first_img Donegal hoteliers enjoy morale boost as bookings increase WhatsApp Exclusive: Donegal woman has no bad feelings towards hijacker Facebook Today is the 30th anniversary of Eddie Fullerton’s murder Google+ 45 new social homes to be built in Dungloe Twitter Hospitalisations rise as Donnelly suggests masks will stay ’til autumn Facebook News By News Highland – February 27, 2013 center_img Google+ WhatsApp Previous articleNo extra jail time for man who hijacked Donegal woman’s carNext articleVideo: Jim McGuinness encourages people to ‘speak out’ if they have a problem News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Pinterest Disruption to cancer service will increase mortality – Oncologist The Donegal woman who had her jeep hijacked while her nine-year-old child was in the back seat says she doesn’t have any bad feeling towards the man who was found responsible.Bernadette Moran, the wife of the Donegal football team doctor, managed to pull her daughter from the vehicle before 21-year-old Christopher Coakley accelerated away.He was this week sentenced to three years in prison for the crime which will run concurrently with a sentence he is already serving for a firearm offence.Bernie Moran was in Dublin with her three children for an All-Ireland quarter-final match in Croke Park when her jeep was hijacked.She spoke earlier on the ‘Shaun Doherty Show’ and revealed that she didn’t tell her husband what had happened until after Donegal had won the match:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/bernr1pmHIJACK.mp3[/podcast] Twitter Consultation launched on proposal to limit HGV traffic in Cladylast_img read more

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first_imgMORE: College basketball schedule 2019-20Cunningham made the announcement via Twitter on Tuesday: Cade Cunningham, the No. 2 player from the class of 2020, announced Tuesday night that he is committing to Oklahoma State.Cunningham is a consensus five-star recruit and is the highest-rated point guard out of his class, per 247Sports’ Composite rankings. The Texas native sizes up at 6-7 and 215 pounds and is a product of Montverde Academy in Florida. I am who I am, and who I’m not, I will never be. pic.twitter.com/FDDZBd7KRJ— Cade Cunningham (@CadeCunningham_) November 5, 2019Oklahoma State coach Mike Boynton did all he could to secure the prized recruit, and his efforts paid off. Boynton hired Cunningham’s brother, Cannen, as an assistant coach in June. The hiring immediately skyrocketed Oklahoma State’s chances of landing the likely one-and-done star.In addition to Montverde, Cunningham also played in the Nike EYBL circuit. He averaged 25.1 points, 6.6 rebounds and 5.2 assists per game and shot nearly 60 percent from the floor en route to being named the EYBL’s most valuable player.Cunningham selected the Cowboys over Florida, Kentucky, North Carolina and Washington.last_img read more

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first_img Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz fans yell during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) grabs Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) as they celebrate winning Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) gets the ball stripped away by Houston Rockets guard Gerald Green (14) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Utah Jazz Dancers dance before the Jazz play the Houston Rockets in Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) holds his face after Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) elbowed him in the mouth during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) gets to the basket for two during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Houston Rockets center Clint Capela (15) leaps into the air as he saves the ball during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Utah Jazz at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Jazz fans scream their appreciation after Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) scores during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Grid View Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) loses control of the ball as he tries to move around Houston Rockets guard Austin Rivers (25) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz fans cheer during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs agains the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Steve Griffin, Deseret News Shots finally start falling for Jazz in fourth-quarter rally that keeps Utah alive in series with Houston Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) moves around Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) shoots over Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Steve Griffin, Deseret News Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) shoots as Houston Rockets guard Gerald Green (14) guards him during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) loses control of the ball as he tries to move around Houston Rockets guard Austin Rivers (25) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Jazz fans scream their appreciation after Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) scores during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) throws down a monster dunk during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) shoots during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) reacts after an offensive foul is called on Utah Jazz forward Royce O'Neale (23) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) shoots in front of Houston Rockets forward Kenneth Faried (35) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz fans react as the Jazz are winning in the final minutes of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) crashes into Houston Rockets guard Eric Gordon (10) and Houston Rockets center Clint Capela (15) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Houston Rockets forward Kenneth Faried (35) looks up during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Utah Jazz at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) dunks the ball after stealing it away from the Houston Rockets in Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Related Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) screams with excitement as he leads the Jazz to a big win during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) reacts as the Houston Rockets call a timeout and the Jazz are ahead during the first quarter of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) slides on the ground after making a basket during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) reacts after an offensive foul is called on Utah Jazz forward Royce O'Neale (23) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) high-fives the crowd after scoring and getting fouled during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz fans react as the Jazz are winning in the final minutes of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Derrick Favors shoots over Houston Rockets forward Kenneth Faried (35) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) gets to the basket past Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz head coach Quin Snyder and Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) get things straight during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) holds his face after Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) elbowed him in the mouth during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Houston Rockets guard Chris Paul gets run over by Utah Jazz forward Joe Ingles (2) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) high-fives the crowd after scoring and getting fouled during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Donovan Mitchell helps Utah Jazz avoid playoff sweep with ‘pride’ on the line for Game 4 win against Houston Rockets Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) gets the ball knocked away by Houston Rockets guard Austin Rivers (25) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz fans hold up signs during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. The Utah Jazz Dancers dance before the Jazz play the Houston Rockets in Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Steve Griffin Utah Jazz fans hold up signs during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) crashes into Houston Rockets guard Eric Gordon (10) and Houston Rockets center Clint Capela (15) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz head coach Quin Snyder yells during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Steve Griffin, Deseret News Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) shoots past Houston Rockets guard Gerald Green (14) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) dribbles past Houston Rockets guard Eric Gordon (10) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) gets the ball knocked away by Houston Rockets guard Austin Rivers (25) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) slides on the ground after making a basket during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Houston Rockets center Clint Capela (15) and Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) reach for the rebound during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz head coach Quin Snyder yells during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) reacts after an offensive foul is called on Utah Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) blocks the shot of Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) gets to the basket for two during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) sits in the stands with the fans after being knocked off the court during game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Jazz fans unfurl a giant banner prior to the tip-off to the Houston Rockets versus Utah Jazz Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) screams with excitement after scoring and getting fouled during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Houston Rockets center Clint Capela (15) and Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) reach for the rebound during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) reacts after an offensive foul is called on Utah Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) shoots past Houston Rockets guard Gerald Green (14) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) sits in the stands with the fans after being knocked off the court during game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) puts his hand on Houston Rockets guard James Harden’s (13) head after blocking his shot during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) sails backwards as Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) scores the basket and was fouled during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) gets to the basket past Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. SALT LAKE CITY — Those in the local media know Jazz coach Quin Snyder doesn’t like being asked about starting lineups. So they never bothered to ask him why he started Jae Crowder in the two recent home playoff games against the Rockets. When a Houston reporter asked about the change of Crowder in place of Derrick Favors, Snyder was ready with an answer.“The same thing that made me decide to put Faves in at the end of the game,” Snyder replied. “The playoffs are a different animal. Obviously you have teams that have a certain level of continuity, but the starting lineup is something that we cherish a little too much sometimes.”Snyder’s point was that teams need to be flexible, especially when their season is on the line as it was for Utah on Monday night at Vivint Arena. The Jazz coach did some things he hadn’t done all season and they paid off in a 107-91 victory that kept his team alive, at least for a couple more days.The Jazz headed back to Houston on Tuesday afternoon to get ready for the Rockets in Game 5 Wednesday at 6 p.m. MDT at the Toyota Center.What Snyder did differently in Monday night’s win was bench two of his starters for the most or all of the final quarter and go with a couple of players who were bringing extra energy, which helped — especially on defense and on the boards.Favors played 9:59 of the final quarter, while O’Neale played the final 10:20. Joe Ingles never got off the bench in the fourth quarter and Gobert only went in for a couple of minutes.“Guys are willing to do whatever the team needs to do to help the team win,” said Snyder. “That’s what’s required in the playoffs. Jae got the start the other night and didn’t play as well as he could have. He got it again tonight and he was ready to go, Fave came off the bench and gave us some great minutes. Joe started the game and Royce came in and finished the game. That tells you right there who we are and who we need to be.”Favors ended up playing more minutes overall than Gobert for one of the few times all season and the big Frenchman was magnanimous in his postgame comments, saying he was “surprised” to be taken out and never return, but also understanding.“Of course I want to be out there,” he said. “But we all know Derrick Favors can play when he’s on the floor. He had a great game, the team is winning … that’s all that matters.”Ingles, who has struggled throughout the playoffs as the Rockets have seemed to key on him especially, was having a rough night (3 points on 1-of-4 shooting) and didn’t start the fourth quarter and never got in the final 12 minutes.The Jazz started a lineup in the fourth quarter that included Georges Niang and Thabo Sefolosha, along with Favors, Donovan Mitchell and Ricky Rubio. Mitchell led the fourth-quarter surge with 13 points in less than three minutes on a 15-1 Jazz run and ended up with 19 fourth-quarter points.O’Neale came in and played tough defense on James Harden, who only managed five points in the fourth quarter on 1-of-3 shooting. He also grabbed four rebounds and assisted on a lob to Mitchell for a spectacular throw-down dunk. Perhaps O’Neale’s most impressive number of the night was his plus-18 (Jazz were 18 points better with him on the floor), the best of any Jazz player.Favors made all three of his field-goal tries in the fourth quarter and grabbed six of his 11 rebounds, including four offensive boards.Who knows what lineups Snyder will utilize in Houston Wedesday night, but he knows that his players will be ready.“It’s not just who starts and who plays, but the way we play during the game, having that selflessness and to not worry about individual stuff,” he said. “That’s why everyone enjoys team sports because that sacrifice is something that at some point all of us can respect because we know how hard it is.” Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) shoots during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) blocks the shot of Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz fans yell during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) blocks the shot of Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Fans are greeted with Jazz T-shirts on their seats in Vivint Smart Home Arena before the start of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs between the Utah Jazz and Houston Rockets in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) dribbles past Houston Rockets guard Eric Gordon (10) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) falls onto Houston’s Chris Paul during game 4 of the NBA playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) falls onto Houston’s Chris Paul during game 4 of the NBA playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) sails backwards as Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) scores the basket and was fouled during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Fans are greeted with Jazz T-shirts on their seats in Vivint Smart Home Arena before the start of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs between the Utah Jazz and Houston Rockets in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Fans are greeted with Jazz T-shirts on their seats in Vivint Smart Home Arena before the start of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs between the Utah Jazz and Houston Rockets in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Jazz fans unfurl a giant banner prior to the tip-off to the Houston Rockets versus Utah Jazz Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) throws down a monster dunk during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) shoots in front of Houston Rockets forward Kenneth Faried (35) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) backs into Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) shoots during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) moves around Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) gets the ball stripped away by Houston Rockets guard Gerald Green (14) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Utah Jazz forward Georges Niang (31) looks to make a shot over Houston Rockets guard Gerald Green (14) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) shoots over Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) screams with excitement as he leads the Jazz to a big win during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Fans are greeted with Jazz T-shirts on their seats in Vivint Smart Home Arena before the start of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs between the Utah Jazz and Houston Rockets in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Utah Jazz head coach Quin Snyder and Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) get things straight during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) screams with excitement after scoring and getting fouled during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against Houston at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Fans are greeted with Jazz T-shirts on their seats in Vivint Smart Home Arena before the start of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs between the Utah Jazz and Houston Rockets in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) blocks the shot of Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Steve Griffin, Deseret News Fans are greeted with Jazz T-shirts on their seats in Vivint Smart Home Arena before the start of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs between the Utah Jazz and Houston Rockets in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Joe Ingles (2) shoots past Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. JAZZ NOTES: No team in NBA history has ever come back from a 3-0 deficit to win a best-of-seven series … Also, of the 132 times a team has taken a 3-0 lead, only three times has an opponent come back to tie the series at 3-3 before finally losing … Of the four times the Jazz have trailed 3-0 in a series, only once, in 2000 against Portland, have they won at least one game. However, they lost in Game 5 … If the Jazz win Wednesday night, they will return home to face the Rockets Friday night in Game 6 at Vivint Arena. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) grabs Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) as they celebrate winning Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) shoots during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Jae Crowder (99) dunks the ball after stealing it away from the Houston Rockets in Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz guard Ricky Rubio (3) reacts as the Houston Rockets call a timeout and the Jazz are ahead during the first quarter of Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz fans cheer during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs agains the Houston Rockets at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Steve Griffin, Deseret News Utah Jazz forward Georges Niang (31) looks to make a shot over Houston Rockets guard Gerald Green (14) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Utah Jazz forward Derrick Favors shoots over Houston Rockets forward Kenneth Faried (35) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Houston Rockets center Clint Capela (15) leaps into the air as he saves the ball during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Utah Jazz at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) puts his hand on Houston Rockets guard James Harden’s (13) head after blocking his shot during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Joe Ingles (2) shoots past Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Houston Rockets forward Kenneth Faried (35) looks up during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs against the Utah Jazz at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Houston Rockets guard Chris Paul gets run over by Utah Jazz forward Joe Ingles (2) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) shoots as Houston Rockets guard Gerald Green (14) guards him during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. The Jazz won 107-91. Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (17) backs into Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) during Game 4 of the NBA Playoffs at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Monday, April 22, 2019. Kristin Murphy, Deseret News Brad Rock: Utah Jazz make their house a home, just in timelast_img read more

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first_imgFrom Aditi KhannaLondon, Jan 26 (PTI) The rising popularity of Tata Motors-owned Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) models led to an impressive 15.8 per cent increase in the UKs car exports to India in 2016, according to the latest UK automotive industry figures released here today.India is now the eighth largest Asian market for UK car exports with JLRs Land Rover Discovery Sport, Ranger Rover Evoque, Jaguar XF, Jaguar XE and Jaguar F-Pace among the top five most popular models.The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders (SMMT), one of the UKs largest trade associations, said the Indian demand formed part of a wider 17-year high for British car manufacturing last year.”India is now the eighth biggest Asian market for UK car exports, with demand rising at a rapid rate as an increasing number of affluent buyers take advantage of a range of all new premium and luxury British-built cars. UK car exports to the country grew 15.8 per cent to 3,372 in 2016,” SMMT said in a statement.It also found that Indian-built car models accounted for 31,535 new car registrations in the UK, an uplift of more than 12.6 per cent on 2015.”India and the UK have a great history of collaboration in the automotive sector and it is essential we secure mutually beneficial trade relationships in the future. India is a growing market, for the moment largely for luxury vehicles. But we face high import tariffs which makes it more difficult to sell into India,” said Mike Hawes, SMMT chief executive.”It remains to be seen the kind of trade deal the UK may look to agree with India post-Brexit. But meanwhile, it is very much about producing the right product for the market, which is in the premium category,” he noted.advertisementMeanwhile, as many as 1,727,471 vehicles rolled off production lines in the UK last year from some 15 manufacturers, an 8.8 per cent rise in total car production in Britain compared to 2015 and the highest output since 1999.More cars are now being exported from Britain than ever before, which the SMMT highlighted was the result of investment made over recent years in world-class production facilities, cutting-edge design and technology and one of Europes most highly skilled and productive workforces rather than any Brexit effect.Production growth in the UK was predominantly driven by overseas demand, with global appetite for British-built cars rising by 10.3 per cent to an all-time high of 1,354,216 ? a second consecutive annual record.The European Union (EU) remains by far the countrys biggest market, something that could be directly affected by the final trade deal struck as Britain exits the economic bloc.”Brexit is a significant challenge and we want our respective governments to support our industry. The last year was undoubtedly a very, very successful year for the industry but there is a lot of uncertainty with one of our biggest market, the EU,” added Hawes. PTI AK AMS SUA NSAlast_img read more

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first_imgMy favorite pink paper, the Financial Times, had an editorial this weekend by v3’s Robert Egger. Check it out if you missed it.The gist (and I quote):In you were savvy enough to have invested $1,000 in Microsoft when it went public in 1986, the value of your stock today would be close to $½m. But what if you had invested the same amount in a high-performing non-profit group; one that could show measurable, financial impact in your community? All you would have been eligible for is a one-off tax deduction.Think boldly for a moment. Imagine if there was a way to measure and then reward strategic investments in non-profits in the form of an annual and potentially growing tax deduction based on the same rate of return principle as the dividend. Imagine how that would revolutionise the productivity of non-profits, as well as create an incentive for individuals to seek out and support some of the most dynamic social and economic stimulators in their communities. More importantly, since Americans donated $295bn to non-profits in 2006, while businesses spent $1.2bn on cause-related marketing to trumpet their philanthropy, a shift like this might also lead to coverage of the sector with the same level of critical analysis that is afforded traditional businesses.Imagine how this might challenge the entire notion of “charity” in the US and usher in a bold new era of social and economic innovation.What I like about this kind of idea is it fundamentally shifts the way we think about ourselves. Are we charities seeking handouts or are we the best damn investment anyone could make in their community? Try to put on this kind of mental strut (work it!) next time you compose an “ask” of any kind. Your results are worth bragging about, and they are worth a reward for your donors investors.Don’t beg. Strut your ROI till the policymakers listen.last_img read more

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first_imgBad Habit No. 6: Being allergic to changeDiscipline is an important part of success, but it’s not everything. We’re standing at the edge of a new era for nonprofits. Our old donors are inexorably passing away. Their demographic niche is being filled by a strange, new tribe: the boomers. Their motivations for giving are different from their elders’. The way we talk to them has to be different — and we’re only beginning to understand the difference.At the same time, a powerful, new communications medium — the Internet — is crowding in on the print, broadcast and direct-response media. The techniques and tactics of the Internet are different in some surprising ways.The electric combination of a new type of donor and its new preferred medium puts us in a scary position: Change or die. Some are going to die.Yes, change is risky. New ventures fail more often than they succeed. But change is our only viable long-term strategy. Embrace change, and you have a long and hopeful future ahead of you.The good news about all these bad habits: They are merely mental — less constraining than cobwebs. They can be changed in the twinkling of an eye. The bad news: Mental chains can be the hardest to break.Source: This article originally appeared in the April 2008 edition of FundRaising Success magazine, www.fundraisingsuccessmag.com. Bad Habit No. 2: Talking to yourself, not your donorsThis is a tough habit to break because it requires you to think outside yourself. Truth is … your thoughts, your experience, your education, your relationship with the cause, and (most likely) your demographic and psychographic profiles are very different from your donors’. The moment you do (or don’t do) something in fundraising because it would appeal (or not appeal) to you, you are on shaky ground.Don’t create messages that would motivate you. Seek to understand your donors, and create messages for them. In fact, if something feels slam-dunk persuasive to you, take that as a warning sign that you’re missing your donors. Bad Habit No. 1: Being ashamed of fundraisingIt’s odd, but many professional fundraisers have an insidious belief that asking people for money is annoying, embarrassing or disrespectful.This puts them in confusing territory, where they need their donors to fund vital programs — but they don’t want to admit it. That bends their fundraising messages into pretzel shapes that look something like this: “Maybe you’d be interested in giving. It’s OK if you don’t give. We’re a very well-run organization, and we have many other sources of funding. You’re a small fish anyway, to be honest. But, you know, if you think of it, a gift would be a nice gesture.”That’s an exaggeration, but it’s not far from how shame-based fundraising operates. Besides its basic dishonesty, this type of fundraising fails to respect the reality of donors and their gifts.Donors want to be wanted. They need to be needed. They intend to make the world a better place. Coming to the rescue makes them happy. So if you need your donors, go ahead and tell them. Let them know the urgency and the stakes. Be direct. Don’t hide your need behind a mousy veil of pseudo-politeness.If you’re burdened with an attitude that asking for money somehow gets in the way of a real relationship with donors, you’re missing an important fact: For nearly all donors, giving is the medium through which they relate to you and your cause. Their gifts are the way they translate their values into action.Philosophical musings or high-level theory about the cause is beside the point for most donors. Giving is the main event. Asking is a great service. Be proud of it. Bad Habit No. 5: Being addicted to changeI know it’s boring to hear this, but a huge part of success in fundraising involves plodding along with proven programs, making changes in incremental and disciplined ways. It means saying the same thing over and over, even though you’re getting out-of-your-mind tired of it.Many a nonprofit has set aside lifeblood fundraising programs because it got tired of them — and suffered crippling revenue losses as a result. Don’t let that happen to you. Stay disciplined! When fundraisers are ineffective, it’s almost always because they are the victims of their own mental habits. These bad habits are more harmful than lack of resources, bad economic times or even stupidity. Conquer these habits, and you’ll raise a lot more money. Bad Habit No. 4: Basing decisions on fearBad things happen. And when they do, we often kick ourselves for failing to anticipate them. That’s why many people and organizations put prodigious energy into anticipating problems.Trouble is, you seldom anticipate the actual problems that happen. Instead, you build walls that are better at keeping innovation out than keeping you safe. Decisions made in fear do far more harm than the things you’re afraid of. Cast out your fear! Bad Habit No. 3: Making decisions on instinct, not factsInstinct can do you a lot of good in life, like warning you not to walk down the wrong street in a neighborhood you don’t know. But sometimes instinct is flat-out wrong. Here are some common instinctive beliefs that may feel true:Don’t ask someone who recently gave. Donors need to “rest” between gifts.Don’t call the donors; everybody hates telemarketing.Nobody reads long letters anymore.I can almost guarantee you that all three of these statements are completely wrong. Your results, as they say, may vary. But overwhelmingly, the facts will show these instincts to be false.When your instinct tells you something, use that as a starting point. Call it a hypothesis (that’s all it is) until you can verify the facts. You could end up shocked at how wrong your instincts were. That happens all the time. But armed with the facts, you’ll make much better decisions in the future.last_img read more

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first_imgSending email to people who didn’t ask for it.While it’s important to make sure your email looks great, a successful campaign really starts with a solid, permission-based list. Only email people who have asked to receive your updates or are directly affiliated with your organization. If it’s a rented list, a purchased list or a list of people who’ve never heard of you, avoid it. Forgetting to test. By taking a few minutes to send a test to yourself and a few colleagues, you can have peace of mind that your links work, your copy is typo-free and everything looks just the way you thought it would – all before you hit send to the big list. Neglecting to personalize. Sometimes being one in a million isn’t such a good thing, and you certainly don’t want your readers to feel like they’re just one email address in a one giant list. Use your email campaign to connect personally with your readers, but don’t just stop with a personal first name greeting (although that’s a great place to start). Look for other ways to extend a personal touch, whether it’s through sending targeted messages based on your readers’ zip codes or interests or keeping a friendly, personal tone as you write your content.Remember, these things to avoid don’t qualify as hard and fast rules. Rules are things like waiting thirty minutes after lunch to swim or not going outside with wet hair. You know, important stuff. We’re just offering a few suggestions to help you on your way to email marketing greatness. After all, we think the best idea is the one that suits you and your audience. Using an invalid reply-to address. Since permission-based email marketing is all about staying in touch with your members and customers, giving your recipients a way to continue the conversation is a must. Otherwise, you’ll miss the follow-up questions from your subscribers, not to mention those rare (but important!) unsubscribe requests from people who choose to reply to you instead of using a built-in opt-out link.If the From Address you’re currently using doesn’t exist, consider asking your email administrator to create it, or change it to an address that does exist and is monitored by someone who can manage the replies. Writing – and sending – a novel. By novel, of course, we mean a really flipping long email. When you send a campaign that goes on and on (and on), a typical subscriber – with a typically short attention span – probably won’t sift through lots of text to find the content that interests them. Instead, your recipients may delete your email at a glance.Consider teasing your news articles with a quick text blurb in your email newsletter, then use landing pages to link your subscribers to additional content hosted on your website. In addition to shortening the length of your campaign, you also get the benefit of seeing which articles people click through to read – and you’ll end up learning more about what your readers are interested in. Ignoring those results. After all the work of the big send-off, don’t forget the fun of watching the results roll in. They’ll tell you a lot about what your audience is interested in. Have an overwhelming click-through response last month when you linked to your blog? Consider adding more links like that in this issue. Did 62 people click to learn more about your newest program? Sounds like follow-up phone calls might be in order. Make sure you learn from the way people respond, and apply those lessons toward even greater success next time. Sending too often (or not enough). Finding your ideal frequency depends on a few factors, like what your organization does and who you send to. Just keep in mind that sending too frequently may annoy your readers and increase your opt-out rate, but long lapses of silence may cause some readers to just plain forget about you. Aim for regular contact that keeps your brand in front of your readers, and make sure each send-off has a purpose. And in general, we recommend staying in front of your audience at least once a month but not more than a couple times a week.center_img Sending one big image. We know it’s tempting to take that gorgeous flier your designer created for print, save it as a jpg and plug it into your email campaign. But sending one big image is risky. Servers are more likely to filter emails with large images, and recipients may move on to other things before your image fully loads. And some email programs, like Gmail and Outlook, block images by default, meaning that a percentage of your recipients might see the original email you designed as a big, broken image. Yikes.One option to repurpose a print piece in email would be to ask an HTML designer to take the single large image and recode it into smaller, sliced images. Here are a few email no-nos to keep in mind next time you create an email campaign. Email can be a powerful tool for staying in touch with supporters. After spending time on your email strategy and crafting the perfect message, don’t crash and burn by making one of these common mistakes. Getting freaky with Comic Sans. Fonts and colors and formatting, oh my. Keep your campaigns easy on the eyes with simple, intentional style choices. Avoid switching fonts every few lines, and choose your colors with an eye for readability. After all, a well-formatted campaign will catch your readers’ attention and make it easy to keep reading. And isn’t that the whole idea? Using a generic subject line. You know that your latest email campaign is the October Newsletter. And you know that it’s great. But it’s up to you to tell your customers just why October is so darn special. Consider using your subject line to tease your favorite article or whatever *you* decide is the most enticing part of your newsletter.Also, try including your brand in the subject line. It’ll let people instantly recognize *your* email at a glance and can help with inbox sorting down the road. Here are a few examples to get you started…Average: October NewsletterMuch better: Paws for the Cause News: New Litter of Daschunds!Average: Upcoming events this monthMuch better: Can’t-miss events at Main Street Theatre: A VIP-only concert and much more…last_img read more

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first_imgWhatever your political persuasion, do it if you haven’t already!And check out some of the fascinating coverage here:fivethirtyeightpollsterpolitcohuffpolast_img

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