first_imgPatrick Sturm, Brennan Lumpkin, and Erin Viets play all the roles in SM South’s production of The Complete Works of Shakespeare Abridged.Three Shawnee Mission South seniors have taken on a big challenge: Presenting all 37 of William Shakespeare’s plays in about an hour and a half.The school’s theatre department on Thursday will debut The Complete Works of Shakespeare Abridged, featuring SM South students Patrick Sturm, Brennan Lumpkin, and Erin Viets. The trio will work in “extremely condensed” versions of all the plays featuring a variety of techniques, from short raps to football play reenactments.Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Shawnee Mission South High School Auditorium, 5800 W. 107th Street, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.Tickets cost $10 at the door, or are free with a valid SM South student ID.The production is directed by Skip Gordon.last_img read more

Posted in gtzriikh

first_imgPSC Billabong GolfWed., 24th June Green Valley Haven Consultants Monthly TrophyThe Haven Consultants Monthly Trophy was played for Wednesday at Green Valley golf course in what started out as perfect conditions – until about 11.30 when a storm hit the course. Although it didn’t last that long it put a lot of water on the players. Please Support Pattaya MailNow, when the bar can open, then we will have the presentations of the trophies for the last 4 months plus the annual event which will be played on the last Wednesday in July.Green Valley is in great condition at the moment and with the amount of rain it has had the fairways and greens are just fantastic. It was a stroke round as usual and the scoring was very ordinary today with a count back for 3rd place between Peter Terry and Bob StAubin both with a net 75 with Peter prevailing to take that spot. Loading…Sponsored Content8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthTop 10 Tiniest Phones Ever MadeTop 9 Scariest Haunted Castles In Europe6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True We must thank Brian Chapman the CEO of Haven Consultants for his continued support for this event and the Billabong golf club.center_img Promoted ContentThese TV Characters Proved That Any 2 People Can Bury The Hatchetbrainberries6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanesbrainberries10 Risky Jobs Some Women DobrainberriesBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldbrainberriesLong Live Her Majesty Queen Sirikit of The Queen Mother – Pattaya Mail7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Valuebrainberries9 Iconic Roles That Could Have Been Played By Different Actorsbrainberries20 Completely Unexpected Facts About ‘The Big Bang Theory’brainberriesThailand focuses on Vietnamese second spread of COVID-19 cases – Pattaya M…The Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldbrainberriesCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Waybrainberries5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksbrainberriesFake brand-name goods worth over 100 million baht seized in Bangkok – Patt…18 Beautiful Cities That Are Tourist Magnetsbrainberries7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Betterbrainberries 2nd place went to Barry Copestake with a net 73, and the Haven Trophy was picked up by Glyn Davies who has always maintained that whilst ever this tournament is played here he would never get to see the trophy or shirt. Well today was his day with a net 72.There were two 2s coming from Bob Staubin and William Macey.last_img read more

Posted in kiyxelbq

first_img Sport EN 15/01/2015 Instead, Diego Simeone’s boys can earn revenge for the beating Barcelona gave them at the Camp Nou last weekend, provided no shocks occur in the second leg of Barcelona’s game against Elche, the first of which they won 5-0. Goals from Sergio Ramos and Cristiano Ronaldo were not enough to help Carlo Ancelotti’s men make it through and set up a pair of Clasico fixtures. Barcelona are set to face Atletico Madrid in the next round of the Copa del Rey, after the La Liga Champions eased through against Real Madrid. CET After a 2-0 win in the first leg of their last 16, Atletico striker Fernando Torres netted twice, one in either half, to help his team reach the quarter-finals. Upd. at 21:52 The Rojiblanco were seen off 3-1, thanks to goals from Neymar, Luis Suarez and then Lionel Messi.last_img read more

Posted in pzkvckff

first_img He also refused to agree with suggestions Ronaldo’s style of play has become more limited in recent months, pointing out that the Portuguese forward produced a good performance in Catalonia. “But we will not give up [in the title race]. We did very well in the first half and we need to try and play that well for 90 minutes. Upd. at 01:11 “Ronaldo’s game was very complete,” Ancelotti opined. “The league is not over. Barça have an advantage like we did before and anything can happen.” CET Sam Marsden 23/03/2015 Carlo Ancelotti lamented Real Madrid’s inability to play at the same level for 90 minutes after they were beaten by Barcelona on Sunday night. “He had a lot of chances, created chances, was always dangerous, hit the woodwork…. So, no, I do not think we are seeing a different Cristiano.” They had got back into the game through Cristiano Ronaldo and ended the first half in the ascendency. “We felt we did well for an hour, then fell away in the final 30 minutes,” Ancelotti told a press conference after the game. Pressed on whether Madrid will now put more effort into winning their 11th Champions League, the Italian insisted his players are still focused on achieving success on both fronts. Gareth Bale had the ball in the net only to see the lineman’s flag raised and the same player shot wide when the ball fell to him in the penalty area after a corner. However, after Luis Suarez scored at the beginning of the second half, it was Barca who took control and moved four points clear at the top of La Liga.last_img read more

Posted in jeljoqyb

first_img CEST Jose Mourinho has surprised many with quotes highlighting the quality of Leo Messi. The Portuguese coach came out with them ahead of Manchester United’s game against Burnley. A little while after he seemed to make peace with Pep Guardiola, whom he hugged at Old Trafford.  Upd. at 19:51 A quote that is more surprising when you consider the rivalry he had against Messi and Barcelona while coach of Chelsea and then Real Madrid. In a press conference Mourinho said: “Within five years, Messi will be 34. And we will all cry because he will be 34.”center_img Sport EN 28/10/2016 Time has showed that Mourinho prefers Messi to Ronaldo.last_img read more

Posted in kunijngs

first_imgNorthwestern State’s Kellye Kincannon had back-to-back home runs in the second-inning to lead the Lady Demons to a 9-4 victory against in-state rival Louisiana Tech Wednesday evening. In other softball action, Nicholls used a five-run third inning to pull away from Southern as the Colonels claimed a 10-5 victory on the road. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi fell to Texas, Central Arkansas lost a shootout 12-8 to Oklahoma State while UTSA swept Houston Baptist in a doubleheader in non-conference action.  Northwestern State 9, Louisiana Tech 4RUSTON, La. – Back-to-back homers from Kellye Kincannon and a massive five-run second inning gave Northwestern State a 9-4 victory over in-state rival Louisiana Tech Wednesday evening at the Lady Techster Softball Complex. | Read MoreNicholls 10, Southern 5BATON ROUGE, La. – Nicholls used a five-run third inning to pull away from the Southern Lady Jaguars as the Colonels claimed a 10-5 victory on Wednesday night at Lady Jaguar Field. The win improves Nicholls’ record to 10-24 on the year, while Southern remains with only one win for the season (1-27). | Read MoreTexas 8, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 0AUSTIN, Texas – Texas scored three runs in the opening frame and five runs in the third to pick up an 8-0 victory over Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. The Longhorns outhit the Islanders 11-2 in five innings at Red & Charline McCombs Field. | Read MoreOklahoma State 12, Central Arkansas 8STILLWATER, Okla. – Central Arkansas took a break from conference play on Wednesday, heading to Stillwater, Oklahoma to battle the Oklahoma State Cowgirls. The Bears and the Cowgirls had a back-and-forth battle, with the lead changing four times and the teams combining for 20 runs on 21 hits, with Oklahoma State picking up the 12-8 win. | Read MoreUTSA 10, Houston Baptist 6UTSA 12, Houston Baptist 4SAN ANTONIO, Texas – UTSA hit 11 home runs in two games en route to a doubleheader sweep past Houston Baptist, 10-6 and 12-6 in five innings, Wednesday evening from Roadrunner field. | Read Morelast_img read more

Posted in icxggaqr

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Captive Breeding, Commentary, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Extinction, Mammals, Megafauna, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife center_img The presence of near-extinct Sumatran rhinos in Indonesian Borneo was for a long time the stuff of legend, with no hard evidence to support it. Still, wildlife experts spared no effort to investigate every scrap of information.Those rumors eventually bore fruit with the capture of two individuals by conservationists in the past two years. The first rhino, however, died of injuries sustained before its capture.Today, a facility in eastern Borneo holds the other rhino, a female, with around-the-clock care from vets and experts, as part of a wider effort to kick-start a captive-breeding program.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. In 1982, an orangutan researcher working in Indonesian Borneo wrote to a colleague at the biology department at the National University in Jakarta. He told of meeting a traditional-medicine trader at the market in Pangkalan Bun, a city in Central Kalimantan province.“A whole Sumatran rhino head is immersed in coconut oil in a basin,” Muhammad Boang wrote. “That oil is later put into little finger-size bottles, and sold for 5,000 rupiah,” nearly $8 at the time. “It’s believed to cure various ailments. According to the trader, the rhino came from the forest in Tanjung Puting,” at the time a newly established national park.Three decades later, environmentalists from the Titian Foundation would once again get information of Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in Indonesian Borneo, this time in East Kalimantan province. In 2012, the foundation’s founder, Darmawan Liswanto, received reports of rhino sightings in the Mahakam Ulu foothills upstream of the Mahakam River. The area includes the Kelian Lestari protected forest, and was formerly a mining site spanning 67 square kilometers (26 square miles).The Indonesian part of Borneo island, known as Kalimantan, is shown in red. Image courtesy of Gunkarta/Wikimedia Commons.The presence of Sumatran rhinos in Indonesian Borneo was for a long time the stuff of legend, with no hard evidence to support it. The species was considered locally extinct, until WWF-Indonesia found signs of a rhino there in 2013.Early that year, an orangutan survey team from the NGO found fresh tracks believed to be from a rhino. The discovery prompted more intensive surveys, including setting up a camera trap and interviewing residents across West Kutai district, East Kalimantan province.The interviews indicated that there were pockets of potentially viable habitat for Sumatran rhinos in East Kalimantan. The surveyors identified these as Habitat Pockets 1, 2 and 3. Field surveys in Habitat Pockets 1 and 3 found signs of a rhino presence, including footprints, droppings, half-eaten vegetation, mangled branches, scuffed tree bark, and mud wallows. In mid-2013, a camera trap recorded a rhino in Habitat Pocket 1.On Oct. 2 that year, the forestry minister announced the rhino discovery at the Asian Rhino Range States Meeting taking place in Lampung, Sumatra. In 2014, a series of systematic and collaborative surveys were begun to uncover the rhinos’ population and distribution.In October 2014, locals reported finding rhino tracks in Habitat Pocket 3. The area was already under threat from human activity, including hunting, logging, clearing, burning, mining, and cultivation of oil palms.“The results of a 2015 survey by WWF-Indonesia and Mulawarman University indicate there are more than 15 Sumatran rhinos in Habitat Pocket 1,” Yuyun Kurniawan, from WWF-Indonesia, said in a Population and Habitat Viability Assessment (PHVA) presentation that year.Locals had also reported a rhino presence in Habitat Pocket 2 since 2013. But surveys by WWF-Indonesia and the Alliance for Forest Conservation (ALeRT) from 2016 to 2018 turned up no evidence of rhinos there.Since 2013, meanwhile, there were three rhinos known to live in Habitat Pocket 3, all females: Najaq, Pahu and Tenaik (Pahu’s calf). But conditions are increasingly dire for the rhinos there, surrounded by mines and oil palm plantations.Najaq was captured on March 12, 2016. She died on April 5, from wounds inflicted by a snare. There are no signs at present of Tenaik, believed to be about 5 years old. A Rhino Protection Unit (RPU) set up by WWF-Indonesia, the Indonesian Rhino Foundation (YABI) and the East Kalimantan conservation agency (BKSDA) found 250 snares and traps in a three-month period in 2016, set up to hunt wild boars and deer.Najaq before her death in April 2016. Image by Ari Wibowo/WWF-Indonesia.The morning of Nov. 25, 2018, was a memorable one for the Sumatran rhino conservation community. That was the day Pahu was successfully and safely captured. Three days later, she was transferred to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary (SRS) in Kelian Lestari.Wiratno, the conservation chief at the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, said the translocation was an important first step in the effort to boost conservation of the Sumatran rhino. He said the government was fully committed not just to the capture of rhinos for conservation and captive breeding, but also to the protection of their habitats.“Our hope is that the population of the species will recover,” he said.At the Kelian Lestari SRS, a team of veterinarians and experts are keeping close tabs on Pahu, ensuring she remains safe and healthy in her new environment.The Sumatran rhino is one of the mammals most at threat from extinction. With a population of fewer than 100 individuals, the species is at a critical point. For years it was hunted and saw its habitat destroyed. The population that remains is now scattered, making it difficult for individuals to find each other to mate.As a result of this prolonged isolation, the captive-breeding effort itself poses a risk to the fertility of the rhinos. Whether the species survives depends on the conservationists’ ability to capture and transfer the rhinos to facilities specially built for their care.The Kelian Lestari SRS where Pahu now lives features a high diversity of plants. These include plants whose leaves or fruit the rhinos like to eat, such as blackboard tree (Alstonia scholaris), Vitex pubescens, bandicoot berry (Leea indica), purple simpoh (Dillenia excelsa), native hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus), and different kinds of fig trees (Ficus spp).Any rhinos kept here will only be given food that can be found in the nearby forest. Additional food is limited to jackfruit (Artocarpus integra) or rubber fig (Ficus elastica) leave, which can be obtained from nearby villages. Even then, the SRS staff have to ensure that the leaves don’t come from farms or plantations that use pesticides. Rhinos become susceptible to disease if their diet isn’t diverse enough or is contaminated with pesticides.If, over the next year, conservationists are unable to capture and move any of the rhinos in Habitat Pocket 1 to the Kelian Lestari SRS, an important decision needs to be made. One of the males currently at the Way Kambas SRS in Lampung, Sumatra, must immediately be sent to Kelian Lestari to mate with Pahu. It’s important that this happen for the Sumatran rhino conservation program to work as hoped.Pahu was captured from a forest in East Kalimantan by conservationists in an effort to protect the near-extinct species. Image courtesy of Sugeng Hendratmo/Sumatran Rhino Rescue.Haerudin R. Sadjudin is a senior rhino researcher who has been involved in rhino conservation program for over 40 years in Indonesia.The story was first published on our Indonesian site on Dec. 2, 2018.Editor’s note: For an alternative view of the capture of Najaq, see this 2016 commentary by Erik Meijaard.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor Deforestation in the village of Cibulao on the outskirts of the Indonesian capital, Jakarta, left it prone to droughts in the dry season and landslides in the rainy season.That changed in the early 2000s when a local tea plantation worker named Kiryono began replanting the slopes with seeds foraged from the nearby forest.Among those seeds were coffee seeds taken from wild coffee trees, and with training and the help of his family, Kiryono today produces some of the most prized coffee in Indonesia.The village is also greener now, thanks to Kiryono’s replanting efforts, and the local farmers’ cooperative hopes to expand on that work by applying for the right to manage a larger area of land. CIBULAO, Indonesia — A light drizzle falls outside Kiryono’s home as he peers at the thermostat on a coffee roaster. The 39-year-old’s green robusta harvest absorbs the heat in the initial part of the process, before the beans become exothermic as the temperature rises.“I’ve never encountered difficulty in selling coffee, even though the price is higher than other coffees,” Kiryono tells Mongabay. “It’s probably because I pursue quality over quantity.”Kiryono’s homespun roasting operation has catalyzed change in what was still, in the early 2000s, a fairly typical village on the southeastern outskirts of metropolitan Jakarta, the capital. Today Cibulao is greener and more prosperous, in large part due to its reputation as a cradle for a cup of Java.“This coffee is for orders from Jakarta,” Kiryono says. “We get a lot of requests but not all have been fulfilled.”Almost two decades ago, Kiryono, then in his early 20s, saw the village suffer through droughts as the water tabled groaned under the pressures of the dry season. Local deforestation had also shaved the landscape of forest cover, which brought landslides in the rainy season from saturated topsoil.These challenges prompted Kiryono to draw up a plan to begin replanting the slopes here in Cibulao with local tree species.But he lacked access to the capital needed to purchase seeds wholesale, which prevented him from tackling the project at scale. So for two years, Kiryono trudged back and forth from the forest to retrieve seeds. Among the seeds he planted were those from wild coffee plants he encoutered in the forest.“Every day there was a target for planting [a number of seeds],” he says. “There was only one goal: to repair the environment.”Kiryono examines his robusta coffee beans. Image by Donny Iqbal for Mongabay.Kiryono encountered skepticism from some in the community who considered the project wishful thinking. Moreover, Kiryono was new to the complexities of coffee planting (at the time he was a laborer at a nearby tea plantation).In spite of these barriers, Kiryono pressed on with the help of his father, uncle and younger brother. The men planted hundreds of seeds in increments, opting for composting and manure over more expensive fertilizers.But even as the other trees took root and flourished, the coffee trees they planted refused to bear fruit.“The failure at that time was a heavy blow. I took some time out,” he says. “My efforts alone were evidently not enough.”It was not until years later that a development organization working out of the agricultural university in a nearby city came to Kiryono with a proposal.In 2009, the Regional Planning and Development Study Center (P4W) at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB) began to conduct studies of the local topography while offering training to Kiryono.The trees soon responded by bearing fruit. Guests from the community then started arriving at Kiryono’s house to learn about coffee-making. Buyers even came directly to his house.The local economy in Cibulao has now changed almost beyond recognition. In 2016, coffee from the village won the Indonesian Specialty Coffee Contest.A dozen other residents of the village have since formed a cooperative, the Cibulao Hijau Forest Farmer Group (KTH).Now the group is designing a framework to bring in coffee enthusiasts to witness and understand the nuances of the entire process, from the field to the metallic roaster inside Kiryono’s home.At the beginning of this year the KTH farmers petitioned the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry to grant 75 households in Cibulao the right to manage 611 hectares (1,510 acres) of land for 35 years.The farmers hope this will secure not just their future, but offer better protection for an area where they still remember the water shortages in the dry months and the landslides in the wet season.“Without raising awareness,” Kiryono says, “the goal of maintaining the balance of nature will never be sustainable.”Banner: Kiryono at work in Cibulao. Image by Donny Iqbal for Mongabay.This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and published here on our Indonesian site on March 27, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Coffee, Community Development, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Deforestation, Development, Drought, Ecotourism, Environment, Farming, Forestry, Forests, Green, Green Business, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Rainforests, Reforestation, Sustainable Development, Tourism, Tropical Forests, Water, Water Crisis, Water Scarcity center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Posted in kiyxelbq

first_imgArticle published by Rebecca Kessler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Bears, Big Cats, Environment, Governance, Green, Human Rights, Politics, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img A court in Tehran last week delivered a guilty verdict in the case of eight Iranian conservationists accused of spying, with sentences ranging from four to 10 years.The eight were all affiliated with the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation, a Tehran-based conservation organization that works to save the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) and other species. The charges appear to be related to allegations that the conservationists used wildlife camera traps for the purpose of espionage.The eight conservationists have been imprisoned since their arrests in January 2018. A colleague arrested at the same time died in custody.Rights groups and conservation organizations have condemned the verdict, alleging serious flaws in the judicial process. A court in Tehran last week delivered a guilty verdict in the case of eight Iranian conservationists accused of spying, with sentences ranging from four to 10 years. The eight were all affiliated with the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation (PWHF), a Tehran-based conservation organization that works to save the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) and other species.PWHF founder Morad Tahbaz and program manager Niloufar Bayani both received 10-year sentences, while cheetah researcher Houman Jowkar and biologist Taher Ghadirian were sentenced to eight years each. Coordinator Sepideh Kashani, big cat conservationist Amirhossein Khaleghi Hamidi and former PWHF staffer Sam Radjabi received six years, while Abdolreza Kouhpayeh, a conservationist and wildlife photographer, received four years.Eight conservationists affiliated with the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation were recently convicted of spying in Iran. Top row, from left: Niloufar Bayani, Taher Ghadirian, Houman Jowkar and Sepideh Kashani. Bottom row, from left: Amirhossein Khaleghi Hamidi, Abdolreza Kouhpayeh, Sam Radjabi and Morad Tahbaz. Images courtesy of AnyHopeForNature.The conservationists have been imprisoned since their arrests in January 2018. PWHF’s volunteer managing director, Kavous Seyed-Emami, a Canadian-Iranian sociology professor, was arrested at the same time. He died the following month in Evin Prison in Tehran. Iranian authorities claimed the death was a suicide and have not permitted an independent investigation, according to Seyed-Emami’s family.Four of the group had faced charges of “sowing corruption on earth,” which can carry the death penalty, but these were dropped in October. According to New York-based NGO Human Rights Watch, the eight were ultimately convicted of “collaborating with the enemy state of the United States.” The charges appear to be related to allegations that the conservationists used wildlife camera traps for the purpose of espionage.The sentences, handed down on Nov. 20 and 23, came amid a sweeping internet blackout and protests around the country, precipitated by an increase in fuel prices. The Center for Human Rights in Iran, an advocacy group based in New York, reported that the eight were given the verdicts verbally, rather than in writing, which it described as “a common practice in politically motivated cases in Iran.”A close relative of one of the jailed PWHF staff who requested anonymity due to the sensitivity of the situation told Mongabay that the conservationists and their supporters were reacting to the verdicts with “despair, and yet determination.” The relative noted that the conservationists have 20 days to lodge an appeal. “From the conservation community, we hope to see very strong reactions,” the relative said. “This is now a conviction and no longer a projected outcome, which was something that some parts of the conservation community was waiting for to react on. Here it is. This could be any one of them working to save our planet … This should be a real serious alarm.”The Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation’s late managing director, Kavous Seyed-Emami, died in prison shortly after his arrest in January 2018. Image courtesy of the Seyed-Emami family.Foreign and domestic responsesThe group’s jailing in 2018 met with international criticism, and news of the verdict and sentences sparked a fresh outcry from human rights and conservation organizations, including the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society, Human Rights Watch, and the IUCN.“Sentencing innocent wildlife conservationists to long jail sentences in the absence of evidence is a travesty of justice and a violation of multiple human rights,” said David Boyd, the U.N. Special Rapporteur on human rights and the environment, in a statement emailed to Mongabay. “In the context of a global biodiversity crisis the work of these conservationists should be admired, not condemned. An appeal should be expedited and their sentences should be overturned.”The secretary-general of the Geneva-based human rights NGO the International Commission of Jurists, Sam Zarifi, said that while his group hadn’t been able to monitor the case due to access restrictions, it did appear there were flaws in the judicial process. “Based on publicly available material, their trial at Branch 15 of the Revolutionary Court suffered from serious due process problems, including defendants’ lack of access to lawyers of their choosing, lack of access to the indictment and underlying evidence, and claims by the defendants that they were tortured in order to provide false confessions,” Zarifi told Mongabay by email.“There is no publicly available indication that the defendants’ claims were investigated properly. So looking at this case from the outside — which is unfortunately as close as we can get — their trial doesn’t seem to have been a fair or credible process,” he said.A critically endangered Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus), of which only 50 remain, all of them in Iran. Image by Tasnim News Agency via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0).The U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP) issued a statement voicing deep concern and calling for clemency. UNEP also confirmed that convicted PWHF program manager Bayani had been a UNEP consultant between 2012 and 2017. Bayani and PWHF founder Tahbaz, a successful businessman, were reportedly also charged with “gaining illegitimate income,” with Bayani reportedly ordered by the court to repay the salary she had earned consulting with UNEP.The case has also raised questions domestically. In November 2018, more than 1,100 conservationists in Iran signed an open letter addressed to the head of the judiciary. They emphasized that over some 20 years of professional interactions the detained conservationists were only known “for serving [their] country and trying their best to protect its nature.”Senior government officials have gone on record saying that investigations had failed to turn up evidence that the detained were spies.Political connectionsWhile no evidence has been made public, one key line of pursuit during interrogations was reportedly the link between PWHF and the founder of the world’s largest big cat conservation organization, Panthera, headquartered in New York. PWHF staff occasionally worked alongside experts from Panthera, using camera traps to monitor cheetah populations. The conservation community has spoken out strongly against the notion that low-quality motion-sensor camera traps could serve any espionage purpose.The founder of Panthera, U.S. billionaire Thomas Kaplan, is active in and provides funding to United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI), a New York-based lobby group that advocates for tough sanctions and regime change in Iran. The group pushed for the U.S. to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal, formally the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), which it did in May 2018.In late 2017, PWHF staff reportedly sought to distance themselves from Panthera following a speech by Kaplan that comprised his first major public show of support for UANI. A letter from PWHF to Panthera voiced “alarm and consternation” at his political activities. Panthera has issued no response to the arrests or verdict and did not respond to requests from Mongabay for comment.Conservation workPWHF’s central mission was the conservation of the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah. Just 50 remain in the world, all of them in Iran. Jowkar, the jailed PWHF cheetah researcher, led the latest IUCN assessment of the species, in 2008. He, Ghadirian and Khaleghi Hamidi were members of the IUCN/SSC Cat Specialist Group, and PWHF had been instrumental in highlighting the plight of the species through a project funded by Iran’s Department of Environment and the U.N. Development Programme (UNDP).The jailed conservationists also worked to protect other species and to raise awareness on environmental issues in a country beset by drought. Ghadirian, PWHF’s consultant on large mammals from 2014 to 2017, undertook population surveys of leopards, wolves and bears using camera traps, tracking, urine and other signs. He worked with herders to find solutions to human-animal conflict.On one of the few phone calls permitted to loved ones from prison, Ghadirian reportedly asked what was going on in his absence with a project on Baluchistan bears (Ursus thibetanus gedrosianus), a critically endangered subspecies of the Asian black bear. He and another biologist had been working in southern Iran to raise awareness of the importance of conserving the species, reduce human-bear conflict and livestock depredation, and push for the establishment of wildlife corridors and a protected area.A Baluchistan bear (Ursus thibetanus gedrosianus) in Iran. The bears are a critically endangered subspecies of the Asian black bear. Image by Ruholah.ahmadi via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).David Garshelis, a bear specialist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and member of the IUCN/SSC Bear Specialist Group, said the research was showing real promise. “Before they started, it wasn’t actually clear that there were still bears in this area,” he said.“[Ghadirian] was very concerned about both sides of the equation, both people and bears,” and sought to address conservation issues holistically, said Garshelis. “He was in elementary schools giving programs, then talking to people in the field — he was trying to address it from every possible level.”Garshelis said he had hoped to visit and work with Ghadirian on the bear project. “We were thinking things might ease up, sometime in the future,” he said.In addition to the jail time, the eight are all reportedly banned from working in the conservation sector for two years from the conclusion of their sentences.A landscape in the Turkmen Sahra region of northeastern Iran. Image by Alireza Javaheri via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_img30 May 2013 South African botanist William Bond from the University of Cape Town has been elected as a foreign associate of the independent United States National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in recognition of his achievements in original research. Bond, from UCT’s Department of Biological Sciences, joins conservation biologist Richard Cowling from the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in Port Elizabeth as the only two current South African foreign associates of the NAS, UCT announced last week. The NAS is a non-profit society of distinguished scholars in their fields established by an Act of Congress by Abraham Lincoln in 1863 to advance research and knowledge in scientific fields. It provides science and technology advice to members, who are elected to membership by their peers for contributions to research. There are almost 2 200 members, of which 400 are foreign associates and 200 are Nobel Laureates. Foreign associates are non-voting members of the Academy with citizenship outside the US. Bond is the fifth African scientist to be elected to the NAS. Kenya’s Meave Leakey was the only other African to be elected as a foreign associate this year. Leakey is an ecologist with a research interest in the processes that control large-scale vegetation; in particular, his research has looked at how wildfires shape global vegetation. He is an A-rated researcher with South Africa’s National Research Foundation. “African vegetation is particularly interesting and challenging to study because of the complex interplay between climate, fire, large mammal herbivores, people and increasing carbon dioxide, the hidden hand of global change,” Bond said. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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