first_img FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 By News Highland – January 27, 2021 Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter WhatsApp Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction AudioHomepage BannerNews Google+ WhatsApp Facebook Previous articleMid-ranking Gardaí concerned over new travel lawsNext articleBusiness Matters Ep 28 – Denis Sheridan News Highland center_img DL Debate – 24/05/21 Google+ Facebook Leaving Certs ‘need to know the score within the week’ Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Harps come back to win in Waterford Pinterest A former Education Minister says it’s imperative that a call is made on the Leaving Cert within the week.The Government is remaining hopeful that the exams can go ahead this year.Second-level teachers’ union and student representatives are due to resume talks on alternative options to the Leaving Cert today.Donegal Deputy Joe McHugh says it’s positive that those talks are on-going but stressed that student’s need urgent clarity:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/joemchugh1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24thlast_img read more

Posted in uzpxiwnm

first_imgGlas za Zadar tijekom 20 dana izbora za destinaciju godine, na uglednom belgijskom portalu “European Best Destinations” kojega prati oko 2,5 milijuna ljudi, došao je gotovo sa svih svjetskih kontinenata, a jedan glas podrške hrvatskom i mediteranskom biseru stigao je čak s Bahama. Glasalo je nikad više ljudi: ukupno 288,992 ili 17,9 posto više nego 2015., dok je Zadar kao pobjednik izbora dobio također rekordnih 57,616 glasova, od čega je 53,4 posto glasova stiglo izvan Hrvatske. Veseli činjenica kako je pola glasova stiglo izvan Hrvatske, nadam se kako će ti glasovi u sljedećoj turističkoj sezoni doći u Zadar i tako postati dio priče kojoj su dali glas.When we talk about free promotion only during the election campaign in 20 days, Zadar was directly or indirectly mentioned in more than 780 newspaper articles and more than 6400 comments with 118,487 shares or so-called shares on Facebook pages, and the massive mobilization included 96,875 new likes.Last year’s winner Bordeaux had a 16 per cent growth in tourismKakve turističke rezultate izbor EBD portala može donijeti pobjedniku, u ovogodišnjem slučaju Zadru? – pitanje je na koje ćemo odgovor dobiti početkom sljedeće godine, kada se turistički promet i ukupno poimanje turizma u Zadru stavi pod povećalo. Kako se to laskavo priznanje i vrhunska turistička preporuka može pretočiti u uspjeh pokazao je primjer Bordeauxa, prošlogodišnjeg pobjednika izbora za najbolju europsku destinaciju. Ukupni turistički promet u Bordeauxu povećao se za gotovo 16 place, dok je broj međunarodnih dolazaka zabilježenih na aerodromu “Bordeaux Merignac Airport” porastao za 10,7 place. Prvi čovjek turizma u Bordeauxu Nicolas Martin pohvalio se još jednom činjenicom proizašlom iz prošlogodišnje pobjede Bordeauxa u izboru za najbolju europsku destinaciju portala “European Best Destinations” „ Revenues per room in all categories of hotels in Bordeaux increased by as much as 12,26 percent, with significantly higher arrivals of guests from Britain, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, Belgium and Italy.”Nicolas Martin points out.Zahvaljujući društvenim mrežama i kampanji #BirajZadar koju je volonterski vodila skupina mladih entuzijasta u suradnji s TZ Zadra, Zadar su podržale, među ostalima, i velike svjetske sportske zvijezde Luka Modrić i Colllin Jackson te svjetski top model Helena Šopar, a svoj glas Zadru dao je i velika japanska televizijska zvijezda, masterchef  Toshihiro Nakatsuji.The Zadar Tourist Board took great advantage of the opportunity, regardless of the final result, and created a positive buzz through social media. For this purpose, special promotional visuals, videos, websites were created and the reach of the entire campaign was impressive – a total of 780 journalistic articles that generated free PR and when we add up the reach via social networks, we can certainly say that a great job was done.The story is just beginningBut this story is not the end, in fact, it is just the beginning. On the example of Bordeaux, we saw the potential in increasing tourist traffic, and for Tz Zadar the work is just beginning. It is necessary to justify this flattering title of the best European tourist destination, but also to generate growth in both tourist arrivals and tourist traffic.”The city and the Tourist Board will continue to invest even more in public areas and infrastructure, in programs and further presentation and branding of Zadar. In a word, more and more people will invest in tourism at all levels, so its quality will be better and better.”Said Dražen Grgurović, Deputy President of the Tourist Board of the City Tourist BoardWe hope that Zadar is aware of the potential and opportunities and that only now they need to increase investment in tourism at all levels. The conclusion is clear: Zadar has made good use of the opportunity offered to it, but the real work is only just beginning.last_img read more

Posted in taxswawl

first_imgArticle published by malavikavyawahare Madagascar’s president, Andry Rajoelina, is considering sponsoring a petition launched by the Association of Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) that outlines conservation priorities for the country.Almost 90 percent of Madagascar’s flora and fauna is endemic to the island nation, but is severely threatened by forest loss and trafficking.If the petition garners a sufficient number of signatures by August 2 it will be instated as the ‘Declaration of Ivato.’ If a sufficient number of signatories back a petition outlining conservation priorities for Madagascar it will be sponsored by the Malagasy president, Andry Rajoelina, and be instated as the  ‘Declaration of Ivato’ this Saturday.As of Tuesday about 3,800 people had signed on to the petition launched by the Association of Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC). Participants from over 50 countries have gathered in the capital Antananarivo to attend the ATBC’s 56th annual meeting, which runs from July 31 to August 3 at the Ivato International Convention Centre.The petition draws on a comment piece published in Nature Sustainability in May that recommends actions for the Malagasy government and key stakeholders to protect the country’s astounding floral and faunal diversity. An estimated 90 percent of the country’s species are endemic because of its isolation for millions of years. The country hosts over 100 lemur species, most of which are threatened, and lesser-known but equally enigmatic reptile and amphibian species.Many of these are threatened because of unchecked forest loss, habitat degradation, fragmentation and wildlife trafficking. In 2018, Madagascar lost 2 percent of its primary rainforests, the highest proportion for any country. About half of the forests that remain are now less than 100 meters from a forest boundary.Andry Rajoelina came to power in January this year. Image by Malavika Vyawahare.The installation of a new government under Rajoelina this year raised hopes that the political stability could be leveraged to stem environmental destruction. During the leader’s previous term (2009-14) when he came to power on the back of a coup d’état, the country continued on its path of unbridled natural resource exploitation.Madagascar is one of the poorest countries in Africa and reports high rates of child malnutrition, making conservation particularly challenging. The president has emphasized sustainable development but the path to achieving it remains unclear. Conservation must “contribute to, not detract from, efforts of the country to develop economically,” the petition  notes.The petition provides recommendations to guide government policy. Five actions identified as most urgent by the petitioners are: tackling environmental crime, investing in Madagascar’s protected areas, ensuring major infrastructure developments limit impacts on biodiversity, strengthening tenure rights for local people over natural resources and addressing Madagascar’s growing fuel wood crisis.Banner image: A critically endangered indri (Indri indri), the largest of the lemur species near Andasibe, Madagascar. Image by Rhett A. Butler. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Governance, Protected Areas last_img read more

Posted in kunijngs

first_imgExamples of two wildlife movement theories: (above) The stepping stone theory predicts that patches of disconnected habitats best facilitate the movement of species within a network of protected areas. Image by José Luiz Viana do Couto, Rede Agronomia. (below) The corridor theory suggests that habitat “bridges” that are structurally intact best facilitate species movement between protected areas. Image by Laury Cullen Jr,  CC BY-SA 4.0. Research has shown that individual animals across more than 50 species move shorter distances in fragmented habitats; such changes in movement behavior may negatively affect an animal’s survival and reproduction.Some animals have large home ranges and others migrate seasonally, so a small, isolated PA might be unable to support enough individuals to form a sustainable population on its own.So, is simply creating more protected areas the solution to halting the extinction crisis? Certainly not, according to Frances Stewart, a wildlife ecologist at the University of Victoria who led the study. “The quality of protected areas and the landscape between them is an important feature, not just the quantity of protected areas,” she told Mongabay. “As we develop more protected areas, we must consider how animals will piece them together.”“The importance of connectivity between protected areas is acknowledged globally, and considered in protected area planning,” Stewart said. The question remains, how do animals actually move across fragmented landscapes and what vegetative configuration can best facilitate their movements in between PAs?Stewart and her colleagues set out to answer this question by testing three common theories of functional connectivity, defined as “the degree to which the landscape facilitates or impedes movement among resource patches,” by tracking the movements of fishers across a network of several hundred PAs.The first is the corridor theory, which can be visualized as a habitat “bridge”. In this scenario, animals move across long thin strips of forested land (or whatever the native vegetation is) that remain between two designated protected areas. The second is the least-cost paths theory, which predicts that animals will move across the PA network and surrounding unprotected matrix based on the physical “cost,” in terms of resource density, of making those movements. The third is the stepping-stone theory, which suggests that animals will migrate or disperse among larger protected areas by stopping in smaller, disconnected forest patches in between them. Article published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored For protected area (PA) networks to be an effective conservation tool, they should be well-connected to allow species movement through unprotected landscapes, but questions remain on what configuration of natural features can best facilitate animal movement.A recent study compared three theories of animal movement (structurally intact corridors, least-cost paths, and stepping stones) by analyzing the fine-scale movements of GPS-tagged fishers, a member of the weasel family. They found the tagged fishers consistently moved along structurally intact, natural corridors across a PA network.With the Aichi 2020 Biodiversity Targets in mind, the authors highlight that simply increasing the number of protected areas alone may not achieve the objectives of the protected area network amidst an increasingly fragmented landscape; the conservation of natural corridors between PAs may be equally important, something for future planners to consider. In a recently published  study, Canadian researchers monitored the fine-scale movements of GPS-tagged fishers (Pekania pennanti), a member of the weasel family, across a terrain of over 700 protected areas (PAs) in Alberta, Canada. They found that corridors of natural structurally intact habitat may be just as critical as the protected areas themselves for conserving forest-dwelling mammals.Connectivity over quantityIn the face of climate change and loss of natural vegetation, increasing public awareness over the accelerated rate of global species extinction has compelled governments in more than 240 countries to dramatically increase the number of protected areas over the last 20 years. According to a report by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), there are over 200,000 terrestrial protected areas around the world being governed on a national level as of 2016. But a majority of those PAs exist in increasingly patchy, fragmented networks within an ever-expanding human-dominated landscape.This is bad news for the animals these reserves are meant to protect.center_img Characteristics describing the three common theories of landscape connectivity across a protected area network analyzed in this study. The black dotted pathways in each map show hypothetical movements of fishers within each model. Image is adapted from Figure 3 from Stewart et al (2019),  CC  2.0.Follow the fisher to find outThe fisher is a small carnivorous mammal in the mustelid (weasel) family native to North America.“We chose to study fishers for this research because they are a species in the middle of the mammal food chain – they are eaten by larger species, but also eat many smaller species,” Stewart said. “This means that their movements and use of their surroundings is generally indicative of other mammals within the ecosystem and allows us to generally say what mammals need.”The fisher (Pekania pennanti) is a forest-dwelling member of the weasel family with thick brown fur, generally the size of a domestic cat. In the 1800s, fishers nearly went extinct due to logging and over-trapping. Their numbers have steadily increased since then, but the exact status of their population is still unknown. Image by Christopher Lee, courtesy of Frances Stewart.The research team carried out the study in the Beaver Hills Biosphere in east-central Alberta, Canada. The area spans 1,596 square kilometers (616 square miles) and is an excellent example of a protected area matrix; 763 protected areas of varying sizes occur within the biosphere alongside areas of human development and unprotected but still naturally vegetated areas.To better understand how animals piece together their landscape, the research team captured 10 fishers, representing about 17 percent of the estimated population of 58 adult individuals, and fitted them with Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking collars. Once they released the animals back into the wild, the GPS units collected their point locations over an average of 33 days, at continuous five-minute intervals if the animal was moving faster than 10 centimeters (3.9 inches) per second.To test their three hypotheses, the researchers measured the fine-scale movements of the tagged fishers. These included the speed and tortuosity of the discrete five-minute steps. The team measured speed as the linear distances between successive GPS points (the number of meters moved every 5 minutes) and tortuosity as the turn angles between successive GPS points. They used these two variables to infer “residency” time at any one spot. For example, movements with many turns and short step lengths indicate longer time spent within an area. Conversely, long linear steps indicate forward movement and shorter residency time.The research team fitted 10 fishers with GPS tracking collars to better understand how these animals move around varied landscapes. Image courtesy of Frances Stewart.Using a digital map of Beaver Hills Biosphere and the mapping tool ArcGIS, the team quantified fisher movement across 15 landscape features, broadly categorized as anthropogenic, natural habitat, or protected area.The researchers predicted that if the stepping-stone theory best explained fishers’ use of space, the animals’ movements should indicate longer residence time (i.e. short, non-linear distances between GPS points) within protected areas. If the corridor theory was correct, fishers should move along natural forested areas. And if the least-cost paths theory best described fisher movement patterns, the fisher movements should comprise shorter steps, indicating longer residence time, in areas with high movement cost, and long, linear movements (a sign of traveling) across landscapes with low movement costs.The research team’s analysis of the tracking data across Beaver Hills Biosphere showed that “fishers predominantly used natural features as corridors, rather than crossing multiple landscape features with different movement costs or using stepping stones within or between protected habitat patches.”In other words, the study indicated that the corridor theory best explained fisher movement across this PA network. “The presence of multiple protected areas alone may not facilitate landscape connectivity unless structurally connected by natural, polygonal, landscape features,” the authors point out.Fishers are small, solitary, elusive, and primarily carnivorous. They are known to hunt and eat rabbits, snowshoe hares, squirrels, raccoons, mice, reptiles, amphibians, house cats, and are one of the few specialized feeders of porcupine. They will also eat berries and fruit when prey is not available. They are native to North America, and their range cover much of the boreal forest in Canada and the northern United States. Image by Michel Rathwell, Flickr, CC BY 2.0.Future implications“What we show here is that corridors – as a specific type of connectivity –are very important for the fisher, and probably also other mammal species,” Stewart said.She added that she hoped that the study’s findings can better inform protected area planning in the future.“Corridors themselves are rarely explicitly incorporated into landscape, and importantly, protected area planning partly because controlling what happens on the land between protected areas is difficult for planners,” Stewart said. “We hope this work helps planners and landowners understand the importance of how the actions taken on their land affects the bigger picture of protecting landscapes for biodiversity conservation generally.”In 2010, the United Nations’ Convention on Biological Diversity brought together 194 nations to Nagoya, Japan, where representatives set 20 Biodiversity Targets with the goal of meeting them by 2020. Specifically, Target 11 calls for the protection of at least 17 percent of land and 10 percent of marine areas. The results of this study suggest that “focusing on maintaining or restoring natural landscape features within the matrix of existing PA networks,” or establishing PA networks within regions that already contain an abundance of natural habitats, “will greatly aid conservation objectives.”“We show that increasing the extent of the global protected area network is not a stand-alone solution to connecting protected areas,” the researchers say in their paper. “The conservation of natural landscape features between protected areas is the mortar that binds them together.”CitationStewart, F. E., Darlington, S., Volpe, J. P., McAdie, M., & Fisher, J. T. (2019). Corridors best facilitate functional connectivity across a protected area network. Scientific reports, 9(1), 10852.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. animal tracking, Conservation, Corridors, Forests, GPS, GPS tracking, Interns, Mammals, Mapping, Monitoring, Protected Areas, Research, Technology, Temperate Forests, Tracking, Wildlife Corridors, Wildtech last_img read more

Posted in kiyxelbq

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A mostly nocturnal species found in freshwater habitats in Mexico and South America, the electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) belongs to the knifefish family and is more closely related to catfish and carp than other eels. It was first described more than 250 years ago by Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus.But now a team of scientists led by Carlos David de Santana, an associate researcher at the US Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, has determined that E. electricus is in fact three distinct species.During their work in the field, the researchers used a voltmeter to record a member of one of the newly described species, E. voltai, discharging 860 volts, the highest discharge ever recorded for any animal (the previous record was 650 volts). There are now three recognized species of electric eel after two new species were described to science in a paper published in Nature Communications this week.One of the new eel species is capable of generating a shock of as much as 860 volts, the most powerful electrical discharge ever discovered in any known animal.A mostly nocturnal species found in freshwater habitats in Mexico and South America, the electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) belongs to the knifefish family and is more closely related to catfish and carp than other eels. It was first described more than 250 years ago by Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus. But now a team of scientists led by Carlos David de Santana, an associate researcher at the US Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, has determined that E. electricus is in fact three distinct species.De Santana and team collected 107 electric eel specimens from different parts of the Amazon in Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana, and Suriname. They then analyzed the specimens’ mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, morphology, ecological data, and voltage discharge to conclude that the eels actually represented three different species.David Santana looking for electric fish in the National Forest, Amapá. Photo Credit: E. Kuano.“Their body shape is highly conserved. It has not changed much during 10 million years of evolution,” Santana said in a statement. “Only a few details of their external morphology distinguish them, and only an integrated analysis of morphology, genetics and ecology was able to make robust distinctions between the species.”During their work in the field, the researchers used a voltmeter to record a member of one of the newly described species, E. voltai, discharging 860 volts, the highest discharge ever recorded (the previous record was 650 volts). Differences in electrical discharge was a key factor in determining that there were two heretofore unrecognized species of electric eel. “We used voltage as the key differentiation criterion,” said Naércio Menezes, a professor at Brazil’s University of São Paulo and principal investigator of the Thematic Project, of which the present study was a part. “This has never been done before to identify a new species.”E. electricus is now considered to be the species of electric eel that lives in an area of the northern Amazon known as the Guiana Shield, which encompasses the northern parts of the Brazilian states of Amapá, Amazonas, and Roraima as well as Guyana, French Guiana, and Suriname.E. voltai, named after Italian physicist and inventor of the electric battery Alessandro Volta, can be found in the Brazilian Shield, which stretches across parts of the Brazilian states of Pará, Amazonas, Rondônia, and Mato Grosso. Smaller amounts of dissolved salts make the region’s water less electrically conductive, leading the researchers to theorize that E. voltai responded by developing the ability to produce stronger electrical discharges in order to stun prey and ward off predators.E. voltai in the Xingu river. An article published in Nature Communications shows that three species of electric eel exist, not just one as previously described, and that one of them produces an electric shock up to 860 volts. The researchers were funded by FAPESP, the Smithsonian and National Geographic. Photo Credit: L. Souza.The other newly described species, E. varii, was named for zoologist Richard P. Vari, a researcher at the Smithsonian who passed away in 2016. “He was the foreign researcher who most influenced and helped Brazilian students and researchers with the study of fish in South America,” Santana said.E. varii can be found in the lowland Amazon Basin, where it inhabits turbid rivers with a relatively large amount of dissolved salts. Since this increases the conductivity of the water, the discharges of E. varii don’t need to be as powerful, and indeed they range from just 151 to 572 volts.Until 2016, reports of electric eels leaping out of the water to shock would-be predators were considered apocryphal. But Kenneth Catania, a scientist at Vanderbilt University in the US, proved that they do in fact leap out of the water in order to press their chins directly against a target and deliver what he calls their “high-voltage volleys.” You can even watch video of an electric eel attack that Catania made during his study.Santana and team believe that the species diverged twice: first in the Miocene, approximately 7.1 million years ago, when they separated from their common ancestor; and again in the Pliocene, about 3.6 million years ago, when the species we now know as E. voltai and E. electricus emerged.“The discovery of new electric eel species in Amazonia, one of the planet’s biodiversity hotspots, is suggestive of the vast amount of species that remain to be discovered in nature,” Santana said. “Furthermore, the region is of great interest to other scientific fields, such as medicine and biotechnology, reinforcing the need to protect and conserve it, and is important for studies involving partnerships among Brazilian researchers, and between us and groups in other countries, to explore the region’s biodiversity.”An electric eel. Photo by Sharon Mollerus, licensed under CC BY 2.0.CITATION• Santana et al. (2019). Unexpected species diversity in electric eels with a description of the strongest living bioelectricity generator. Nature Communications. doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11690-zFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Amazon, Amazon Biodiversity, Animals, Environment, Fish, Freshwater Fish, New Species, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife last_img read more

Posted in ucaajwge

first_imgThe Philippines has 11 endemic hornbill species and nine are threatened, according to the country’s red list of threatened species, which was updated this year.The Visayan hornbill is the latest species to be identified as critically endangered, joining the rufous-headed hornbill and the Sulu hornbill.While conservation programs have strengthened the protection of the rufous-headed hornbill, the population of the Sulu hornbill continues to decline, with only 27 recorded individuals in the wild.The Philippines is working on a national hornbill conservation action plan, which will place all hornbill species under a stricter mantle of protection. MANILA — The last 15 years have been harsh on hornbills in the Philippines: Nine out of the 11 species in the country are threatened, with the Visayan hornbill (Penelopides panini) reaching critically endangered status, according to the environment department’s updated National List of Threatened Terrestrial Fauna of the Philippines.“From seven hornbill species threatened in 2004, we now have nine,” Berhel Doria of the environment department’s wildlife resources division tells Mongabay. “Unlike other birds that make nests out of dried plants, hornbills make nests from hollow trees,” he says, which makes them vulnerable to illegal logging, in addition to poaching and hunting.Of the 55 recognized hornbill species in the world, 32 are found in Asia, and 11 are endemic to the Philippines.The Visayan hornbill is particularly threatened, with an estimated wild population of 1,200, according to figures from the IUCN and U.K.-based BirdLife International.Endemic to the Visayas group of islands that make up the central portion of the Philippine archipelago, the hornbill was also the first to report a subspecies extinction in 2013, when the Ticao hornbill (P. p. ticaensis) disappeared completely from Ticao Island.“Our list of threatened bird species grew,” Doria says. “As a matter of fact, birds are the biggest addition to the threatened list. None of our avian species got delisted.”A male rufous-headed hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus waldeni) in Sebaste, Panay Island in the Philippines. Rufous-headed hornbills are critically endangered in the country but province-wide conservation efforts saw lower mortality rates among juveniles in Panay. Image by David Quimpo / Haribon FoundationDeclining population in the wildThe updated red list identifies two other hornbill species as being critically endangered hornbill: the rufous-headed hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus waldeni), which is endemic to the islands of Panay and Negros in the Visayas, and the Sulu hornbill (Anthracoceros montani), found only on the island of Tawi-Tawi in Mindanao.The Haribon Foundation, a local group that’s carrying out a massive reforestation project in Panay, estimates the  rufous-headed hornbill population at 1,800 on the island. Gregorio dela Rosa Jr. of the Haribon Foundation says the group plans to open another office on neighboring Negros Island, where the same species is deemed “functionally extinct.”“The islands of Panay was once a hotspot for deforestation in the ’60s to ’70s,” dela Rosa says. “But the province’s awareness on conserving the hornbills are high – the locals even have a festival where they dress up as hornbills.”Prospects are bleaker, however, for the Sulu hornbill. With only 27 recorded individuals in the wild, according to BirdLife International, a sharp decline from the 49 estimated by the IUCN in 2017, the species’ existence heavily hinges on the security situation in Mindanao, where armed insurgents are known to target birdwatchers and avian researchers.In a survey Haribon conducted this year in Tawi-Tawi, the species remained elusive. “We didn’t see any individual when we did our survey … and we stayed there for one month,” dela Rosa says.A pair of Sulu hornbills, the rarest hornbill in the world, can only be found in the island of Tawi-Tawi in Mindanao. The bird’s population is down to 27 individuals, according to Birdlife International. Image by Nicky IcarangalNational hornbill conservation planTwo other hornbill species also saw their conservation outlook decline on the national red list. The Luzon rufous hornbill (Buceros hydrocorax), notorious for preying on the chicks of the Philippine eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi), and the Mindanao wrinkled hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus leucocephalus) were both classified as vulnerable in 2004 but are now considered endangered. The Mindoro hornbill (Penelopides mindorensis) is the third endangered hornbill species in the country.Three species listed as vulnerable are the Luzon hornbill (Penelopides manillae), the Mindanao hornbill (Penelopides affinis) and the Palawan hornbill (Anthracoceros marchei).The Samar hornbill (Penelopides samarensis) and the Southern rufous hornbill (Buceros mindanensis) remain in the least concern category, though the IUCN classifies the latter as vulnerable. Regardless, all 11 species will be covered by the Philippines’ national hornbill conservation action plan, which Doria says is already in the pipeline.Hornbills are called “farmers of the forests” by experts Margaret Kinnaird and Tim O’Brien for their role in dispersing seeds. They’re famed for being among the noisiest birds in the forests, and are capable of flying across great distances to find fruit-bearing trees.Forest conversion to agricultural and logging practices remain the biggest threat to hornbills, which thrive on primary or well-developed secondary forests. “Hunting, trapping and nest poaching for food, the illegal pet trade and sport are also responsible for the decline in Philippine hornbills,” says the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines, a nonprofit.The Philippine Red List committee (PRLC) assessed almost 2,000 species of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates to update the country’s red list. The environment department has yet to publish and release the official list.Banner image of the Visayan tarictic hornbill (Penelopides panini), the latest avian addition to the Philippines’ growing list of critically-endangered species. It can be found in the rainforests of Panay, Negros, Masbate, and Guimaras islands. Image by Steve Wilson / Wikimedia CommonsFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by leilani Birds, Conservation, conservation players, Critically Endangered Species, Environmental Policy, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Posted in kiyxelbq

first_imgArticle published by Rebecca Kessler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Bears, Big Cats, Environment, Governance, Green, Human Rights, Politics, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img A court in Tehran last week delivered a guilty verdict in the case of eight Iranian conservationists accused of spying, with sentences ranging from four to 10 years.The eight were all affiliated with the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation, a Tehran-based conservation organization that works to save the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) and other species. The charges appear to be related to allegations that the conservationists used wildlife camera traps for the purpose of espionage.The eight conservationists have been imprisoned since their arrests in January 2018. A colleague arrested at the same time died in custody.Rights groups and conservation organizations have condemned the verdict, alleging serious flaws in the judicial process. A court in Tehran last week delivered a guilty verdict in the case of eight Iranian conservationists accused of spying, with sentences ranging from four to 10 years. The eight were all affiliated with the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation (PWHF), a Tehran-based conservation organization that works to save the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) and other species.PWHF founder Morad Tahbaz and program manager Niloufar Bayani both received 10-year sentences, while cheetah researcher Houman Jowkar and biologist Taher Ghadirian were sentenced to eight years each. Coordinator Sepideh Kashani, big cat conservationist Amirhossein Khaleghi Hamidi and former PWHF staffer Sam Radjabi received six years, while Abdolreza Kouhpayeh, a conservationist and wildlife photographer, received four years.Eight conservationists affiliated with the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation were recently convicted of spying in Iran. Top row, from left: Niloufar Bayani, Taher Ghadirian, Houman Jowkar and Sepideh Kashani. Bottom row, from left: Amirhossein Khaleghi Hamidi, Abdolreza Kouhpayeh, Sam Radjabi and Morad Tahbaz. Images courtesy of AnyHopeForNature.The conservationists have been imprisoned since their arrests in January 2018. PWHF’s volunteer managing director, Kavous Seyed-Emami, a Canadian-Iranian sociology professor, was arrested at the same time. He died the following month in Evin Prison in Tehran. Iranian authorities claimed the death was a suicide and have not permitted an independent investigation, according to Seyed-Emami’s family.Four of the group had faced charges of “sowing corruption on earth,” which can carry the death penalty, but these were dropped in October. According to New York-based NGO Human Rights Watch, the eight were ultimately convicted of “collaborating with the enemy state of the United States.” The charges appear to be related to allegations that the conservationists used wildlife camera traps for the purpose of espionage.The sentences, handed down on Nov. 20 and 23, came amid a sweeping internet blackout and protests around the country, precipitated by an increase in fuel prices. The Center for Human Rights in Iran, an advocacy group based in New York, reported that the eight were given the verdicts verbally, rather than in writing, which it described as “a common practice in politically motivated cases in Iran.”A close relative of one of the jailed PWHF staff who requested anonymity due to the sensitivity of the situation told Mongabay that the conservationists and their supporters were reacting to the verdicts with “despair, and yet determination.” The relative noted that the conservationists have 20 days to lodge an appeal. “From the conservation community, we hope to see very strong reactions,” the relative said. “This is now a conviction and no longer a projected outcome, which was something that some parts of the conservation community was waiting for to react on. Here it is. This could be any one of them working to save our planet … This should be a real serious alarm.”The Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation’s late managing director, Kavous Seyed-Emami, died in prison shortly after his arrest in January 2018. Image courtesy of the Seyed-Emami family.Foreign and domestic responsesThe group’s jailing in 2018 met with international criticism, and news of the verdict and sentences sparked a fresh outcry from human rights and conservation organizations, including the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society, Human Rights Watch, and the IUCN.“Sentencing innocent wildlife conservationists to long jail sentences in the absence of evidence is a travesty of justice and a violation of multiple human rights,” said David Boyd, the U.N. Special Rapporteur on human rights and the environment, in a statement emailed to Mongabay. “In the context of a global biodiversity crisis the work of these conservationists should be admired, not condemned. An appeal should be expedited and their sentences should be overturned.”The secretary-general of the Geneva-based human rights NGO the International Commission of Jurists, Sam Zarifi, said that while his group hadn’t been able to monitor the case due to access restrictions, it did appear there were flaws in the judicial process. “Based on publicly available material, their trial at Branch 15 of the Revolutionary Court suffered from serious due process problems, including defendants’ lack of access to lawyers of their choosing, lack of access to the indictment and underlying evidence, and claims by the defendants that they were tortured in order to provide false confessions,” Zarifi told Mongabay by email.“There is no publicly available indication that the defendants’ claims were investigated properly. So looking at this case from the outside — which is unfortunately as close as we can get — their trial doesn’t seem to have been a fair or credible process,” he said.A critically endangered Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus), of which only 50 remain, all of them in Iran. Image by Tasnim News Agency via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0).The U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP) issued a statement voicing deep concern and calling for clemency. UNEP also confirmed that convicted PWHF program manager Bayani had been a UNEP consultant between 2012 and 2017. Bayani and PWHF founder Tahbaz, a successful businessman, were reportedly also charged with “gaining illegitimate income,” with Bayani reportedly ordered by the court to repay the salary she had earned consulting with UNEP.The case has also raised questions domestically. In November 2018, more than 1,100 conservationists in Iran signed an open letter addressed to the head of the judiciary. They emphasized that over some 20 years of professional interactions the detained conservationists were only known “for serving [their] country and trying their best to protect its nature.”Senior government officials have gone on record saying that investigations had failed to turn up evidence that the detained were spies.Political connectionsWhile no evidence has been made public, one key line of pursuit during interrogations was reportedly the link between PWHF and the founder of the world’s largest big cat conservation organization, Panthera, headquartered in New York. PWHF staff occasionally worked alongside experts from Panthera, using camera traps to monitor cheetah populations. The conservation community has spoken out strongly against the notion that low-quality motion-sensor camera traps could serve any espionage purpose.The founder of Panthera, U.S. billionaire Thomas Kaplan, is active in and provides funding to United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI), a New York-based lobby group that advocates for tough sanctions and regime change in Iran. The group pushed for the U.S. to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal, formally the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), which it did in May 2018.In late 2017, PWHF staff reportedly sought to distance themselves from Panthera following a speech by Kaplan that comprised his first major public show of support for UANI. A letter from PWHF to Panthera voiced “alarm and consternation” at his political activities. Panthera has issued no response to the arrests or verdict and did not respond to requests from Mongabay for comment.Conservation workPWHF’s central mission was the conservation of the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah. Just 50 remain in the world, all of them in Iran. Jowkar, the jailed PWHF cheetah researcher, led the latest IUCN assessment of the species, in 2008. He, Ghadirian and Khaleghi Hamidi were members of the IUCN/SSC Cat Specialist Group, and PWHF had been instrumental in highlighting the plight of the species through a project funded by Iran’s Department of Environment and the U.N. Development Programme (UNDP).The jailed conservationists also worked to protect other species and to raise awareness on environmental issues in a country beset by drought. Ghadirian, PWHF’s consultant on large mammals from 2014 to 2017, undertook population surveys of leopards, wolves and bears using camera traps, tracking, urine and other signs. He worked with herders to find solutions to human-animal conflict.On one of the few phone calls permitted to loved ones from prison, Ghadirian reportedly asked what was going on in his absence with a project on Baluchistan bears (Ursus thibetanus gedrosianus), a critically endangered subspecies of the Asian black bear. He and another biologist had been working in southern Iran to raise awareness of the importance of conserving the species, reduce human-bear conflict and livestock depredation, and push for the establishment of wildlife corridors and a protected area.A Baluchistan bear (Ursus thibetanus gedrosianus) in Iran. The bears are a critically endangered subspecies of the Asian black bear. Image by Ruholah.ahmadi via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).David Garshelis, a bear specialist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and member of the IUCN/SSC Bear Specialist Group, said the research was showing real promise. “Before they started, it wasn’t actually clear that there were still bears in this area,” he said.“[Ghadirian] was very concerned about both sides of the equation, both people and bears,” and sought to address conservation issues holistically, said Garshelis. “He was in elementary schools giving programs, then talking to people in the field — he was trying to address it from every possible level.”Garshelis said he had hoped to visit and work with Ghadirian on the bear project. “We were thinking things might ease up, sometime in the future,” he said.In addition to the jail time, the eight are all reportedly banned from working in the conservation sector for two years from the conclusion of their sentences.A landscape in the Turkmen Sahra region of northeastern Iran. Image by Alireza Javaheri via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Posted in njlmtazq

first_imgAmazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Amazonian town of Alter do Chão in Santarém municipality, Pará state, Brazil attracts 190,000 tourists annually. A battle between environmentalists (wanting to preserve the area’s forests), and land grabbers (wanting to construct high-rises and other profitable infrastructure), has been raging there for many years.As part of the wave of fires sweeping the Amazon this year, widespread blazes were set in the Alter do Chão Reserve. In the wake of the fires, police surprisingly arrested four members of Brigada de Alter, an NGO. The four are volunteer firefighters who helped put out September’s blazes.Mongabay has acquired police arresting documents revealing what lawyers say is “unfounded” and flimsy evidence. Police claimed the four set the fires with the intent of taking photos and selling them to the World Wide Fund for Nature.While the investigation is ongoing, analysts say land grabbers had the best motive for setting the fires. However, critics add, the police focus on the NGO is in line with President Jair Bolsonaro’s ongoing campaign of rhetoric discrediting Brazilian and international socioenvironmental NGOs and undermining their work in the Amazon. Burnt Amazon forest in Alter do Chão in September. Image by Jader Paes/Agência Pará/Fotos Públicas.“Don’t give money to NGOs!” Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro told viewers during a live stream on November 28. His urging came following the arrest of four volunteer firefighters belonging to NGO Brigada de Alter, accused of intentionally starting Amazon wildfires — arrests viewed by many as the latest government attack on the environment and its defenders.A police operation in Pará state accused four environmentalists (Daniel Gutierrez, João Victor Pereira Romano, Gustavo de Almeida Fernandes, and Marcelo Cwerver) of perpetrating the horrific four-day fires in the Alter do Chão Reserve in September, fires which the volunteers helped extinguish. Police also raided the headquarters of another NGO closely linked to the fire brigade, the Health and Happiness Project, and seized documents as part of their investigation.The town of Alter do Chão — site of the fires — is a popular tourist destination nicknamed the “Brazilian Caribbean,” with forests and a paradisiacal stretch of white sand beach that has been an Amazon battleground for decades, seeing fights between murky real estate interests and conservationists.“Alter [do Chão] lives 100 percent off tourism,” says Alter do Chão community council president Junior Sousa. “People are scared that [the natural locale] will become a place full of buildings that no one wants to visit.”The town of just 6,000 residents, part of Santarém municipality, attracts 190,000 tourists annually according to the Santarém Tourist Department, drawn there by its intact tropical scenery and crystal clear waters. But segments of the real estate sector, along with land grabbers, keen on gaining a slice of increasingly valuable land, want looser environmental protections. Some analysists suggest the fires were likely set by unknown members of these groups taking the law into their own hands.The town is divided in two. According to local sources (some of which requested anonymity for safety reasons), on one side, there is a rich oligarchy of families who want to develop modern beachfront buildings and condominiums. On the other, ecotourism businesses and civil society who are against edification. In a series of protests over the last years, the pro-nature group has been successful in barring changes that would allow for large-scale business ventures.The four volunteer firefighters after their first press conference. Their heads were shaved upon arrest. Daniel Gutierrez, João Victor Pereira Romano, Gustavo de Almeida Fernandes, and Marcelo Cwerver are long-time environmentalists and run ecotourism businesses in Alter do Chão. Image by Tiago Silveira.A history of NGO harassmentThe arrest of the four Fire Brigade members, who were also on the frontlines extinguishing the September wildfires, sparked surprise and outrage from Brazilian civil society who say the bogus charges aim to discredit the work of reputable NGOs in the Amazon. “This attempt at criminalizing and persecuting NGOs that have a history of dedication to the protection of the forest is unacceptable,” said former environment minister Marina Silva on Twitter.The four men were released shortly after their arrest, though continue to be under investigation. They donned bright yellow shirts emblazoned with the volunteer fire brigade logo, and spoke to the press: “We receive daily threats from WhatsApp groups from Alter do Chão. That really scares us,” said Daniel Gutierrez. “We just want to go back to our normal lives and continue working with the fire brigade.”The fire brigade isn’t the only NGO under assault in the town. “We are being massacred and threatened,” says Caetano Scannavino, coordinator for the Health and Happiness Project. “There is an ongoing defamation campaign against NGOs and anyone linked to environmental and indigenous movements.”Just two days before the arrests, members representing the area’s environmental and indigenous organizations submitted an official complaint alleging irregularities in the construction of a condominium complex. That complaint came as one of the most recent rounds in the decades-long battle over zoning, development and conservation in Alter do Chão.A 2017 bill sought to change zoning rules allowing construction of high-rise buildings and legalizing extensive deforestation, but was defeated. Local NGOs say they remain in the forefront of efforts preventing abrasive development and profit-led degradation, while preserving the natural character of the Brazilian Caribbean. “We managed to revert the bill,” Scannavino told Mongabay, “and it is possible that this bothered other sectors.”Santarém Mayor Nélio Aguiar says there are sufficiently rigorous environmental laws in place, and believes that those regulations are vital to the local economy. But he adds, “We need to conciliate development with nature using ecological tourism as a key tool.” The mayor called this year’s fires criminal, and was surprised to see the volunteers hauled in as suspects. “This is a group of volunteers that were trained by public firefighters and their mission is to combat the fires,” Aguiar noted.Volunteer firefighters hug family members after their conditional release on bail. Image courtesy of Brigada Alter do Chão/Fotos Públicas.Evidence against fire brigade flimsyIn an audio file obtained by news media outlet Repórter Brasil, Aguiar phoned the state governor Helder Barbalho during the fires, asking for help to contain the flames and warning that armed men who have the support of the police are behind the fires, casting suspicion on the validity of the local police report fingering the NGO.The impartiality of Alexandre Rizzi, the judge issuing the fire brigade arrest and search warrant, was also called into question, when a 1994 news clip surfaced of him criticizing Greenpeace activists for protesting illegal wood harvesting. Rizzi, the owner of Maderizzi, a now-defunct logging company, says his past has no bearing on his ability to fairly judge the case: “I have never had conflict with any organizations.… I carry on firm and ready to judge any citizen regardless of creed, ideology or political party,” Rizzi said. State-level police have been given 30 days to complete their investigation. Critics say the arrest and search warrants Rizzi signed contain “no evidence.”Mongabay gained access to the police files. Among the proof presented is an intercepted quote by Gustavo de Almeida Fernandes, one of the accused ande Health and Happiness Project’s logistics director. He tells an unnamed caller: “There’s going to be a lot of fire, including on the routes you’ll be on.”The police interpreted this as incriminatory: “it is clear that he is referring to orchestrated fires since it’s not possible to foresee the location of a fire,” said the report. But Defense lawyer Michel Durans dismisses that possibility, noting that the location of contested forests is common knowledge to local residents.In another intercepted communication, one fire brigade volunteer is described as being the person who “most burns” and “puts out green in the Amazon,” an apparent joking reference to the fire brigade member’s marijuana smoking. The investigation interprets the statement as an admission of guilt.A day after the arrests, the Federal Police Bureau came forward, saying that a federal investigation of the fires has been underway since September, but with opposite findings. “No elements point to the participation of volunteer firefighters or civil society organizations,” it said in a statement. “On the contrary, the federal investigation points to land grabbers, disorderly occupation and real estate speculation as the causes of environmental damage in Alter.”Mongabay reached out to both federal and state police but was informed neither were giving interviews.Police report excerpt screen shot Portuguese translation to English: In an intercepted conversation between Gustavo, the director of logistics at NGO Project Health and Happiness, and the caller identified as Cecilia, he warns her to come prepared to Alter do Chão, because, in his own words, “there will be a lot of fire, including on the routes that you’ll be passing” [Note: not an exact quote] making it perceptible that he is referring to orchestrated fires since it’s not possible to predict, even at this time of year, the dates and locations where there will be fire […]Bolsonaro’s inflammatory roleA surge in August-September wildfires and 2019 deforestation has come in the wake of President Jair Bolsonaro’s anti-environmental rhetoric, reportedly emboldening ranchers, farmers and land grabbers to commit crimes without fear of prosecution. Wildfires explicitly set in the president’s name occurred on Aug 10, called the Day of Fire, in Novo Progresso municipality in Pará state.Also since Bolsonaro came to power, federal environmental agency employees have faced firing and intimidation and his administration has announced plans to open indigenous territories to mining. In August, the president fired the director of the Brazilian Institute of Space Research (INPE) after dubbing as a “a lie” new data showing a sharp increase in Amazon deforestation. Recent satellite data shows a 41 percent increase in deforestation in the state of Pará between 2018 and 2019.Bolsonaro early on blamed NGOs for this year’s Amazon wildfires without any evidence: “This could be criminal activity by those ‘NGOers’ to damage my reputation and the Brazilian government,” he told journalists outside the presidential palace.The police statement against the fire brigade seems to be in line with Bolsonaro’s narrative. It claims that the volunteers set the fires in order to sell pictures to the World Wildlife Foundation for personal financial gain. The accused, who work as tourist guides in the region, stress that their volunteer work is unpaid and that their aim is to protect nature.Their lawyers refute police accusations, calling the evidence so far presented “unfounded.” Durans notes that “The audio transcripts and videos presented so far are incredibly fragile and have been analyzed completely out of context.”The governor of Pará, Helder Barbalho, replaced the head of investigations on Nov 28 to “clear things up in the fastest and most transparent way,” and police Internal Affairs is now investigating the case.Banner image caption: The four volunteer firefighters accused of setting the fires. Image by Tiago Silveira.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

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first_imgA devastated mother-of-two says she is at her wits end with the breakdown of her Letterkenny home due to defective building blocks.Yvonne and Michael Shevlin and their two children Sarah, 11, and Michael Jnr, 6, are living in an apartment that she says is ‘crumbling away’ as it was built with bricks contaminated with Mica.Yvonne and Michael bought the apartment in 2007 as a young couple with the aim of buying a house in the future, but those plans where left in tatters when problems started arising in 2013. Minor problems started arising six-years-ago for the Shevlin’s.Yvonne spoke of the devastation of paying a mortgage on a home ‘that should be demolished’ because it is decaying around her family.“There is no one out there to help you, I can tell you that straight away.“The legal system couldn’t help us, neither could health and safety, and the government have been dragging their feet for the last several years.”Yvonne spoke of her fear of living in the apartment, which has considerably deteriorated over the last week following bad weather periods recently. “The crack on the side of the apartment has got bigger and it has twisted the building and you can see right into the cavity of the wall at this point.“It’s as if the front of the apartment is going to fall out, that’s what it looks like to me.“We’ve never had the founds tested but, we know ourselves that they are deteriorating rapidly. There was a bit that has already busted out and the blocks are falling out as well.“We had to pave and cement a new entrance into our apartment because the main path is beside a big crack and I just know it is going to go at any stage.”Yvonne Shevlin’s apartment wall with cavity exposed as the presence of Mica is causing the brickwork to absorb water and cause cracking to internal and external walls.Mrs Shevlin explained how the family cannot afford to move out of the hazardous environment because they have a ‘worthless mortgage’ to pay each month. “You couldn’t sell our apartment for 50 cents and we have a mortgage on it,” she explained.“We can’t pay that mortgage and afford to rent somewhere else, there is not a hope of that happening. So where can we go from here?“We have been promised so many deadlines, but that means nothing to us.“We need immediate help.” As thousands of families like the Shevlin’s suffer due to the Mica scandal across the county, Donegal Daily understands that ‘under the arm’ legislation was to be produced in the Dail the same day as the Children’s Hospital overrun scheme.The Minister for Housing said in January that work on developing the scheme is “well underway” and that he intends to “revert to Government with proposals for the scheme as soon as possible.”A crack at the front of the Shevlin family apartment home in LetterkennyHowever, a source close to the situation said at the eleventh hour the bill was pulled due to additional questions being required but ultimately ‘it would have been political suicide for the Government’ following the backlash over the Children’s Hospital overspend scandal.It was also revealed on Wednesday that Donegal was among the hardest hit by spending cuts.A representative from the Mica Action Group said that they too have concerns the redress scheme could be in jeopardy because of the recent cuts.The spokesperson said: “There is always fears from our side and we have been expressing those fears regularly for months.“The homeowners have a right to be frightened by this news and when we heard about the A5 and each department being asked to make additional cuts, it is always at the forefront of our mind.“We ask our government representatives all the time about this and we were assured that there will be no issues in terms of these recent cuts.”The group insists, although they believe the scheme will go ahead in due course, they won’t allow the government to delay this scheme any longer than it needs to be.“It just can’t happen, it quite simply cannot happen. We won’t let it (be delayed further) first of all, and we would have to think about how we would move forward because peoples lives are at genuine risk at this point.“We know that term is thrown around a lot, but as we see some of the videos surfacing online, you can now see that is becoming a reality.“Sooner or later somebody’s house is going to collapse down on top of them.“We’ve had enough of the pandering about and rubber stamping, the scheme needs to go ahead as quickly as possible.”Homeowners in Donegal and Mayo continue to wait on the scheme to be rolled out despite government promises that work would begin before Christmas 2018.“I was taking a video the other day and my young son came over and he said, ‘Is this building going to fall down mammy?’ and I had to tell him no,” Yvonne added. “But I am living in fear with different situations in this apartment including the gas because the place is cracking.“There is no health and safety officer to tell us that this house is not safe to live in.“There is a fire hazard as well but, yet, we have to live in it because we have a mortgage on it.  We are really trying to make this place as safe as possible to live in.”She said the worry is constant for the family and added: “There is only one thing that would need to be done to this apartment and that would be for it to be completely demolished.“Unless you replace every block and found in that building you could never be sure it is safe to live in.’Through no fault of our own, we have bought a faulty house and we can do nothing about it’ – Yvonne ShevlinFollowing persistent bad weather across Donegal, cracks have began to stretch in size.’People are buying homes in Ireland and for these people not to be getting looked after straight away is a disgrace’ – Yvonne ShevlinShevlin is reassured that the situation will be resolved in the future but she insisted their family situation needed an urgent response.“The Mica Action Group are great, they continue to push and that is good for them, but it is the immediate need for redress and I don’t see it in the near future because there is so much testing that needs to be done.“I’ve waited that long, it will be a drawn-out process and by that stage it will be too late because families are suffering.“The stress of living in that apartment wondering what is going to happen. I just let the kids go out and play on the green because I wouldn’t let them play near the house at all, it is too dangerous.“People are buying homes in Ireland and for these people not to be getting looked after straight away is a disgrace.“Joe McHugh has said that it has been passed at cabinet level, but again, that means nothing to us.“We have had deadlines, upon deadlines, upon deadlines pushed back.“I’m exhausted,” Shevlin said.Having dealt with the situation for the last six years, the emotional mother said she can’t move her life forward and has fears she will enter into another winter living in the rotting apartment.“You can understand how stressful having to go through a situation like this is.“We have two young children in an unsafe house, it is always on your mind.“Every time it rains or bad weather comes are way it is constantly there and you can’t move forward. Your life is hanging in the balance because you can’t dream of moving on to a bigger and better home with the children.“I was surprised that the house has stood this long, to be honest,’ Shevlin added.“But next year it will not stay standing and I could not stay in it for another winter.“But where could we go? There is nowhere to turn.”“It puts a lot of pressure on you as a person and in the family. I was so surprised when my son came up and said that to me that night because I thought he was just playing away.“All that takes its toll on you,” she admitted. “My children are safer at school than they are in their own home and that is not right.“We are standing here jumping up and down trying to grab the attention of anybody who will help and it feels like it is just no big deal, just no big deal at all to them.“I did have a conversation with Damien English in Carndonagh last year and I asked him if we could even fix these houses even a little bit, due to the fear I have for my kids, and I was told not to touch the house at all.“At that point, I just broke down and I started to cry, and I don’t understand how these people don’t see this like we do every day.“It was a big investment for a young couple, we have now had a family and we can’t move on.“Through no fault of our own, we have bought a faulty house and we can do nothing about it.Letterkenny mother’s living nightmare in crumbling Mica home was last modified: February 20th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:letterkennyMICAlast_img read more

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first_imgA former Brevard High School band director has pleaded guilty to sex charges involving a student.Kenneth Franklin, of Brevard, is a former band teacher at Brevard High School. On Thursday, March 3, 2016, Franklin pled guilty to five counts of indecent liberties with a student, a class I felony.During the fall of 2014, an investigation into Franklin began when the administration of Brevard High School and the Transylvania County Sheriff’s Office received an anonymous tip alleging misconduct between Franklin and his students. The investigation revealed that Franklin was having an inappropriate sexual relationship with one of his female students.Franklin was sentenced to 10 years of supervised probation. Franklin cannot have any contact with the victim, cannot possess a firearm, and must register as a sex offender for a period of 30 years.last_img read more

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