first_imgStephanie Lindquist-Johnson and her son, Phillip Johnson, are building cat shelters out of styrofoam coolers.It’s been a particularly long and harsh winter. Intermittent snowstorms mixed with the occasional warm bout of weather have weighed on Stephanie Lindquist-Johnson’s mind. That’s why the Roeland Park resident has been busy all winter building shelters for feral and outdoor cats around the Kansas City metro area.“Every year, I always worry; I feel so sorry for the animals out in the cold. They don’t have anywhere to go,” Lindquist-Johnson said. “So it’s important now to make these just because I know there are so many that don’t have shelter.”The shelters are made from styrofoam coolers. Lindquist-Johnson cuts a cat-sized hole into each one, places cardboard and straw at the bottom, wraps the cooler in black plastic (to keep the elements out and also to conceal the shelter) and tapes it with sturdy black tape. She also adds additional padding to the bottom of some of the coolers to get them off the ground.“It’s very durable; it will last a really long time,” she said.She first got the idea in October from Sandy Siecgrist, a local resident who stays connected on animal rescue Facebook pages. Siecgrist had given her a makeshift shelter for a feral cat, inspiring her to start making as many shelters as possible and distributing them where needed.Then in November 2018, Lindquist-Johnson posted on Nextdoor, a social networking application connecting neighbors, about her plans and the need for materials.“I knew the holidays were coming up, and a lot of people have these (coolers) in their garage just laying around; they just don’t want to throw them away,” she said.After the media attention she garnered earlier this year from an article in the Kansas City Star, the donations have been pouring in. Lindquist-Johnson said she is grateful for the donations from local residents, organizations and businesses who have provided her with dozens of coolers, plenty of materials and $580 in monetary donations. Her husband, Shane Johnson, has provided materials as well.How to make a cat shelterEach cat shelter is made with a styrofoam cooler, black plastic and black tape, plus bedding made with cardboard and straw.Each one takes less than an hour to make. Their 5-year-old son, Phillip Johnson, also helps make the shelters. So far, they have made 54 cooler-shelters and distributed almost all of them out into the community. They will continue making the cooler shelters throughout the winter. The best kind of shelters are about a foot to a foot-and-a-half in length, but she even takes large coolers and cuts them in half to make two smaller cat homes.“You want them fairly small so the cat’s body heat heats up inside,” she said. “If they have a lot of space, it’s going to be harder to keep warm.”Lindquist-Johnson said they hope to continue connecting the needs of stray cats with resources from people who want to help.“A lot of people worry and they just don’t know what to do,” she said, adding that people have reached out to her on Nextdoor and Facebook requesting a shelter for a stray or feral cat. “That makes me feel good. People do care; they want to help. Maybe they just don’t have the tools, supplies or resources to get it done.“This is our passion; we love to do this and it makes us feel good that we’re contributing back out to the community.”last_img read more

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first_img GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMES Deep Impact, a seven-time G1 champion, died Tuesday at the age of 17. | KYODO obituary, Yutaka Take, Deep Impact, Sunday Silence, Grade One KEYWORDS Japanese racehorse Deep Impact, the winner of seven domestic Grade One titles and one of the world’s leading sires, was put down Tuesday at the age of 17, the stud farm operator said.According to the Shadai Stallion Station, Deep Impact, who was crowned Japanese Champion Sire for seven consecutive years from 2012, was euthanized after he was diagnosed with a cervical spine fracture on Tuesday morning from which he could not recover.center_img He underwent successful surgery to his neck on Sunday, but was unable to stand the following day due to the cervical fracture found by X-ray.The horse debuted in 2004 and earned his first G1 win at the Satsuki-sho the following year. Ridden by star jockey Yutaka Take, Deep Impact went on to win the next two legs, Japanese Derby and Kikka-sho, to complete the Japanese Triple Crown.He won 12 of his 14 career starts and was inducted into the Japan Racing Association Hall of Fame in 2008.After he was retired from racing at the end of 2006, Deep Impact took up stud duty in Hokkaido. He sired Kizuna, the winner of the 2013 Japanese Derby.Deep Impact was sired by Sunday Silence, the winner of the 1989 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, from Wind In Her Hair in 2002. RELATED PHOTOS IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5last_img read more

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first_imgDOHA, (Reuters) – A United States quartet led by Christian Coleman blazed to the 4×100 metres relay title at the world athletics championships yesterday, clocking the second fastest time ever at 37.10 seconds to end a 12-year gold medal drought. Coleman, world 100m champion, put the Americans ahead with a stunning start and 200m gold medallist Noah Lyles completed the job, crossing the line with his arms raised triumphantly in the air as his team mates celebrated wrapped in American flags.“We were all motivated to do something special and it just happened, everybody wanted it,” said Lyles, who will leave his first world championships with double gold.“We all wanted to break the curse, a generational curse and bring on a new era,” he added. “That is the part that feels the most exciting to think the time we break the curse is the time something great happens.“Every time you come across in the relay with the USA it is magical, all of a sudden you get this energy to run around the track again.”Defending champions Britain took the silver in 37.36 seconds, a European record, as Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake failed to catch Lyles on the final straight. Japan won bronze with a time of 37.43 seconds, an Asian record.Joining Coleman and Lyles, the two rising stars on the global sprint scene, were veterans in Justin Gatlin, twice world champion, and 34-year-old Mike Rodgers, who had never before stood atop a world championship or Olympic podium.After a wobbly performance in the heats in which Canada filed a protest against the U.S. for failing to make a proper exchange, the American quartet had a meeting to ensure there were no hiccups in the final. Victims of sloppy exchanges and dropped batons over the years, the message came through loud and clear as the United States made four clean exchanges in a polished effort to come home just outside Jamaica’s world record 36.84. “We had a meeting in the morning,” said Coleman, who also heads home with two golds. “We just got to come together, everybody just got to execute, focus on what they need to do, have an open dialogue about what went wrong in the prelims and what we are going to do better in the final.“If you never have that conversation then you are just going to go there and you kind of can’t expect different results,” Coleman added.“So we just got to talk about what we needed to do and everybody locked in and we got it done.”last_img read more

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