first_img Related Posts Lab Diagnostics News Radiology Read Article The technology will ensure faster and accurate diagnosis, thereby improving the quality of life of patientsHCG introduced US FDA approved digital pathology solution by Philips Intellisite Pathology Solutions across all its centres in India. This technology marks a step forward in cancer treatment through precision, speed, efficiency and ease of use with immense potential to provide significant clinical benefits to both the physicians and patients.With the advent of digitisation, anatomic pathology is undergoing an important change to keep pace with growing demands in precision medicine. Digital pathology has revolutionised the field of histopathology, by the technology of converting the entire glass slide to a digital image which can then be acquired, viewed on a medical grade monitor, annotated, archived, shared and networked across the globe.Speaking at the launch, Dr BS Ajaikumar, Chairman, CEO, HCG said, “Pathological diagnosis is one of the most important steps in oncology and at HCG, we have always believed in organ-specific pathologists reviewing the samples. With digital pathology, the way the samples are presented and its magnification are infinitely better than the human eye reviewing them. The best advantage however, is that several people can review the slides at the same time, in separate geographies, to arrive at the best conclusion that would benefit the patient. For instance, in countries like India and Africa, where it may be difficult for patients to get expertise, digital pathology will bridge that gap. This is surely a path breaking concept and in the future, this will prove to be a paradigm shift in the way we treat patients.”Also present at the conference, Dr Veena R, Consultant Pathologist, Head, Histopathologist, Strand Life Sciences, Bangalore said, “In this era of precision oncology, there is a need for quantitative diagnosis than just qualitative descriptive diagnosis. Integration of all relevant patient records including imaging and genomics data is the need of the hour, which is certainly not possible with analogue workflow. With Digital Pathology, we have access to all patient information at the click of a button which allows us to compare and collaborate with physicians and experts all around the country and beyond. Furthermore, it allows trained sub specialists to work on specific cases rather than taking a generalised approach. Right case to the right specialist at the right time is an important decision to not only save on the cost of wrong treatment but also to protect the patient from adverse effects of therapy.”Digitisation of pathology services will result in improved accuracy of reports through physician and pathologist collaboration across the network ensuring faster turnaround time for patients and clinicians. Further, integration with clinical data, imaging data and genomics data will ensure that treatment protocols are tailor-made for each patient.With the introduction of digital pathological services, HCG has moved further in revolutionising cancer treatment, making it possible to focus on improved outcomes for patients. Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Share Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” cancer treatmentDigitisationHCGpathologyPhilips Intellisite Pathology SolutionsUS FDA HCG introduces US FDA approved digital pathology solution By EH News Bureau on April 29, 2019 MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Comments (0) Add Commentlast_img read more

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first_imgKOBE – Shun Kubo will face Venezuelan champion Nehomar Cermeno for the WBA super bantamweight world title, his Shinsei Gym announced on Friday.The 26-year-old Kubo, ranked ninth, will be taking his first shot at a world title at Osaka’s Edion Arena on April 9. Shinsei Gym, Shun Kubo, Nehomar Cermeno, WBA super bantamweight title RELATED PHOTOS KEYWORDS “I have to go into the bout with the same mental approach as always and just try and win,” Kubo told a news conference in Kobe.Kubo, who retained his Oriental-Pacific title in November, is unbeaten in 11 bouts. The 37-year-old Cermeno has a record of 26-5-1 (15 KOs).Hopes are being pinned on Kubo following in the footsteps of stablemate Hozumi Hasegawa, a former world champion in three different weight divisions who retired in December.Hoping to respond to expectations with a win, Kubo said, “I have been given all kinds of advice.” center_img Shun Kubo | KYODO GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMES IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5last_img read more

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first_imgPlanet image of fires in the Amazon on August 22, 2019 at GPS point -6.35, -53. Planet image of fires in the Amazon at GPS point -10.61, -57.84. Planet image of fires in the Amazon at GPS point -9.61, -64.08. Planet image of fires in the Amazon at GPS point -9.5, -64.41. While many of the images currently being shared on social media and by news outlets are from past fires, satellites can provide a near real-time view of what’s unfolding in the Amazon.With near-daily overflights and high-resolution imagery, Planet’s constellation of satellites is providing a clear look at some of the fires now burning in the Brazilian Amazon.Beyond dramatic snapshots, those images also provide data that can be mined for critical insights on what’s happening in the Amazon on a basin-wide scale. High-resolution images from satellite company Planet are revealing glimpses of some of the fires currently devastating the Amazon rainforest.While many of the images currently being shared on social media and by news outlets are from past fires — some from as long as 15 years ago — satellites can provide a near real-time view of what’s unfolding in the Amazon. With near-daily overflights and high-resolution imagery, Planet’s constellation of satellites is providing a clear look at some of the fires now burning in the Brazilian Amazon.Fires burning on the margins of forest and cleared agricultural areas in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso on Aug. 20, 2019. Image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc.Beyond dramatic snapshots, those images also provide data that can be mined for critical insights into what’s happening in the Amazon on a basin-wide scale, according to Greg Asner, the director of the Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science at Arizona State University, whose team is using Planet’s data to assess the impact of the fires on carbon emissions.“Planet data provides unprecedented detail in mapping forest change down to individual trees which allows us to assess the damage from these kinds of large scale disturbances,” Asner told Mongabay. “Our Planet Incubator Program is currently tracking forest carbon emissions all over the world — including the Amazon — using Planet Dove and SkySat imagery.“If you took all of the carbon stored in every tropical forest on Earth and burned it up, you would emit about five times the carbon dioxide into the atmosphere that is already there. The Amazon rainforest represents about half of this forest carbon to give you an idea of how serious this current situation is and the kind of impact it will have on climate change.”Fires burning in the state of Pará, Brazil, on Aug. 20, 2019. Image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc.This Planet image shows a fire burning in an area of recent forest clearing in Mato Grosso, Brazil. The utility of Planet’s data has spurred speculation that its constellation could be used by the Brazilian government to replace INPE’s deforestation monitoring system. But Planet has denied negotiating with the Brazilian government on such a plan. Image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc.Planet wouldn’t comment what the images show specifically, but there are strong indications from other sources that many fires are burning near areas of recent deforestation. Analysis released this week by IPAM Amazônia, a Brazilian research group, shows that the 10 Amazonian municipalities that had the most fire outbreaks this year were also the ones that had the highest deforestation rates.“These municipalities are responsible for 37 percent of the hotbeds in 2019 and 43 percent of recorded deforestation through July,” states the IPAM report. “This concentration of forest fires in newly deforested areas with mild drought represent a strong indication of the intentional character of the fires.”In other words, fires are being set to clear lands for agriculture, most likely cattle pasture, which accounts for 70 to 80 percent of forest conversion in the Brazilian Amazon. Typically a landowner will cut and harvest valuable timber trees before slashing and burning the remaining trees. The resulting ash provides a temporary source of nutrients for pasture grass, but the soil degrades quickly without careful management.Planet images showing Nova Bandeirantes in Mato Grosso before and after a fire on Aug. 21, 2019. Images courtesy of Planet Labs Inc.While old-growth Amazon rainforest doesn’t typically burn naturally outside droughts and El Niño years, fires set intentionally in degraded forests and agricultural lands can burn hot enough to spread deep into otherwise untouched forests. That seems to be what’s happening this year, which, as IPAM noted, isn’t especially dry.However that may soon change — for the worse.With climate models forecasting a much hotter Amazon due to rising carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere, a growing chorus of scientists are warning that the combination of continued deforestation and climate change could tip the wet Amazon rainforest toward a much drier, savanna-like ecosystem. Since the trees of the Amazon generate much of region’s precipitation, such a shift could be devastating for the region’s water supplies. The agricultural heartland of South America is predicted to be particularly hard hit by water scarcity, but diminished rainfall would also affect cities’ electricity supplies, which are disproportionately dependent on hydropower. Drier conditions would exacerbate fire and air pollution risk as well.Fire map showing active fires for the week starting Aug. 13, 2019, in the Brazilian Amazon using VIIRS and MODIS satellite data. Image courtesy of Global Forest Watch (GFW).Fires and deforestation up in 2019Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon has been trending upward since bottoming out in 2012 at 4,571 square kilometers (1,765 square miles), but the issue didn’t get a lot of public attention until this week, when the skies of São Paulo, one the world’s largest cities, were blackened midday by smoke from the fires. The shocking descent into darkness prompted an outpouring of concern across social media, with the #PrayforAmazonas hashtag garnering more than 300,000 tweets in two days.But while the fires in the Amazon have indeed increased significantly over last year, they aren’t off the charts relative to the past 20 years.MODIS fire data presented by Global Forest Watch.The difference this year is that weather conditions led the smoke from the fires to blanket densely populated urban areas. A similar phenomenon is seen in Southeast Asia: Indonesia’s peat fires get the most attention when winds blow the resulting haze over Singapore, the regional financial hub, as was the case in 2015.However, to environmentalists worried about the anti-environment rhetoric from President Jair Bolsonaro, the Armageddon-like conditions in São Paulo and sharp rise in deforestation seem be playing out like a worst-case scenario for the Amazon.According to the country’s national space research institute, INPE, forest loss in the world’s largest rainforest is already pacing 57 percent ahead of last year. And the region is only halfway through the peak deforestation season that runs from May to October. Data from Imazon, a Brazilian NGO that independently tracks deforestation in the Amazon, is expected to confirm the trend when it releases the latest numbers next week.Monthly deforestation alerts and long-term deforestation data in the Brazilian Amazon, last updated August 23, 2019. Line chart labeled ‘TTM avg’ reflects the moving average over the previous 12 months. Data aggregated from INPE and Imazon. Background photo by Rhett A. Butler.Stung by criticism over rising deforestation, Bolsonaro has asserted INPE is manipulating deforestation data and fired the agency’s director. INPE has not released any deforestation updates since the firing. Bolsonaro also claimed, without evidence, that NGOs are responsible for starting the fires as a fundraising strategy, although he backtracked on those remarks today.Bolsonaro, however, hasn’t been able to effectively refute the satellite data coming from places like Planet and NASA. Scientists and civil society groups are now poring over that data to look for links between Bolsonaro’s policies — including weakened environmental laws, relaxed law enforcement, and amnesty for illegal deforesters — and what’s happening on the ground in the Amazon.“While links between Brazilian government policy and these wildfires are unknown, the unprecedented data coming from Planet will allow us to help evaluate the extent to which their policies need to be reexamined,” Asner said.Slideshow: These Planet images of fires in the Amazon were taken Aug. 21, 2019, and processed by the Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science at ASU. Images courtesy of Planet Lab Inc. and CGDCS. Planet image of fires in the Amazon at GPS point -6.69, -55.14. Planet image of fires in the Amazon at GPS point -6.59, -55.04. Article published by Rhett Butler Planet image of fires in the Amazon at GPS point -6.35, -53.55. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Planet image of fires in the Amazon at GPS point -10.04, -62.51. Planet image of fires in the Amazon at GPS point -9.55, -63.75. Climate Change, Conservation Technology, Deforestation, Environment, Featured, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Technology, Technology And Conservation, Tropical Forests, wildfires, Wildtech 12345678910 read more

Posted in fmdcodne

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A mostly nocturnal species found in freshwater habitats in Mexico and South America, the electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) belongs to the knifefish family and is more closely related to catfish and carp than other eels. It was first described more than 250 years ago by Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus.But now a team of scientists led by Carlos David de Santana, an associate researcher at the US Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, has determined that E. electricus is in fact three distinct species.During their work in the field, the researchers used a voltmeter to record a member of one of the newly described species, E. voltai, discharging 860 volts, the highest discharge ever recorded for any animal (the previous record was 650 volts). There are now three recognized species of electric eel after two new species were described to science in a paper published in Nature Communications this week.One of the new eel species is capable of generating a shock of as much as 860 volts, the most powerful electrical discharge ever discovered in any known animal.A mostly nocturnal species found in freshwater habitats in Mexico and South America, the electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) belongs to the knifefish family and is more closely related to catfish and carp than other eels. It was first described more than 250 years ago by Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus. But now a team of scientists led by Carlos David de Santana, an associate researcher at the US Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, has determined that E. electricus is in fact three distinct species.De Santana and team collected 107 electric eel specimens from different parts of the Amazon in Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana, and Suriname. They then analyzed the specimens’ mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, morphology, ecological data, and voltage discharge to conclude that the eels actually represented three different species.David Santana looking for electric fish in the National Forest, Amapá. Photo Credit: E. Kuano.“Their body shape is highly conserved. It has not changed much during 10 million years of evolution,” Santana said in a statement. “Only a few details of their external morphology distinguish them, and only an integrated analysis of morphology, genetics and ecology was able to make robust distinctions between the species.”During their work in the field, the researchers used a voltmeter to record a member of one of the newly described species, E. voltai, discharging 860 volts, the highest discharge ever recorded (the previous record was 650 volts). Differences in electrical discharge was a key factor in determining that there were two heretofore unrecognized species of electric eel. “We used voltage as the key differentiation criterion,” said Naércio Menezes, a professor at Brazil’s University of São Paulo and principal investigator of the Thematic Project, of which the present study was a part. “This has never been done before to identify a new species.”E. electricus is now considered to be the species of electric eel that lives in an area of the northern Amazon known as the Guiana Shield, which encompasses the northern parts of the Brazilian states of Amapá, Amazonas, and Roraima as well as Guyana, French Guiana, and Suriname.E. voltai, named after Italian physicist and inventor of the electric battery Alessandro Volta, can be found in the Brazilian Shield, which stretches across parts of the Brazilian states of Pará, Amazonas, Rondônia, and Mato Grosso. Smaller amounts of dissolved salts make the region’s water less electrically conductive, leading the researchers to theorize that E. voltai responded by developing the ability to produce stronger electrical discharges in order to stun prey and ward off predators.E. voltai in the Xingu river. An article published in Nature Communications shows that three species of electric eel exist, not just one as previously described, and that one of them produces an electric shock up to 860 volts. The researchers were funded by FAPESP, the Smithsonian and National Geographic. Photo Credit: L. Souza.The other newly described species, E. varii, was named for zoologist Richard P. Vari, a researcher at the Smithsonian who passed away in 2016. “He was the foreign researcher who most influenced and helped Brazilian students and researchers with the study of fish in South America,” Santana said.E. varii can be found in the lowland Amazon Basin, where it inhabits turbid rivers with a relatively large amount of dissolved salts. Since this increases the conductivity of the water, the discharges of E. varii don’t need to be as powerful, and indeed they range from just 151 to 572 volts.Until 2016, reports of electric eels leaping out of the water to shock would-be predators were considered apocryphal. But Kenneth Catania, a scientist at Vanderbilt University in the US, proved that they do in fact leap out of the water in order to press their chins directly against a target and deliver what he calls their “high-voltage volleys.” You can even watch video of an electric eel attack that Catania made during his study.Santana and team believe that the species diverged twice: first in the Miocene, approximately 7.1 million years ago, when they separated from their common ancestor; and again in the Pliocene, about 3.6 million years ago, when the species we now know as E. voltai and E. electricus emerged.“The discovery of new electric eel species in Amazonia, one of the planet’s biodiversity hotspots, is suggestive of the vast amount of species that remain to be discovered in nature,” Santana said. “Furthermore, the region is of great interest to other scientific fields, such as medicine and biotechnology, reinforcing the need to protect and conserve it, and is important for studies involving partnerships among Brazilian researchers, and between us and groups in other countries, to explore the region’s biodiversity.”An electric eel. Photo by Sharon Mollerus, licensed under CC BY 2.0.CITATION• Santana et al. (2019). Unexpected species diversity in electric eels with a description of the strongest living bioelectricity generator. Nature Communications. doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11690-zFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Amazon, Amazon Biodiversity, Animals, Environment, Fish, Freshwater Fish, New Species, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife last_img read more

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first_imgThe wireless antennas contain small radios that mesh into a network that communicates with the Internet. Cities would be charged a rate for leasing space on the poles. If the plan is approved, anyone with a wireless-capable laptop or other Wi-Fi devices could surf the Web from city parks or other spots around town. Since Santa Clarita first explored Wi-Fi about 11/2 years ago the vendors’ business model – which included revenue from banner ads – has changed. The service might be free in parts of town, while in other areas a fee might be charged. Public access could be an option for people who can’t afford home-based cable Internet or high-speed lines such as DSL, because it might be offered free or at reduced cost. [email protected] (661) 257-5255 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SANTA CLARITA – The days of patronizing certain food or coffee joints to tap a wireless Internet feed may soon be past, with citywide access on the horizon. Southern California Edison recently sought state regulators’ approval to let cities mount wireless antennas on the utility’s light poles. Cities seeking the service are relieved some action’s been taken, but complain about how long it took. “We’ve been prevailing on Edison for two years, and there are very few private industries that could have hung on that long for a decision to move forward on something,” said Ken Desforges, director of information systems for the city of Diamond Bar, which has been in the forefront of the push. After determining hookups were safe and wouldn’t disrupt service, Edison filed a plan on May 23 with the state Public Utilities Commission. The public comment period is under way and if no opposition is lodged, the tariff could be approved within 90 days. last_img read more

Posted in gtzriikh

first_imgBy 1997 he was a full-time ICC umpire, and in 2002 he was elected to the ICC’s Elite Panel. He has umpired in three World Cups: in 1999, 2003, and 2007. Continuing, he added: “It has been exciting 17 years in the business, one that many would envy, I”m sure. Every job has highs and lows and umpiring is no exception. On Saturday, 11 July, Koertzen reached the 200 one-day international (ODI) milestone when he stood in the second ODI between Ireland and Kenya in Dublin. To mark the occasion, Koertzen received a trophy from Cricket Ireland President Arthur Vince on behalf of the International Cricket Council (ICC). He made his debut over 16 years earlier in a match between South Africa and India in Port Elizabeth on 9 December 1992. His first test match took place later that month, also in Port Elizabeth, with South Africa and India once more the two teams in action. Koertzen, now 60, was 43 years of age at the time. Reflecting on his achievement of becoming the first man to umpire 200 one-day internationals on the Cricket South Africa website, Koertzen said: “For someone who started umpiring very late in life, it is a huge personal achievement and a dream come true. It is really a great and satisfying feeling to achieve something as massive as this one. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Highly respected around the world, Koertzen is known for his deliberate and slow raising of the finger when giving batsmen out. Never does his finger shoot up. It has become his trademark and is commonly referred to as the “slow death”. Looking back on the evolution of the game during his time as an international umpire, Koertze said: “While the sport has changed, so have the Laws over the years, I think for the better for the game. I think cricket of today is far more entertaining, challenging, demanding and competitive for the players, organisers and spectators than it was few years ago. South African cricket umpire Rudi Koertzen has enjoyed a long and successful career. His longevity in the sport has helped him to a number of records; recently he became the first umpire to stand in 200 one-day internationals. He also became the second man to do the double of 100 one-day internationals and 100 tests when he took to the field in the second Ashes test at Lords on Thursday. ‘A privilege’“Umpiring provided me the opportunity to travel country to country, meet amazing people, understand different cultures, but most importantly it was a privilege to see young talent of yesterday become stalwarts of today.” 16 July 2009 “All in all, it has been a very rewarding and a fascinating journey, something that I should be proud of,” he concluded. ‘Passion and hard work’ICC President David Morgan paid tribute to Koertzen, saying: “Rudi’s achievement is by no means a small one and is a result of his tremendous dedication, commitment and fitness. Umpiring is something he wanted to do and his achievements reflect that he has done it with passion and hard work. “It’s a matter of great honour for the ICC itself that one of its umpires has reached this landmark. On behalf of the ICC, I would like to congratulate Rudi for serving our great game through his umpiring and being a role model and inspiration for many young up and coming umpires.” A model professionalKoertzen is a model professional – keeps fit with regular gym visits and employs modern technology to help refine his game by studying batsmen, their techniques, and their previous dismissals on television.last_img read more

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first_imgD’Sa fights tirelessly to defend the rights of the poor, who are worst affected by environmental injustices. And for this he received the Goldman Environmental Prize for Outstanding Environmental Achievement in Africa on 28 April, in the United States. (Image: Goldman Prize)• Goldman Environmental Foundation001 [email protected] Jane CookA passionate and outspoken activist from Durban has won the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize. Desmond D’Sa, an environmental hero with an unfailing commitment to environmental justice and environmental rights for all, has changed his entire community. Despite fire bombings and attempted shady business deal buy-outs, he stands firmly by his desire for justice and equality.D’Sa fights tirelessly to defend the rights of the poor, who are worst affected by environmental injustices. And for this he received the Goldman Environmental Prize for Outstanding Environmental Achievement in Africa on 28 April, in the United States.The beginningForcibly removed by the apartheid government from their home, the D’Sa family was resettled in South Durban, an area with no parks but plenty of large oil refineries, chemical tank farms and paper mills. The young D’Sa quickly realised that corporate pollution was killing people; seeing his neighbours and family members suffer dreadful ailments he realised that something had to change drastically.His first impression of South Durban was shocking, he says. “To see so many smoke chimneys and factories located alongside residential housing and kids playing in the plumes of the pollution. In this urban jungle there were no clean running rivers, no vegetable gardens and only red soil. As the years went by, there was a rapid increase in industry and petrochemical expansion.“This made me realise we were deliberately placed to live alongside dirty industries and our lungs played the role of purifiers for pollution from these factories.”Regular visits of the government ambulances became more frequent – and they would come with nebulisers and oxygen cylinders to ensure that people, especially children, were able to breathe properly. It got worse, and D’Sa and his friends were unable to play outside, driven indoors by the rank air from the factories. Crops could not be grown, and people had to buy all their fruit and vegetables, taking a further financial toll on the poor community.D’Sa vowed to change the life of his community. In 1990, he co-founded the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDCEA), which unites a diverse group of South Africans with an ultimate goal of environmental justice for all. By 1996, he was tirelessly campaigning against toxic waste dumping in South Durban, a poor but highly industrialised area.Closing down dumpsA California non-profit group called Global Community Monitor partnered with local residents and D’Sa to expose the detrimental reality of the air pollution and the illnesses that were abundant in the area. A “bucket brigade” of residents collected samples of air, which were then sent to the US where they were analysed. They showed high levels of benzene, a confirmed carcinogen, and several health studies found incidence of asthma in 52% of the children and a quantified cancer risk at 25 in 100 000 people, compared with the norm of 1 in 100 000.“When we got the results back, we developed a flow chart of all the different smells and odours so that people could be better educated about the chemical odours and the impact they would have on health,” says D’Sa.After relentless campaigning, the dump was closed. But as a result of his passion, in 2011 his home was firebombed. Speaking to the Washington Post, he said: “We face dangers all the time because we stand up for justice and truth and for people who can’t speak for themselves. But that will not deter me from doing what’s right. I’m not going to be afraid.“The attack resulted in me and my daughter being rushed to hospital. I endured facial injuries and burns to my arms as well as respiratory difficulties. The attack changed me in a way where I became stronger, more confident to speak the truth and not be afraid as I knew that I was doing the right thing.”About his choice as winner, David Gordon, the executive director of the Goldman prize, said: “He really stood out for his passionate activism and the way he’s organised his community to achieve a really important victory.” The Goldman award highlights the SDCEA’s 2011 struggle and victory in getting Wasteman Holding’s Bulbul Drive toxic landfill site, which was exposing residents to dangerous chemicals, shut down.The toxic dumpSouth Durban is home to almost 70% of South Africa’s industry, including more than 300 oil and gas refineries, paper mills, agrochemical plants and hazardous waste landfills such as the Bulbul Drive dump. For more than two decades, Wasteman Holdings, a South African waste management company, dumped toxic waste from shipyards, factory farms, medical facilities, and oil and chemical factories in the Bulbul Drive landfill, contaminating soil, water and air. The community spent nearly 15 years fighting it, and turned an application for expansion in 2009 to a closure in 2011.Still, the shutdown is just the first step. The landfill’s leachate – the liquid that runs off the waste – is so toxic that other disposal sites won’t take it. The government has instructed Wasteman to build an onsite plant, to pretreat it before shipping it elsewhere.Paying tribute to South Durban residents, D’Sa says: “The closing of the Bulbul Drive landfill is a remarkable triumph and a deserving victory for the hundreds of tenacious and brave residents who campaigned tirelessly for years to close down the landfill.”And he is over the moon at being awarded “the Nobel Prize for grassroots environmentalism”.Environmental allianceThe SDCEA embraces a holistic approach, with an ideal of achieving environmental justice for all. It focuses on water and land issues, basic human rights, all types of pollution, and resisting toxic industrial expansion, development and infrastructure projects that seek to destroy the community. The group challenges policy and legislation, builds education and awareness, and community empowerment.Guardian of EarthD’Sa seeks out environmental justice, explaining: “This is about equity and justice as well as basic human rights while living in harmony with nature and other species. It is about those with power – the politicians as well as the corporations – abusing the poor.“Today in South Africa I see the increase of injustices and inequality towards people and the environment and the way in which we all interact with the built environment as well. What is noticeable to me is the destruction of our social systems, ecosystems, flora and fauna as well as many other aspects of the world we live in. As a result of this inequality – together with Brazil, South Africa is the most unequal country in the world, where the gap between the richest and poorest is the greatest – the level of poverty is rising, and there is a general lack of access to basic needs such as water, energy, housing and proper sanitation.”With the increase in industry and toxic emissions, he says, the level of health concerns escalated to an extent that the community realised they needed to take a stand and fight for their rights to an environment that was not harmful to their health and well-being. “For me it was more than just a stand; it was to bring to the attention of all community members, [the] government, and huge corporations that corporate polluting activities – condoned by [the] government – are killing us, the residents of South Durban, daily.”Current challengesStill fearlessly fighting, D’Sa has great plans in the pipeline. He is contending a proposal to expand the port of Durban that would shift and misplace thousands of South Durban residents and exacerbate waste, pollution and traffic in the neighbourhood.“[The government] wants to develop a dug-out port which will result in some of us losing our homes. We are losing our social fabric and our urban neighbourhoods are changing from residential to peripheral industrial wastelands,” he explains.The major infrastructure development of the dug-out port will be backed by the Infrastructure Development legislation which basically gives the government the right to do as it pleases, for the “good of the nation” and elite corporate wealth. This is the SDCEA’s focus over the near future.“[The expansion] will cause the biggest social upheaval since apartheid. We already suffered enough trauma under apartheid; we lost our lands, our houses, our communities. We don’t want to go through that again,” says D’Sa, who has vowed to fight the plan at every step.It was a foreboding echo of history, said Global Community Monitor executive director Denny Larson, “as corporate and other forces legally and forcibly evict people from land where they’ve been living for a long time. It would be the largest removal of residents – many subsistence fisher folk – since apartheid.”Listen to Desmond D’Sa hereGoldman Environmental AwardEstablished in 1989 by late San Francisco civic leaders and philanthropists Richard and Rhoda Goldman, the Goldman Environmental Prize annually honours grassroots women and men from inner cities or remote villages who make significant efforts to protect and enhance the natural environment, often taking personal risks.The winners receive $175 000 (about R1.8-million) and a bronze sculpture called the Ouroboros that depicts a serpent biting its tail, a symbol of nature’s power of renewal in many cultures.There are two ceremonies: first, in San Francisco at the War Memorial Opera House. Over 3 000 people attend the always packed, emotion-filled event. Later that week, prize recipients attend the second ceremony in Washington DC. At the ceremonies, short documentary films provide an introduction to the recipients and their accomplishments.Other winnersOther winners this year include the Indonesian biologist Rudi Putra, who dismantled illegal palm oil plantations causing deforestation; Russian zoologist Suren Gazaryan, who exposed government corruption and the illegal use of federally protected forestland along Russia’s Black Sea coast; Ruth Buendia from Peru, who stood up to dam construction that would have uprooted indigenous people; the American attorney Helen Slottje, who provided pro-bono legal assistance to defend many towns targeted by gas drilling operations; and Ramesh Agrawal from India who, from his small internet café, began a successful campaign to stop a huge coal mining project in an area already affected by pollution.last_img read more

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first_imgMarimba! Marimba! MARIIIIIMBAAAAAAAA!  My phone kept ringing wildly as I approached the movie theater this past Thanksgiving.  As many of you have guessed by now, I love the movies and I was on my way to see Horrible Bosses 2 (horrendous, I know) when I was taken down a different road by my cousin back in Miami.  I answered and he uttered, “You won’t believe the story I have for you. This is absolute MADNESS!”  Before I could get him to take a breath, he said, “It’s a holiday and our plans for the day have been ruined by my wife’s boss who turned up completely unannounced to go over financials for the Board meeting.  We were going to have a family day with our kids and now he is here and won’t leave.   The best part is Maria won’t ask him to leave.  He is screwing with our lives.  I can’t believe this %$^!”  Naturally, I was completely derailed in my attempt to see a movie despite the fact that I had already found my seat, ordered a large Coke Zero, and poured my peanut M&M’s into a mega-sized tub of buttered popcorn (#moreexerciseneeded).  I cursed the movie gods and put the popcorn and soda aside.  I stepped out and proceeded to dive in.  I had to be a good friend and figure out what was going. After a few hours of conversation and one fake emergency phone call later, Maria’s boss was gone and Ramon was spending the night at his dad’s place because he needed some time to cool off.  Over the course of the evening, I had the opportunity to delve deeper.  Maria’s boss is a micromanager of the worst kind.  He does not believe in letting people produce work.  He refuses to accept that his team can generate quality work without his looking over their collective shoulders.  But this is an illness for him.  He will interrupt any part of life to ensure work is being done. He once interrupted a baptism to check on the status of the godmother’s revenue reports.  He is so obsessed with micromanagement that he insists on using a hall pass system for breaks to ensure high-performing accountants are at their desks.  He is so far gone on the scale of micromanagement that no reasonable job candidate would ever join the team.  Yes, he is succeeding at driving away top talent.   Ramon was right.  This was absolute madness.The funny thing is Ramon and Maria asked me for my advice.  My initial reaction was talk to your boss.  He is creating disengagement.  He is crossing so many lines that you’d have to wonder if he was boundary blind.  But as I explored the topic even further I realized this was not going to work if Maria had to have the conversation.  She needed a coach.  She needed someone who could teach her how to advocate.  She needed someone who would take the reins and lower the boom on her boss.  The right answer was HR.  She needed HR to do the good, the bad, and the ugly of coaching to ensure both employees had this issue resolved in an effective manner.  I turned to my trusted HR advisors (a collection of senior HR professionals from around the globe) and asked them for their thoughts.  Their responses could be culled into the following themes:1)      The Good—this is a growth opportunity for everyone involved.  The HR professional will learn how to handle a difficult situation if they don’t already know how.  Maria and her boss will need coaching on how to communicate and, more importantly, how to listen.  The key is ensuring all parties involved recognize resolution is needed.2)      The Bad—this is going to result in at least one party leaving the organization.  The HR professional will coach both parties and offer guidance about person-job fit.  Most likely, Maria will choose to leave because her boss is too entrenched within the organization and her boss will have to start over.  The key is ensuring lessons are learned and the best decision for Maria’s employment is made.3)      The Ugly—this cannot be reconciled without termination of Maria’s boss.  The HR professional will coach both parties but, ultimately, Maria’s boss will not change.  The only way forward is to terminate Maria’s boss which will only get ugly for Maria because she will be recognized as the person who complained about the behavior.  Maria’s boss will never achieve tangible growth because the opportunity to grow was taken away.  The key is ensuring that Maria takes coaching about how this can affect her within the organization and Maria’s boss takes coaching to a future employer.Each of these themes highlights a perspective built upon coaching.  For each theme Maria was asked to grow and her boss was expected to grow.  The funny thing is this situation demonstrates two key competencies exhibited by HR professionals every day—creativity in consultation and courage in navigating the organization.  I just don’t know how any HR professional could function effectively without proficiency in these competencies. Whether you are driven toward the good, the bad, or the ugly, you have to pour your creativity into coaching and your courage into handling the tough situation.  That’s what makes HR the frontline for coaching the un-coachable.  Coach’em up and take no prisoners!Have you ever had this type of situation?  How did you handle it?  How would you handle this if it happened to you?  How would you flex your creatively courageous competency-based muscles?last_img read more

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first_imgMessi scored a hat-trick against APOEL to become Champions League’s all-time top scorer.Lionel Messi made a slice of European football history as the Barcelona striker hit a hat-trick to become the Champions League’s all-time top scorer in a 4-0 win over APOEL on Tuesday.Three days after breaking a Spanish league record that had stood since 1955, Messi was again unstoppable.”Messi is the best player of all time … a player who will continue to surprise us for a long time to come,” Barcelona coach Luis Enrique said. The Argentine scored his first goal in the 38th minute of the Group F match after redirecting Brazilian midfielder Rafihna’s shot from 20 yards out.It was Messi’s 72nd Champions League goal, beating the previous mark of 71 by former Real Madrid and Schalke striker Raul. Messi scored again in the 58th after getting on the end of Daniel Alves’ through ball to chip past APOEL goalkeeper Urko Pardo.His third – and 74th overall came three minutes before the end of regulation time when he tapped the ball home from point blank range after Pedro Rodriguez cut the ball back. Uruguay’s Luis Suarez scored Barcelona’s other goal in the 27th when he eluded his marker with a clever pivot and curled the ball into the far corner for his first competitive goal for Barcelona.Barcelona had kept APOEL on the back foot throughout the match. Messi produced Barcelona’s first good scoring chance just three minutes after the start when he latched onto a through pass and blasted a shot but APOEL goalkeeper Urko Parko was able to parry the ball.advertisementA couple of minutes before halftime, Suarez just missed with a well-struck shot 20 yards (meters) out. Barcelona again dominated after the interval. A backpass by Messi in the 73rd found a charging Suarez alone in the box, but Pardo did well to save the Uruguyan’s low, hard shot.APOEL’s best chance came in the 66nd on a counterattack after Argentinian forward Tomas De Vincenti’s shot from inside the box tested Barcelona goalkeeper Marc-Andre ter Stegen. Barcelona were reduced to 10 players in the 70th when Rafinha was sent off for a second booking after a foul on De Vincenti. APOEL also finished the match with 10 players after defender Joao Guilherme was dismissed with a second yellow card.APOEL coach George Donis wasn’t surprised by the result.”I consider this natural when facing a team like Barcelona to lose by such a wide margin,” he said.last_img read more

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