first_imgSiomilarly, at a recent function organised by the port of Felixstowe to welcome the maiden call of the CSCL Globe, chief executive Clemence Chen revealed last year’s throughput at the UK’s largest port had topped 4m teu, a 10% increase over 2013.According to the SCFI, the Shanghai-Med leg declined by $54 per teu, a drop of 3.8%, to finish the week at $1,373.In contrast, rates jumped 13.3% on the transpacific leg to the US west coast to $2,242 per feu and 6.3% on the all-water Asia-US east coast by $295 to $4,978 per feu ahead of general rate increases set to be introduced by carriers on Monday of $600 feu for all US ports.The Transpacific Stabilisation Agreement (TSA) said recent reversals in carrier financials on the trade, with several returning to profit, were the result of “cost-cutting as revenues have shown only marginal improvement over time”.TSA executive administrator Brian Conrad said: “This is a very challenging operating environment for transpacific container lines and it is critical to maintaining service levels that they not leave money on the table during the lunar new year period.”Of course, the port congestion crisis gripping the US west coast is also a contributory factor.This week the G6 Alliance cancelled a slew of sailings from Asia into the west coast – even if US importers hope to load their goods from Asia before Chinese New Year kicks in, the likelihood is that it will not be an inconsiderable wait for that cargo to be unloaded, while the increased costs will be borne by shippers and carriers alike.The silver lining to this is being seen by vessel owners, with the box ship idle fleet falling to its lowest level since August 2011, according to research this week by Alphaliner.“Some 40 units of 4,000- 10,000 teu are now deployed as extra sailers, either carriers’ ships that would otherwise have been idle during the low season or ships chartered on the spot market for this purpose,” it said, pointing to three Yang Ming and one Maersk fixture last week that were entirely due to the carriers needing extra capacity while vessels are waiting to berth at ports up and down the coast.However, the analyst also doubted whether this might mean a reversal in the fortunes of non-vessel operating owners, who now resent some 95% of the capacity of the fleet that is still unemployed.“Although containership charter rates were highly correlated to freight rates prior to 2008, the relationship has broken down since 2009.“While freight rates have undergone significant fluctuations during the period from 2009-2015, charter rates have remained largely depressed due to the tonnage overcapacity and, when the supply tends to become tighter, by the pressure exerted by the large carriers,” it said. Freight rates on the Asia-Europe trade continued to flounder this week, according to today’s Shanghai Containerised Freight Index, while the trades between Asia and the US west and east coasts climbed ahead of new general rate increase.The Shanghai-North Europe leg declined by 8.4% to settle at $1,057 per teu, although with bunker prices still remaining at recent lows – notwithstanding the increase of the last couple of days – that rate is still in positive territory for carriers.The trade continues to confuse and bemuse observers – the general prognosis over the last 12 months has been that of relative health.Consider the fortunes of Hong Kong-based G6 Alliance member OOCL, which released its latest quarterly update last week which reported that Asia-Europe far outperformed any of its other markets. Quarter four volumes grew by 12.1% to reach 247,014 teu, compared with 220,429 teu in the last quarter of 2013. The full year result was even better – volumes reached 979,659 teu, compared with 843,652 teu in 2013, growth of 16.1%. By Gavin van Marle 06/02/2015last_img read more

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first_imgFrom the rumours we’ve been covering in the past few weeks, three clubs had been pointed out as likely destinations for him: the Hammers, Benfica and a Chinese side.Now earlier today, we’ve covered Benfica’s statement saying they had never been in contact for the Brazilian player. Newspaper Correio da Manhã disagreed, saying the Eagles only gave up due to the high demands.But outlet A Bola also has a take on the situation, with heavy claims saying that the 25-year-old could indeed play for the Hammers next season.Embed from Getty ImagesA Bola says that the player’s agent Adriano Spadotto is currently in London negotiating with the West Ham. The representative’s presence in the English capital had already been reported by O Jogo on Friday.As Bernard’s contract with Shakhtar expired last month, all West Ham need to do is to convince him with a good personal offer.A Bola also adds that it’s ‘certain’ that his future will not be in China, given their window has closed. And that pretty much puts the Hammers in the lead.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksTrending TodayForge of Empires – Free Online GameWill You Build The Most Beautiful City?Forge of Empires – Free Online GameUndoRaid: Shadow Legends | Free DownloadEven Non-Gamers Are Obsessed With This RPG Game (It’s Worth Installing!)Raid: Shadow Legends | Free DownloadUndoDating.comFind out where single guys are hanging out in Tung ChungDating.comUndoStanChart by CNBC CatalystDigitization in Banks Is No Longer About Efficiency, but Business Resilience. Don’t Get Left Behind.StanChart by CNBC CatalystUndoInstant Voice TranslatorGenius Japanese Invention Allows You To Instantly Speak 43 LanguagesInstant Voice TranslatorUndoCNBC InternationalSingapore’s Freelancers Find New Income During the Coronavirus Pandemic.CNBC InternationalUndoKeto减肥1個簡單的妙招一夜「融化」腹部贅肉(今晚試試)Keto减肥UndoCNN with DBS BankWhat Banks Did To Help Corporations Mitigate Future CrisesCNN with DBS BankUndoTheTopFiveVPNEnjoy Netflix Now Without Any RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPNUndo It’s starting to look like West Ham are being left alone in the race for the former Shakhtar Donetsk winger Bernard, at least for now.last_img read more

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first_imgSustainable timber operations have the potential to protect huge swaths of tropical rainforest, but the majority of companies do not have adequate safeguards for the forest holdings they control.New analysis investigates the Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) policies of 97 companies that manage an area of rainforest greater than the whole of California.Companies with good policies are more likely to attract investment because they are protecting their assets over the long-term Forestry companies that manage huge areas of rainforest in the tropics have failed to commit themselves to policies of “zero deforestation,” according to an analysis of their environmental policies by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).The latest report from ZSL’s Sustainability Policy Transparency Toolkit (SPOTT) initiative shows that of the 97 companies it assesses, 77 control land that is not protected from being clear-felled to make way for agricultural plantations or other uses.The companies investigated by ZSL have a combined landbank of nearly 47 million hectares (116 million acres), an area 15 times the size of Belgium or a little greater than California.The SPOTT analysis even found flaws in the policies of those 20 companies that do commit themselves to sustainable, selective logging: only 11 of them require all their suppliers to uphold the zero-deforestation commitment, and only 12 have adequate reporting systems to monitor deforestation, ZSL says.The way in which forestry companies manage these assets is vital, said SPOTT manager Oliver Cupit. “Though forestry operations are not the primary cause of land clearances, they are responsible for degradation,” he said. “Once you have taken out the most valuable timbers, that reduces the financial viability of the holding, and that can lead to encroachment from mining and agriculture.”Courtesy ZSL.Well-run forestry activities actually protect tropical biodiversity better than no activity at all, Cupit added. “It is better that it goes on than the forest has no financial value, which can make it more prone to more aggressive conversion such as agriculture,” he said.The holdings of forestry companies also play a vital role in mitigating the impacts of climate change, by reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation, ZSL said.SPOTT assesses the companies on the public disclosure of their policies, operations and commitments to environmental, social and governance (ESG) best practices. Each company is given an overall percentage score as a measure of its exposure to these risks.A forest scene. Photo by Chris Ransom courtesy of ZSL.The top-performing companies tend to be headquartered in Europe, South America or South Asia, while the majority of those that came out worst were either based in China or African countries, such as the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) or Gabon, where forestry is a significant industry.The SPOTT data reveal an improvement in the scores since last year for the better-performing companies, and a decline for those doing badly. “If they already have a certain level of transparency, companies are encouraged by having a good score and want to engage with us more,” Cupit said. “They know they can use the marketing benefits of having a good SPOTT score to appeal to investors.”Courtesy ZSL.The 50 worst-performing companies, in contrast, all achieved an overall score of less than 10 percent, and SPOTT was unable to assess many of them for numerous indicators. The two worst-performing companies are both Chinese, and ZSL was only able to assess them for less than half of the total score available. “Engaging the lower-scoring countries is the tricky part of what we do,” Cupit said.SPOTT also found that only six out of the 97 companies were assessing the predicted impacts of climate change on the forestry sector. Increasingly frequent droughts, more extreme weather events, and exposure to new tree pests and diseases are three of the main repercussions of rising global temperatures, and these could affect timber yields and therefore company profits, ZSL said.According to Cupit, it is in the interests of logging companies to ensure their operations are sustainable because it’s something that financial backers pay increasing attention to. “The investment community is looking at natural commodity investment more and more through the lens of Environmental, Social and Governance risk,” he said.Woodbois is a U.K.-headquartered, publicly listed forestry company that manages 340,000 hectares (840,000 acres) of tropical forest in, primarily, Gabon, and it achieved seventh place in the SPOTT analysis with a score of just under 70 percent. According to its head of corporate development and strategy, Ashkan Rahmati, there’s a good reason for Woodbois managing its holdings on a sustainable basis.“From a commercial perspective, the forest is our asset, and if you don’t manage it correctly, then its value diminishes,” Rahmati said. “We want our asset to still [be] there in 30 years’ time.”The company trades predominantly in a timber species called okoumé (Aucoumea klaineana). Trade in okoumé, which is used in construction or to manufacture furniture and plywood, is not restricted by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), though the species is classified as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.Courtesy ZSL.“We don’t harvest anything on Appendix I or II of CITES,” Rahmati said. “Even if they’ve got a quota [i.e. on Appendix II], they shouldn’t be harvested.”Woodbois practices what it calls selective logging. Before any harvesting operation begins, the concession is inspected, and trees with a trunk diameter in the appropriate range are marked to be taken out. “At the moment, we typically take out 1.5 trees per hectare — that’s probably out of between 600-1,000 trees in a hectare in total,” Rahmati said.One area where Woodbois did not perform well was in its commitment to obtain certification, such as that offered by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), for its operations. It has pledged to gain FSC certification by 2029.“Our business has been in the form of a turn-around over the past 18 months, and getting accreditation is a long and expensive process,” Rahmati said.Banner image: Timber packaged for delivery. Photo courtesy ZSL.About the reporter: James Fair is a wildlife conservation and environmental journalist based in England. You can find him on Twitter at @Jamesfairwild. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this article. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Forest Destruction, Forest Products, Forests, Rainforests, Supply Chain, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgArticle published by Willie Shubert Climate Activism, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Climate Politics, Human Rights, United Nations Youth activists taking part in the global climate strike have underscored the urgency of taking meaningful action to mitigate the environmental and humanitarian disasters posed by the climate crisis.Many low-lying territories in Asia and the Pacific are already struggling with rising sea levels, posing a major challenge for governments dealing with unprecedented levels of internal displacement.The activists have also filed a petition with the U.N. Human Rights Commission, seeking to hold polluters accountable for the human rights violations arising from the climate crisis.They also want to countries like the Philippines, one of those considered most vulnerable to climate change impacts, to fight harder for justice from richer, more polluting countries. NEW YORK CITY — Climate change continues to pose an existential threat to many low-lying Asian and the Pacific island countries, with rising seas putting people’s lives, livelihoods, environment and culture at risk. At a more extreme level, some communities are already being relocated because of rising oceans, making movements across borders a worrisome reality of the future for many people, especially the young generation.“Our existence is at stake. The consequences of a burning planet is coming and is already felt in many parts of the world by our people,” said Lavetanalagi Seru, coordinator of the Fiji-based Alliance for Future Generations. “We are on a suicidal [course] and we need to act courageously, urgently and boldly. And that human rights should underpin the actions we take.”Seru was among thousands of protesters, many of them youths like himself, gathered in New York on Sept. 20 for a global climate strike to highlight the urgency of tackling climate change. Having arrived from his village in Fiji, Seru brought the dire message that some islands have already been submerged completely and that more people will be forced to move in the coming years, which will pose a massive challenge for regional governments in terms of dealing with internal displacement.“Young people have certainly realized the gravity of the climate catastrophe, and the possibility of inheriting an inhabitable planet. We share our frustrations of the lack of political will and climate inaction from our leaders and from our governments. Let us rise to the challenge … or we shall be judged by a jury that is yet to be born,” he said.In 2016 Hurricane Winston, a category 5 storm, battered this school in Tailevu Province, Fiji. Image by Australian Department of Foreign Affairs via Flickr.At the protest in New York, one of a series that took place in 150 cities around the world that same day, the young protesters chanted “this is what democracy looks like” and “climate justice now.” Children and adults alike carried banners and placards as they marched in unison along the streets of New York. The mass protest evolved from a solitary show of defiance by Swedish student Greta Thunberg  two years ago, and hit a high this week ahead of the United Nations climate summit in New York.“We are yet not done. We are just getting started,” said Alexandria Villaseñor, co-founder of US Youth Climate Strike. “For the past year, the youth has become the moral voice on the climate crisis, urging adults and world leaders to listen to scientists and take action for as long as it takes. The future of our generation and all humanity is at stake. And we will not stop until we will have one.”In October last year, the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCCC) released a stark warning that the world needs to make a rapid and deep cut in greenhouse gas emissions to hold global warming to a maximum of 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) over the pre-industrial baseline.Villaseñor said young people were demanding that world leaders and governments attending the U.N. climate summit respond to their pleas to stop all fossil fuel infrastructure projects globally and transition to a 100 percent renewable energy economy. They are also demanding that polluters be held accountable for the damage they are causing to the planet.“We are expecting world leaders to take bold climate action in order to give us the stable climate system that is our right as young people and as the generation that will be affected by the climate crisis,” Villaseñor said. “If our demands are not met at the U.N. Climate Summit, we are coming back again, larger and fiercer each time.”Speaking before more than 250,000 people who joined the march in New York, Thunberg said young people will spearhead the pressure on governments to address the public demands to address the climate crisis.“This is an emergency. Our house is on fire,” she told the crowd at Battery Park in Manhattan. “It is not just the young people’s house. We all live here and it affects all of us. We will not just stand aside and watch.”Demonstrators at the New York City Climate Strike in September 2019. Image by Imelda Abano for Mongabay.NGO supportVarious environmental and human rights organizations have also supported the youth-led massive march for climate action.Naderev “Yeb” Saño, executive director of Greenpeace Southeast Asia, called the climate strike a demonstration of the collective indignation of peoples and movements around the world, buoyed by fresh energy from the world’s children and youths clamoring for climate justice and ambitious action.“The strikes represent the will of the people,” he said, “and as we lose faith in our political and business leaders, we gain hope and inspiration that the people will rise up and make another world possible, and we will be unstoppable.”Saño cited the example of the Philippines, which this past week filed a petition with the U.N. Commission on Human Rights to hold big polluters accountable for the human rights implications of the climate crisis. He said the final memorandum filed with the commission summarizes the scientific and legal evidence about how carbon majors have contributed significantly to climate change and human rights impacts.“It will show how the fossil fuel industry misled and deceived the public on the science and the climate harms these have caused and continue to cause the Filipinos,” Saño added.Leon Dulce, national coordinator of the Kalikasan People’s Network for the Environment, a Philippine NGO, said the lack of political will from governments to address climate change is bizarre.“Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, for instance, must immediately declare a ‘climate emergency’ that would expedite a comprehensive climate adaptation and resiliency package that will subsidize our farmers, workers and marginalized communities for long-term ecosystems protection and restoration, disaster risk reduction, and economic and social protection,” Dulce said.He added such a declaration must also lay out a master plan for a just transition toward renewable energy and national industrialization based on people’s needs, as well as put in place a mechanism for international advocacy to call on top climate-polluting countries and corporations to commit to deep and drastic emissions cuts and adaptation fund pledges.“As a consistently top climate-vulnerable nation, the Philippine government is not doing enough to keep us afloat in the deluge of climate crisis,” Dulce said.Philip Alston, co-chair of New York University’s Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, said “human rights will be rendered increasingly meaningless unless we act immediately.”“Climate change has been called a ‘false alarm’ but it is an alarm that will end up killing many of our children, and at least some of us,” Alston said. “The future disasters flowing from climate change are moving from possibilities to certainties.”This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Posted in kirlkiav

first_imgWhile the Madrid United Nations climate summit (COP25) isn’t expected to yield major strides forward in the effort to curb the climate crisis, that hasn’t stopped hundreds of thousands of environmental activists from being there in the remote hope of influencing negotiators to act decisively.One such person is Laura Vargas, born in the Peruvian Andes, who saw her native home polluted and desecrated by the giant La Oroya copper smelting plant. At age 71, the former nun and socioenvironmental activist is in Madrid as part of the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative (IRI).The IRI hopes to leverage the voices and votes of millions of people of faith in five tropical nations — Brazil, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Indonesia, Colombia and Peru — in order to slow rapidly spreading deforestation, the destruction of biodiversity, and oppression of indigenous peoples.Vargas’ passion and energy is devoted to “caring for God’s creation” which encompasses all of nature, including humanity, and especially children. Her presence in Madrid, and the presence of half a million others like her protesting in the streets, could be the most hopeful news and potent force coming out of the COP25 summit. Looking toward heaven in the Indonesian rainforest. The Interfaith Rainforest Initiative (IRI) is an alliance of Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu and Taoist religious leaders, their congregations and indigenous peoples seeking to harness the political power held by the faithful to save the world’s last great rainforests. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.MADRID, Spain — As a child growing up in the high Andes of central Peru, Laura Vargas remembers the transformative power of nature — blue skies and a crystal clear mountain river, the Montaro, in which she swam with her cousins and with “so many beautiful fish.”But “it wasn’t long before that river was dead,” Vargas recalls in an interview over breakfast during the United Nations Climate Summit (COP25) here in Madrid. “I lived in a village downstream from La Oroya, which the world knows as one of the most polluted places on earth. The [immense copper] smelting plant there destroyed the river and everything in it.”However unwittingly, that clash between industry and nature put Vargas on a path toward environmental activism. And she is a force.At 71 and just 4-foot-9, Vargas commands attention and demands accountability of both Peru’s political and industrial leaders — especially when it comes to protecting the country’s bountiful rainforests and the indigenous peoples who live among a Noah’s Ark boatload of biodiversity in the Amazon.“As there are human rights, nature has rights, too,” Vargas says. “Forests are not just trees; they are a system of life. Every living thing in the forest has a role, and everything is connected. As those living things are a part of nature, they are a part of us, too.”Vargas is applying her spirituality and vision to a new, and potentially influential, form of religious activism. She is the Peruvian coordinator of the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative (IRI). The multidenominational group formed in 2017, had a presence at COP24 in 2018, and has raised its international profile since September during and after the special UN Climate Action summit in New York City.IRI aims to leverage the voices and votes of millions of people of faith in five tropical countries for the purpose of slowing the scourge of rapidly spreading deforestation, the ongoing destruction of biodiversity, and the oppression of indigenous peoples living there.Laura Vargas grew up in La Oroya, a Peruvian city of 33,000 people that for 77 years, from 1922 to 2009, supported a booming copper, zinc and lead smelting plant. The nearby mine and in-town factory provided jobs while also turning this high Andes community into one of the most polluted cities on earth. Image by Jason Houston.More than prayer“This (initiative) isn’t about churches planting trees,” says Joe Corcoran, IRI program manager with UNEP, the United Nations Environment Programme. “We want to say clearly and definitively to world leaders: religious leaders take this issue of forests and climate very seriously, and they are going to be holding public officials accountable to make sure these issues are addressed.”To that end, Vargas, a Catholic from Lima, and two IRI colleagues — Elias Szcztynicki, an orthodox Jew also from Lima and Blanca Echeverry, an Anglican from Colombia — increased the visibility of IRI during the first week of COP25, the Conference of the Parties.They too met with leaders from tropical countries and spoke at three side events, including the High Level Meeting on Forests at the Chilean pavilion on December 5 attended by more than 200 people.“We are not here to preach, as in worship services,” says Szcztynicki. “We are here to work with those in influential positions to help stop deforestation and affect climate change.”The countries on which IRI is focused contain 70% of the world’s remaining tropical forests. They include Brazil, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Indonesia, Colombia and Peru.Those nations are seeing their natural capacity to regulate the earth’s climate diminished every day by rampant deforestation due to wildfires, mining, timber harvesting, agribusiness, roads, dams and other infrastructure construction.Growing global political instability caused the COP25 venue to shift three times, as it was tossed from nation to nation like an orphaned child. First, the anti-environmental Jair Bolsonaro government of Brazil backed out of hosting the summit; Chile stepped into the breach, but was forced to give up sponsorship due to civil unrest; then with barely a month to organize, Madrid took on the hefty responsibility as host. Image by Justin Catanoso.Called to accountPeruvian President Martin Vizcarra dissolved Congress several months ago; as a result, party leaders are putting up new candidates to run for office in April 2020’s general election. Vargas has arranged a forum in Lima for December 16, to which the leaders of the nation’s eight top political parties have been invited to discuss their environmental and human rights priorities.“We want to hear their proposals and decide who we want to support,” Vargas says of the public forum. “Once they get elected to Congress, we want to hold them accountable for their promises.”Earlier this year, Vargas was successful in motivating Fabiola Munoz, Peru’s influential minister of the environment, to sign IRI’s Faith for Forests Declaration, which in part states: “We commit to advocating for governments to adopt, fulfill and expand upon commitments to protect forests and the rights of indigenous peoples. We will cast our ballots for those that stand for rainforests and environmental defenders.”“Often, the religious community does not have projects in the field, so this is very different,” Szcztynicki says. “We understand, for example, that 50% of Peru’s carbon emissions come from deforestation. We also understand that indigenous peoples are the best protectors of our rainforests. We want to impact climate change, so we advocate for their rights.”Indigenous Ticana children in Colombia. Their future depends on people like Laura Vargas, working together around the globe to conserve rainforests. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.Women and children came firstVargas says her work with IRI is a natural outgrowth of a life of service. She became a nun in her 20s, but left the convent after six years because the Catholic Church in Peru at the time — in fending off the rise of evangelicals — chose to direct sisters to teach English to wealthy Peruvian Catholics.“I was drawn to the poor, so I left the sisters to follow my dream,” Vargas recalls.For 16 years, she worked on the outskirts of Lima with impoverished women, teaching them to read and write. She witnessed the power of literacy as previously embarrassed mothers proudly signed their names to school forms for their children instead of leaving behind a fingerprint.Vargas survived Peru’s many years of civil unrest and political violence in which an estimated 70,000 ultimately died, and joined the Bishops’ Commission on Social Action in 1989. Teaming up with her friend and environmental crusader Archbishop Pedro Barreto of Huancayo — spiritual overseer of the region that includes the polluted city of La Oroya — Vargas merged human rights activism with environmental outreach. Too many La Oroya children suffered from lead poisoning due to the smelting plant. She wanted to help.To her, it was all about “caring for God’s creation.” It wasn’t long before she made the connection between Peru’s rampant Amazon deforestation and diminished rainfall patterns due to climate change. When IRI needed a coordinator in Peru, she was eager to volunteer.“Laura was a pioneer in the Catholic church in Peru, the first woman to hold an executive position in the social ministry,” Szcztynicki says. “She has a very, very long history in faith-based activism and human rights. For her to work with other faiths in nothing new.”As Vargas leaves Madrid and COP25 this week to return home to Lima, she is fully aware of the daunting fight ahead — prodding reluctant politicians to keep their promises to the environment.She smiles and says she’s ready: “IRI has given me a goal of defending life and nature on a global scale, and a deeper sense of purpose.”Justin Catanoso, a professor of journalism at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, covers climate change and climate policy for Mongabay; this is his sixth UN climate summit. Follow him on Twitter @jcatanosoBanner image caption: Laura Vargas of the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative Peru. Image by Justin Catanoso.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Activism, Adaptation To Climate Change, Climate, Climate Activism, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Change Negotiations, Climate Change Policy, Climate Change Politics, Climate Justice, climate policy, Climate Politics, Conservation and Religion, Controversial, Emission Reduction, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forest Carbon, Forests, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Law, Pollution, Religions, United Nations last_img read more

Posted in xyybvouo

first_imgBy Hub City Times staffMARSHFIELD – The Marshfield High School gymnastics team set a new school record at its home quadrangular meet against Arcadia, Tomah, & Westby, on Jan. 24 at Marshfield High School.The Tigers scored a total of 138.450 to break their own record and take first, with Arcadia following at 109.7 for second.Gracie Holland took first in all around competition, by placing first in uneven bars, balance beam, and floor exercise and third in vaulting. Emma Haugen followed in second place, with a first in vaulting and second place finishes in uneven bars, balance beam, and floor exerciselast_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgBrand South Africa congratulates and commends the team for their commitment and discipline. The victory over Nigeria, the number-one ranked side in Africa, shows that we too can be world-beaters. This achievement increases the sense of national excitement and support for South Africa’s athletes and the win by Banyana Banyana embodies the talent and spirit of South Africa.“As a nation we look forward to further victories and feel that our team will continue to make us proud. Sport has always been one of the great unifiers of our country – it inspires us to achieve in new ways and shows that we too can be world-beaters,” says Miller Matola, Brand South Africa CEO.Bafana Bafana will face Cape Verde in the opening match at Soccer City on January 19, 2013. “We know our other national soccer teams, especially Bafana Bafana, will be inspired by the Banyana’s powerful performance when they take on Cape Verde, Morocco and Angola in their Group A encounters of the Afcon”, adds Matola.Note to EditorsBrand South Africa, previously known as the International Marketing Council of South Africa, officially changed its name to best align with its mandate of building South Africa’s nation brand reputation in order to improve its global competitiveness.last_img read more

Posted in svmkhfch

first_imgThis is 1/10 System Defense policy tests I worked on. This test has four systems: three servers & one AMT 3.0 client. I run pings from each server to the vPro and from the vPro (via RDP session) to each server. Then I block all IP except from one server. I lose connectivity including the RDP session but can still manage the system to remove the policy. last_img

Posted in njlmtazq

first_imgWant to surprise your audience into paying attention? Here is a great example.Suppose you’re trying to sell milk in a way that is cooler than those mustaches, which are getting old. How about irony? How about shades of Spinal Tap and a retro young ironic hip cool vibe?How about… putting milk inside a guitar? In the hands of a musical phenom by the name of White Gold?Talk about zigging instead of zagging… You’ve got to love this Got Milk? campaign for California.last_img

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