first_imgThe Labour Party is not “a Remain party”, Jeremy Corbyn’s spokesman told journalists today following the final session of Prime Minister’s Question to feature Theresa May.At the start of the month, Labour shifted its Brexit position after affiliated trade unions agreed on a stance.The party now backs a public vote on any Brexit deal, or no deal, and has committed to campaigning for Remain against either no deal or a Tory-negotiated one “that does not protect the economy and jobs”.Asked this afternoon whether Labour had therefore become a “Remain party”, Corbyn’s spokesman replied: “No… we are not in that zone”.“We’ve never said that,” he added. “We’ve said we will campaign for Remain against a damaging Tory deal or against no deal, but there are other circumstances that could occur.”The statement implies that Labour could campaign for Brexit and against Remain if it were to negotiate its own deal, or could allow its MPs including frontbenchers to campaign for whichever side they prefer – as happened under Harold Wilson in 1975.However, it goes against what has been hinted at by shadow cabinet members such as Emily Thornberry, who has said: “No matter what deal is on the table, and which party has negotiated it, our position must be to remain in the EU and oppose any form of Brexit.”Although Labour has come to an anti-Brexit position as an opposition party, its policy in a general election has not yet been decided.According to the scenario outlined by trade unions, Labour would promise in its manifesto to negotiate a different Brexit deal – along the lines of its “jobs-first” alternative plan – that would then be “put back to the people” in another referendum.The ballot paper options should be Labour’s deal and Remain, the unions have argued, and Labour’s campaign position “should depend on the deal negotiated”.The spokesman’s comments today reflect the interaction reported on by LabourList at a recent meeting of the Love Socialism Rebuild Britain Transform Europe group of MPs.Last week, when backbench MP Alex Sobel asserted that Labour was “officially a Remain party”, LabourList heard Diane Abbott quietly tell Keir Starmer: “I’m not sure I’d agree with that.”Tags:Diane Abbott /Labour /Jeremy Corbyn /Brexit /last_img read more

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first_imgThe history of this four-unit tenancy-in-common is not disclosed. It might come as a surprise to whomever forks over the $850,000 and change it’ll take to even start the bidding that they’re making an offer on what may well be San Francisco’s oldest house. Fuentes and her family had no idea, and some of them lived here for 32 years.Well, it’s true. This home was, in fact, built by the Treat brothers, army veterans turned real-estate speculators who owned vast swaths of San Francisco, sold it off prudently, and now are remembered (or not) via Treat Avenue, which bears their name. This house first shows up on maps in 1861, but historical surveys place it at 1855 and, maybe, it’s even older than that.That’s the history that spurred us to write about the home’s pending sale earlier this week. But not only is this pioneer history left unsaid in the home’s sales pitch, so is its more recent history.To wit: Four generations of a Latino family — a nonagenarian, her retirement-age son, daughter and son-in-law, her thirtysomething city native granddaughter, and her young children — were cleared out of the place via the Ellis Act so the building could be sold for $1.5 million last year, and its new owners, an LLC, could individually flog each of its four units for the better part of $900,000 (“Fab location…”).A million miles away on 22nd Street, among the moving boxes and in a darkened room, Fuentes shakes her head. She doesn’t say anything for a little while. And, then, “No me gusta esta casa.”La familia Carcamo moved into 1266-68 Hampshire in 1985 along with a massive extended family of Salvadoran relatives. Luis and Norma Carcamo ran a restaurant in the Mission, and that’s how they met the owner of this place. They moved into an upstairs flat along with their infant daughter, Sarah. In the adjoining unit were two of Norma’s sisters — who’d buried their husbands in El Salvador — along with those sisters’ five daughters. The pack of young women were known as “The Hampshire Girls” around the neighborhood. And there were more families in more of the units. The Juarez brothers, Eddie and Oscar, lived downstairs with their dad, Leobardo, and had been there since 1970. Fuentes, Norma’s mother, arrived in 1999.Sarah Carcamo, now 34, smiles at the memories. “We had a full house,” she says. But Carcamo doesn’t view the past through a rose-colored mist. Hampshire Street could be rough in the 1980s and 1990s. “I wouldn’t go out so much. It was more dangerous then,” she says.Her 68-year-old mother Norma nods. “Peligroso.” Sarah continues. “There were a lot of gang members. You could get jumped. For like a jacket or something.” A cousin was shot dead not far off. For Sarah Carcamo, childhood memories tilt heavily toward playing inside with a small army of young relatives and friends.The family had no idea about the Treat brothers or the vintage of their home. But they knew it was old. How could they not? Oscar Juarez’s bathroom had no electricity in it. This place had the feel of a structure improvisationally reconstructed through the centuries.And the records prove it. Backing up Carcamo’s recollections, a trove of city documents reveal an aging, overstressed building with an alarming number of habitability issues and just as many notices for illegal construction. This may well be San Francisco’s oldest home, but neither the Planning Department nor the Department of Building Inspection could prevent a series of owners from taking extreme liberties in hacking up the place, sans permitting.By 2008, the house came into the possession of Washington Mutual. In December of that year, a man named Kuo Hsuan “Chuck” Chang scooped it up for $600,000.Chang is not fondly recalled by the Carcamo family, who claim he was an unresponsive landlord. And, in April 2013, he initiated an Ellis Act eviction to prod the family out of the crumbling home with the law as his cudgel.A four-year struggle ensued. Neighborhood residents recall the ambulance coming multiple times for Fuentes, who developed stress-related heart issues. But neither this, nor the senior status of multiple residents of the home, could prevent the inevitable.1266-68 Hampshire Street is dated back to 1855, and may be the city’s oldest house.Eventually, in exchange for some rent forgiveness and one final Christmas in the longtime family home, the family dropped its appeal. By Feb. 14 of last year, they cleared out. Sarah Carcamo’s nephew, 20-year-old Jose Lopez, loaded up 32 years of possessions into a truck and dropped most of it off at the city dump. And that was that.Chang, only months after moving to evict the Carcamo family and many others living on Hampshire Street (15 names appear on court papers), pleaded guilty to federal felony charges in a far-reaching bid-rigging scheme to depress the prices of foreclosed local properties bought at auction. But, in the case of 1266-68 Hampshire, it appears the law was firmly on his side.In the end, what stands out the most about the Carcamo family’s plight is how little of it stands out. “This is what a lot of contemporary San Francisco landlords do,” sums up David Tchack, one of the family’s attorneys. “These speculators come in and buy properties. They have no intention of being a landlord, and Ellis Act the tenants to turn around and sell the property.”The ejection of the Carcamo family from their historical home “was not particularly vicious,” Tchack continues. “It happens all over the city.“San Francisco’s oldest house played host to what has become San Francisco’s oldest story.The Treat brothers owned so much real estate in primordial San Francisco that the 22nd Street apartment Maria Fuentes and her family ended up in sits on land the Treats also once owned.But those days are over and, soon, the family’s time here will be, too. Sarah Carcamo lives, for now, with her husband and two daughters with her in-laws on Bryant Street. But her 94-year-old grandmother, mother, father and uncle are on borrowed time in an apartment with an expiring lease. The boxes are packed. Norma lives out of a suitcase and, like her mother, is suffering from stress issues. She’s a full-time caretaker for her mother, Fuentes, and Luis, even at age 76, works full-time as a housekeeper for a downtown hotel. Staying in the city, where they’ve lived for 40 years since leaving Central America, will be a huge fiscal challenge. The family fears Fuentes cannot make another move.Meanwhile, back on Hampshire Street, the Carcamo’s former neighbor, Arnie Warshaw, finds himself stunned at the high-end automobiles now parked along the curb. He’s been here since 1994, and his landlord has threatened to Ellis Act him, too; a junkyard-dog eviction attorney has been mentioned by name. Multicolored dots demarking evictions speckle the map on this very street. “I am,” confirms Warshaw, “deep in my own shit here.”Through it all, with his former home a memory and his current home soon to be one, Luis Carcamo keeps working. He gets up each day at 5 and is out the door at 5:45. He takes the No. 27 bus downtown and returns every night with bags of groceries from local Latino markets. “I am not stopping,” he tells his family. “Because the day I stop, I will die.” Maria Fuentes’ room is dark and the curtains are drawn. A portrait of Jesus overlooks the prone 94-year-old’s bed, and the stacked cardboard boxes holding the remaining possessions of a family uncertain where it will next turn.“No me gusta esta casa,” she tells me — I don’t like this house. Back in El Salvador, she continues, things were different. People interacted with each other. At her former home, a hop, skip, and a jump up the road, she could sit in a sunny front-yard patio and watch the world go by. Her son-in-law, Luis Carcamo, known throughout the neighborhood as “el señor de las plantas,” would be nearby sweeping the leaves and flowers from his trees off the sidewalk.For Fuentes, it seems like it’s all a million years ago and a million miles away. But it’s not. That house, an innocuous four-unit structure at 1266-68 Hampshire Street,  is a mere three-tenths of a mile from her twin bed in the front room of a home on 22nd, in the shadow of General Hospital. And it was only last year — Valentine’s Day, oddly enough — that the landlord demanded everyone be gone.The old place is back on the market in search of new buyers. “Spacious master suite w/spa-like bathroom incl. Duravit soaking tub and custom tile work,” coos the sales pitch on Sotheby’s. “Fab location, just steps from dining, entertainment, MUNI/BART and area freeways.” Tags: ellis act • evictions • gentrification • hampshire street • treat avenue Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newslettercenter_img Email Address 0%last_img read more

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first_img“A BENCHMARK has been set and now we have to stick to it…”That was the message from Paul Clough following the win at Warrington.Speaking ahead of tonight’s clash with Wakefield at Langtree Park he said: “Our attack and defence is slowly coming together and we knew a performance like the one we displayed at Warrington was coming. We knew inside us that things would come together. Fans and pundits have written us off but we could feel it bubbling and building.“We have now set our benchmark and we can’t go out against Wakefield and put in a poor performance. We have to make our home a fortress and we haven’t done that. We are building though and hopefully this will be a game when we can put a marker down. We want teams to know that every time they come to Langtree Park it will be a tough match and we won’t roll over.“I don’t believe the first games are a marker of how the season will pan out. We are nearly a quarter of the way through now and sides are beating each other. But I think the cream will rise to the top and there will be a top four bracket and under that anyone can win.“Any team can beat another – there are no guarantees of wins like the past.”Wakefield come to Langtree Park on the back of a draw at home to an impressive Salford. They’ve also pushed Huddersfield close in recent weeks.“Wakefield are a good side and Richard Agar is a good British coach – we need more of them in the game. We know what they are like on their day and they’ll come here and won’t lie down.“They’ll see our home form and think it is a neutral venue. We need to do well and step up.”Tickets for Friday’s game are on sale from the Ticket Office at Langtree Park or by calling 01744 455052. You will also be able to buy on the turnstiles.Stat Pack:St Helens have won their last three home meetings with Wakefield, with the Wildcats’ last away win against the Saints coming 22-20 at Knowsley Road on 17 July, 2009.Super League Summary:St Helens won 24Wakefield won 7Ups and Downs:St Helens highest score: 64-16 (H, 2005) (Widest margin: 60-4, H, 2005)Wakefield highest score: 41-22 (H, 2004) (also widest margin)last_img read more

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first_imgHe comes in for Alex Walmsley who suffered a neck injury in the win over Warrington last Friday.Justin Holbrook will therefore select his 17 from:1. Jonny Lomax, 2. Tommy Makinson, 3. Ryan Morgan, 4. Mark Percival, 5. Adam Swift, 6. Theo Fages, 7. Matty Smith, 9. James Roby, 10. Kyle Amor, 11. Zeb Taia, 12. Jon Wilkin, 13. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 14. Luke Douglas, 16. Luke Thompson, 17. Dom Peyroux, 18. Danny Richardson, 19. Regan Grace, 20. Matty Lees, 23. Ben Barba.Brian McDermott will choose his 17 from:1. Ashton Golding, 2. Tom Briscoe, 3. Kallum Watkins, 5. Ryan Hall, 6. Joel Moon, 7. Richie Myler, 9. Matt Parcell, 10. Brad Singleton, 11. Jamie Jones-Buchanan, 12. Carl Ablett, 14. Brad Dwyer, 15. Brett Delaney, 16. Anthony Mullally, 22. Ash Handley, 23. Jack Ormondroyd, 24. Jack Walker, 27. Cameron Smith, 28. Mikolaj Oledzki, 30. Josh Walters.The game kicks off at 7.45pm and the referee will be James Child.Tickets for the clash remain on sale from the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img read more

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first_imgSculthorpe, who made over 200 appearances for the Saints, took time to pay a visit to St Edward’s College in Merseyside to help our Saints Community Development Foundation deliver a rugby session to a Year 9 class.‘Scully’, who played in the first two Magic Weekends at the Millennium Stadium in Wales, knows all to well what these occasions mean and he gave us his thoughts ahead of Magic Weekend.“It’s been a great morning. Obviously we are at a fantastic school with some great kids and Craig [Richards] and the community team do quite a lot with this school and the surrounding area.“It’s amazing what they [the foundation] do. They give everybody the opportunity to play rugby league. Getting opportunities is special and you never know when you are going to find that next Super League superstar. Hopefully we find some budding young Saints players and fans!”“It’s a great weekend. We are the only sport in the world to have 12 sets of fans in one stadium over one weekend. It’s a great atmosphere. We’re probably spoilt at Saints with the opportunities to play in big stadiums and in front of big crowds, but some of the players that play in Super League don’t get that opportunity, so this Magic Weekend is special for them to get to play at the likes of Anfield as well as for the fans.”To find out more about the great work our Saints Community Development Foundation do in the community, including their recent Guide Dogs Appeal Launch please click here or follow them on social media.Twitter – @communitysaintsInstagram – @communitysaintsFacebook – Saints Community Development Foundation.last_img read more

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first_img00:00 00:00 html5: Video file not foundhttps://cdn.field59.com/WWAY/1505344446-39adb4b6a680f0140f331cc04cf9c1e2f36c32c0_fl9-720p.mp4 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings PENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — A Wilmington man is behind bars accused of beating up another man and then robbing him.On August 31, Harvey Wade Capps showed up at a friend’s home in Surf City. Police say that’s where Capps starting punching and choking the victim. During the altercation, Capps began assaulting the man with a wooden stick preventing him from calling 911. After the assault, Capps robbed the victim.- Advertisement – Capps is charged with 1st Degree Kidnapping, Robbery with a Dangerous Weapon, Assault with Deadly Weapon with Intent to Kill, Assault by Strangulation and Interfering with Emergency Communications.Capps was taken into custody Tuesday by the US Marshals Service and booked into the New Hanover County Jail under a $20,000 secured bond.His first appearance is Wednesday in Pender County District Court.last_img read more

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first_img There will be modest increases to meal plans (from 3.3% to 6%) and room rates (average of 3%).Overall, the cost of attendance for the average undergraduate student on campus will increase by less than 2%.In-state graduate students can expect their tuition to increase by 2%, while those from out-of-state will see a 4% increase. All revenues generated by the increases will be used to enhance graduate tuition remissions.Related Article: Gadsden, Cacok power UNC Wilmington past Allen 113-74 for first winThere will be a non-mandatory fee increase of $25 for nursing students, which covers the increase in the cost of Pre-NCLEX testing.The $150 graduate orientation fee in the Cameron School of Business will be eliminated.There will be differential tuition increases for the Professional MBA program, the Master of Science in Data Science, the online Master of Science in Finance and Investment Management, and the online Master of Science in Business Analytics. All revenues generated by the increases will be used to enhance the programs.The tuition changes still require approval by the Board of Governors.  All changes would go into effect in Fall 2018. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — The UNC Wilmington Board of Trustees met Monday morning to discuss changes to tuition, fees, and room and board for the 2018-2019 school year.There will be no tuition increases for undergraduates and no increases in mandatory student fees.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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first_imgLELAND, NC (WWAY) –  On December 4th, H2GO board members voted to prohibit media requests for comment from the utility from any employee other than then-commissioner, Jeff Gerken. When commissioners met for their monthly meeting in February, one commissioner challenge that gag order.The order read:“Do not discuss, or allow other staff to discuss, any matters of the sanitary district with the media, and to direct all media inquiries regarding Brunswick Regional Water and Sewer H2GO to Commissioner Jeff Gerken.”- Advertisement – Commissioner Rodney McCoy asked that the wording be changed. He says since the order was made, employees have felt constricted to talk to anyone publicly.The board decided to work on re-wording except for topics on the transfer to Belville or the pending lawsuit. Commissioner Trudy Trombley drafted a motion for changing the wording, but Chairman Gerken and McCoy agreed to table it and draft a change to bring up at the next meeting.“I did not think about editing it myself, but I look forward to putting pen to paper,” said McCoy. “And I’d like to get something written so that it will protect H2GO as far as litigation portion is concerned, but I also want to have the employees feel free to do their job.”Related Article: Workout with the family at Leland Health & Fitness DayThat meeting is set for March 20th. Prior to that, board members are expected to meet with Brunswick county leaders to talk about the water quality results from the county’s new small-scale reverse osmosis system.last_img read more

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first_img00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings COLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — The man charged with murdering State Trooper Kevin Conner will now face the death penalty. A judge approved the request from the District Attorney to try Chauncy Askew for capital murder.Since Conner’s murder on October 17, District Attorney Jon David has made it clear that his office will seek the death penalty.- Advertisement – After the hearing, Askew’s mother shared what she thinks about that ruling.“I had tears in my eyes and I had to drop my head down. I’ve never seen that before,” said Early Gowans, Askew’s mother.Clad in a bulletproof vest , Askew walked into an emotional Columbus County courtroom. The family of Kevin Conner, the trooper Askew is accused of killing, were seen crying nearby.Related Article: 911 caller: Suspect and girlfriend ‘just ran’ during trooper-involved shootingAskew’s mother, also upset, listened while David argued why her son should be put to death for the crime.“He might have been around with who did it, there is more than one person in it. I don’t think he should take all the blame on him when somebody else had something to do with it. But I don’t think my son should be involved in it alone. I think the other party that was in there need to be treated the same way my son is,” said Gowans.Gowans is not saying her son is totally innocent, but she also believes the death penalty should not be in play.Askew’s attorney wanted further tests done to decided if Askew is, in fact, competent to stand trial. Gowan’s explains why.“I knew he had brain damage because he had been in a car accident before. So I just hope they bring all that before the judge,” said Gowans.But David says the aggravating factors for a capital case and a motive are clear.After listening to both the prosecution and defense, the judge ruled in favor of the DA, to try this case as a capital case.Askew’s family says they want to make sure the trial is fair for both sides.“Seeking the death penalty for my son is wrong until they find him guilty, that my son did it. But I don’t think my son did that,” said Gowans.The other man charged in Trooper Conner’s death is Raheem Davis. He was charged with murder, but that charge was dropped.Davis is now charged with felony accessory after the fact of first degree murder.last_img read more

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first_imgMONROE, NC (AP) — Many of the 10 Republicans who want to be North Carolina’s newest U.S. House member plan to discuss their differences.Candidates for the GOP nomination in the 9th Congressional District hold a debate Tuesday night in Monroe. Candidate forums have already been held in Fayetteville and Charlotte ahead of the May 14 primary election.- Advertisement – Early, in-person and mail-in voting has been under way.Catawba College professor Michael Bitzer analyzed the early voters and found that half are 65 or older. More are from Mecklenburg County than any of the district’s other seven counties.The special election was ordered because Mark Harris, the Republican in last year’s race against Democrat Dan McCready, used a political operative accused of collecting mail-in ballots.Related Article: More than 1,100 ballots added to races in New Hanover CountyHarris didn’t run again. McCready faces no primary opponent.(Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)last_img read more

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