can preserve them for two or three years until IOTA revenue rises again, we might be able to save these children’s legal services projects from extinction.”Subject to approval by the Foundation’s Legal Assistance for the Poor Grant Committee and its board of directors at the organization’s March 15-16 meeting, a lawyer from the Community Law Program in St. Petersburg will be The Florida Bar Trial Lawyers Children’s Legal Services Fellow.“With this gift from the Trial Lawyers Section, our organization will now be able to retain an advocate and a project that has made a tremendous impact on how vulnerable kids in foster care are treated in Pinellas County,” said Kimberly Rodgers, executive director of the Community Law Program. Nancy Kinnally is communications director of The Florida Bar Foundation. Trial Lawyers Section gives $75,000 to support children’s legal services lawyercenter_img Trial Lawyers Section gives $75,000 to support children’s legal services lawyerlast_img read more

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