first_imgAdvertisements RelatedMinistry of Finance Re-opens Tax Policy Division FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Taxation Policy Division of the Ministry of Finance and the Public, which was closed last Wednesday (April 7), to facilitate Police investigations into the issue of waivers and concessionary letters, reopened Monday (April 12).Minister of Finance and the Public Service, Hon Audley ShawOpening the Budget Debate in the House of Representatives on Thursday (April 8), Minister of Finance and the Public Service, the Hon Audley Shaw, noted that, increasingly, corruption is being discovered in several areas of Taxation and Customs. However, he said that strong measures were being put in place to address the crisis.“The Revenue Protection Division (RPD) will be strengthened and enlarged to detect and prosecute tax officials, as well as their co-conspirators in the private sector, who cross the line,” Mr. Shaw said.On Wednesday (April 7), the Ministry issued the following release:“The Ministry of Finance and the Public Service wishes to advise its stakeholders and the general public that due to an on-going police investigation on matters dealing with the issuing of waivers and concessionary letters, the Taxation Policy Division has been temporarily closed until Monday, April 12, 2010.“The Ministry regrets and apologizes for any inconvenience caused by the temporary suspension of waivers and concession letters and asks for your patience as we resolve this matter.”The Ministry issued the following release Monday (April 12) on the reopening for business of the Taxation Policy Division:“The Ministry of Finance and the Public Service wishes to advise the public that theTaxation Policy Division has reopened for business on a phased basis.“Due to constraints arising from the ongoing investigations with regards to the issuing of waivers and concessions, applicants will experience some delays in the processing of applications. In the interim, persons may contact the Ministry with regards to the status of their application via telephone (876) 932-4793/4 and email [email protected]“Applicants should be aware that payment of full duties and taxes on goods and services is an avenue that remains open. If a waiver is approved subsequently, then the duties will be refunded in part or in full. Please be aware that there are no guarantees that all such requests for waivers will be approved.“With respect to the 20% Duty Concessions, the processing time will go beyond the normal seven working days.“The Ministry regrets and apologizes for the inconveniences caused and asks for your patience as we try to restore normality to operations as soon as possible.” RelatedMinistry of Finance Re-opens Tax Policy Divisioncenter_img RelatedMinistry of Finance Re-opens Tax Policy Division Ministry of Finance Re-opens Tax Policy Division Finance & Public ServiceApril 12, 2010last_img read more

Posted in oohiwmwh

first_imgAndrew PattonShawnee Mission East graduate Andrew Patton is among four University of Kansas School of Medicine — Wichita students to receive the E.P. Donatelle, M.D., Student Scholarship Award this year.The award is given each year to a varying number of students who ranked highly in the third year Family Medicine Clerkship, and who rank in at least the top half of the medical school class. The award is $1,000 for each student. The award is named in honor of Donatelle, who served as the first chair of the Department of Family and Community Medicine on the Wichita campus from 1979 to 1988.Patton’s wife Bailey, originally from Overland Park, was among the eight Family Medicine students to receive scholarships this year as well. She was one of two recipients of the Monte Maska, M.D., Student Scholarship.last_img read more

Posted in pzkvckff

first_imgTak lama berselang, Shelby dihampiri oleh salah seorang awak kabin dari KLM yang memintanya untuk menutupi payudaranya dengan menggunakan selimut ketika tengah menyusui. Tentu saja lain halnya jika kejadian ini terjadi di Indonesia, dimana hal yang menyinggung masalah ‘organ sensitif’ seorang wanita masih sangat tabu, Shelby merasa tersinggung karena permintaan dari awak kabin ini.Shelby merasa tidak dihargai atas permintaan untuk menutupi payudaranya tersebut dengan menggunakan selimut. Di media sosial Facebook, Shelby lalu mengunggah curahan hatinya yang juga dikirimnya kepada akun resmi dari maskapai KLM, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines.“Ini merupakan peringatan terhadap semua Ibu menyusui: JANGAN mengudara dengan menggunakan KLM!” begitulah kurang lebih pembukaan dari Shelby yang geram akan perlakuan yang ia terima dari awak kabin KLM.“Saya menyusui anak saya yang berusia satu tahun agar ia bisa tenang dan penerbangannya menjadi nyaman,” tambah Shelby.Namun ketika pesawat hendak take-off, Shelby dihampiri oleh seorang awak kabin yang membawakannya selimut dan awak kabin tersebut berkata, “jika Anda ingin terus menyusui anak Anda, silakan tutupi dengan menggunakan ini (selimut),”Kala itu Shelby menolak karena anaknya merupakan tipikal anak yang tidak suka jika ditutupi oleh selimut ketika sedang disusui.“Sepanjang perjalanan, awak kabin tersebut sama sekali tidak pernah memandang mata saya dan di situ saya merasa tidak nyaman dan tidak dihargai,” ujar Shelby.Menanggapi unggahan Shelby di Facebook tersebut, pihak KLM mengatakan bahwa sama sekali tidak ada larangan untuk menyusui di dalam kabin.Baca Juga: Bantu Penumpang Bawa Barang Hingga ke Gerbang, KLM Hadirkan Robot Care-E“Hanya saja tidak semua penumpang nyaman dengan pemandangan tersebut (seorang Ibu yang menyusui anaknya dengan kondisi payudara yang terumbar). Maka dari itu kami berinisiatif untuk menciptakan situasi yang kondusif dan nyaman bagi semua penumpang yang berada di dalam kabin – salah satunya dengan membawakan selimut untuk menutupi bagian payudaranya,” jelas juru bicara dari KLM.Walhasil, unggahan Shelby di Facebook ini menjadi topik hangat perbincangan dan menghasilkan lebih dari 1.500 komentar dan dibagikan sebanyak 374 kali.Bagaimana menurut Anda? Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading… Related Shelby Angel. Sumber: Meaww Maskapai penerbangan asal Belanda, KLM, menghadapi kecaman dari berbagai pihak karena kebijakan yang dianggap mendiskiriminasi salah satu organ tubuh wanita. Tudingan ini menjadi ramai dibicarakan setelah pihak maskapai meminta kepada salah satu penumpangnya untuk menutupi bagian payudaranya ketika tengah menyusui dengan alasan kalau-kalau ada penumpang lain yang merasa kurang nyaman dengan pemandangan tersebut.Baca Juga: Ternyata, Jakarta Merupakan Destinasi Penerbangan Antar Benua Perdana KLM!Sebagaimana yang dirangkum KabarPenumpang.com dari berbagai laman sumber, seorang penumpang yang bernama Shelby Angel menyatakan bahwa dirinya tengah berada di dalam penerbangan KLM dari San Francisco menuju Amsterdam pada Juni lalu. Shelby yang kala itu membawa serta anaknya yang masih balita menyusui sang buah hati ketika pesawat tengah mengudara.last_img read more

Posted in awzhpora

first_imgWe’ve all been wondering how ronnie sharp voted.  Now we know in this week’s edition of “Forgotten People/Places and Old Geezers.”.  CLICK HERE.  Enjoy!  (WLAF NEWS PUBLISHED – 08/13/2018-6AM) Share this:FacebookTwitterlast_img

Posted in awzhpora

first_imgThe Ravens failed to make the postseason for the fourth time in five years, but where exactly did their players stack up across the NFL in 2017?Whether it’s discussing the Pro Bowl or picking postseason awards, media and fans spend much time debating where players rank at each position, but few put in the necessary time and effort to watch every player on every team extensively enough to develop any kind of an authoritative opinion.Truthfully, how many times did you closely watch the offensive line of the Los Angeles Chargers this season? What about the Detroit Lions linebackers or the Miami Dolphins cornerbacks?That’s why I can appreciate projects such as Bleacher Report’s NFL1000 and the grading efforts of Pro Football Focus. Of course, neither should be viewed as the gospel of evaluation and each is subjective, but I respect the exhaustive effort to grade players across the league when so many of us watch only one team or one division on any kind of a consistent basis. It’s important to note that the following PFF rankings are where the player stood at the conclusion of the regular season.Below is a look at where Ravens running backs ranked across the league, according to those outlets:Alex Collins2017 offensive snap count: 378 NFL1000 ranking: 12th PFF ranking: 5th Skinny: The 23-year-old was a terrific addition for a below-average offense and finished ninth in yards per carry, but his 2.96 yards per attempt average over the last three games and a slight 210-pound frame make it fair to take pause before assuming he’ll automatically thrive with a bigger workload next season.Buck Allen2017 offensive snap count: 466NFL1000 ranking: 46thPFF ranking: 33rdSkinny: The 2015 fourth-round pick rebounded from a disappointing 2016 to emerge as a solid No. 2 back by averaging 3.9 yards per carry and scoring six touchdowns. Allen caught 46 passes, but his 5.4 yards per catch ranked last in the NFL among qualified players and reflected his limited elusiveness.Danny Woodhead 2017 offensive snap count: 157 NFL1000 ranking: 55thPFF ranking: n/a Skinny: A significant hamstring injury cost Woodhead nearly nine full games, and he has now appeared in only 29 contests over his last four seasons because of injuries. Though the 32-year-old returned in November, he averaged just 6.1 yards per catch and didn’t eclipse 50 yards from scrimmage once.Terrance West2017 offensive snap count: 66NFL1000 ranking: n/aPFF ranking: n/a Skinny: A calf injury suffered in Oakland in Week 5 cost West multiple games, but the writing was on the wall when he was healthy again as Collins had secured the starting gig and Allen was the more versatile backup. The Baltimore native will be an unrestricted free agent and is unlikely to return.2018 positional outlookWith Collins under team control for two more years and Allen still having a year remaining on his rookie deal, the running back position is clearly in better shape than the other skill spots on this offense. The wild card is Kenneth Dixon, who will be coming off a major knee injury and two drug-related suspensions. A healthy and motivated Dixon paired with Collins would be intriguing, but the latter showed enough success in Greg Roman’s blocking schemes to have confidence in him entering 2018 as the starter, especially with guards Marshal Yanda and Alex Lewis back in the fold. Woodhead remains under contract, but Baltimore could save $1.8 million in salary cap space by releasing him. The Ravens should keep their eyes peeled for game-changing talent at any position and could still add a running back later in the draft, but you wouldn’t expect the position to be a top priority to address this offseason.last_img read more

Posted in xawlvtwz

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored After decades of overall increase, Antarctica’s sea ice has been rapidly decreasing since 2014, according to a new study.Between 2014 and 2017, Antarctica suffered a precipitous decline, losing more yearly average sea ice in just three years than that observed in the Arctic over a period of 33 years.There was a small increase in the yearly average sea ice in Antarctica from 2017 to 2018, but there has been a decline in 2019 again. Whether the small uptick in 2018 is a blip in an otherwise long-term downward trend of Antarctic sea ice extent or the start of a rebound, is difficult to say, Claire Parkinson of NASA writes.Whether the changes are because of climate change or something else also remains to be seen, researchers say. For decades, sea ice in Antarctica has increased while that in the Arctic has declined drastically. But in a puzzling turn of events, Antarctic sea ice has been decreasing rapidly since 2014, a new study has found. Whether the changes are because of climate change or something else remains to be seen, study author Claire Parkinson of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center says.Parkinson, who analyzed satellite measurements of Antarctic sea ice over a 40-year period from 1979 to 2018, found that the yearly average sea ice extent peaked in 2014. But over the next three years, from 2014 to 2017, the sea ice extent hit its lowest average annual levels. Where the yearly average sea ice extent was a record-high at 12.8 million square kilometers (5 million square miles) in 2014, it reached 10.75 million square kilometers (4 million square miles) in 2017, with a record-low average monthly sea ice extent of 2.29 million square kilometers (0.88 million square miles) in February 2017.In fact, between 2014 and 2017, Antarctica suffered a precipitous decline, Parkinson writes, losing more yearly average sea ice in just three years than that observed in the Arctic over a period of 33 years.Is this downward trend going to continue? Researchers aren’t sure.“But it raises the question of why, and are we going to see some huge acceleration in the rate of decrease in the Arctic? Only the continued record will let us know,” Parkinson told the Guardian.Despite multiple hypotheses, researchers are yet to figure out why Antarctica’s sea ice extent has generally increased since 1979. The cause of the recent decline, too, is a mystery.The satellite measurements, for example, showed a small increase in the yearly average sea ice in Antarctica from 2017 to 2018, but there has been a decline in 2019 again. Whether the small uptick in 2018 is a blip in an otherwise long-term downward trend of Antarctic sea ice extent or the start of a rebound, is difficult to say, Parkinson writes in the paper. Moreover, even during the decades of overall increase in Antarctic sea ice, there have been periods of declines followed by an increase.“There was a period in the 1970s when the Antarctic also had a huge decrease in sea ice and then increased,” Parkinson told New Scientist. “So it could be this huge decrease over a few years [2014 to 2017] is going to reverse.”Parkinson had previously shown that the increases in Antarctic sea ice through 2014 did not compensate for the rapid loss of sea ice in the Arctic. This was because “the decreases in Arctic sea ice far exceed the increases in Antarctic sea ice,” she told NOAA Climate.gov in March this year.The Antarctic represents a complex system, and Parkinson says she hopes the 40-year satellite data will spur more research.“I hope that the 40-y record discussed in this paper will encourage further studies into the atmospheric and oceanic conditions that could have led to the extremely rapid 2014-2017 decline of the Antarctic sea ice cover, the comparably rapid decline in the mid-1970s, and the uneven but overall gradual increases in Antarctic sea ice coverage in the intervening decades,” she writes in the paper.Sea ice in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica. Image by Acaro via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Citation:Parkinson, C. L. (2019). A 40-y record reveals gradual Antarctic sea ice increases followed by decreases at rates far exceeding the rates seen in the Arctic. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201906556. doi:10.1073/pnas.1906556116center_img Climate, Climate Change, Climate Science, Environment, Global Warming, Research, Sea Ice last_img read more

Posted in awzhpora

first_imgAgriculture, Agroforestry, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Community Development, Indigenous Peoples Article published by Erik Hoffner The highly climate- and biodiversity-friendly agricultural practice of agroforestry is now practiced widely around the world, but its roots are deeply indigenous.Agroforestry is the practice of growing of trees, shrubs, herbs, and vegetables together in a group mimicking a forest, and its originators were indigenous peoples who realized that growing useful plants together created a system where each species benefited the others.Agroforestry is now estimated to cover one billion hectares globally and sequester over 45 gigatons of carbon from the atmosphere, a figure that grows annually.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Agroforestry, or forest gardening, is the practice of growing of trees, shrubs, herbs, and vegetables together in a group mimicking a forest, or within an existing forest, with each plant providing the others benefits like shade, protection from predators, life-giving humidity, and nutrients. A main group of practitioners of agroforestry are indigenous, and they often report that there is no phrase for it in their language; rather, it is often referred to, as with the Lenca people of Honduras, as “traditional technique.” It is best thought of as a technology, one that provides food, fuel, and marketable commodities like fiber crops, medicines, resins, and fruit in a harmonious natural system while providing a host of other benefits.Members of Cosagual Lenca womens’ cooperative in front of shade-grown coffee under pine trees on their traditional land in Honduras. Image by Monica Pelliccia for MongabayShade grown coffee and chocolate are the most recognizable examples of this indigenous technology that now covers over a billion hectares of land worldwide—roughly the size of Canada—and which is found nearly everywhere that trees grow, from wet regions to dry ones.Thousands of years of observing which useful plants and trees grow well together, planting the seeds of one under another, and creating an inviting ecosystem for seed dispersing animals has yielded bountiful agroforestry landscapes that look like natural forests and are enjoyed by all manner of creatures, both wild and cultivated.In Indonesia, agroforestry plots exhibit amazing biodiversity: “home gardens” there are a type of multi-layered agroforestry that are considered to have the highest biodiversity of any human-created ecosystem, containing 60 to 70 percent of the animal species found in the surrounding rainforests, according to one study.See related: Fire and agroforestry revive California indigenous groups’ traditionsIn Thailand, Prasert Tralkansuphakon, chair of Pgakenyaw Association for Sustainable Development and Inter Mountain People Education and Culture Association, explains that his Pgakenyaw (Karen) community manages land this way too. Agroforestry means ‘managed both by human and nature,’  or by humans in a natural way,” he says. “We make a living in three spaces: one is the space of residence, second is the space of farming and cultivation, and the third is a space of collecting food. Therefore, the concept of agroforestry produces both food and income in a traditional and innovative way, managed both by humans and nature, or [just] by humans, but in a natural way.”On the other side of the world, a Lenca community in Honduras has formed a women’s cooperative that is growing fair trade organic coffee under timber and fruit-bearing trees like mango, plantain, and jackfruit. “Agroforestry is a way to increase food security. The diversity of the crops allows an increase in production of fruit and vegetables [that] could be interchanged with the other members of the community, or [for sale] to the market,” Mongabay’s reporter was told.Antonella Cordone, senior technical specialist of indigenous peoples and tribal issues at the International Fund for Agricultural Development, believes the world must learn from such examples to create sustainable and integrated methods to manage agriculture and ecosystems in a multifunctional way. The approach her program has taken is based on appreciative inquiry, building on the skills and knowledge shared by indigenous agroforestry practitioners, and offering new ideas to bolster what they are already doing in an additive way. Cordone stated, “Specialists in modern agroforestry can help local communities to the extent they are able to listen to indigenous peoples and local communities and recognize that indigenous peoples’ knowledge is not inferior to formal science and technology.”Roger Leakey, an author and agroforestry expert, agrees. When he was director of research at the World Agroforestry Centre—the top international NGO studying and training communities in agroforestry techniques—rather than taking a prescriptive approach, the organization developed a highly successful method of “participatory domestication,” a bottom-up approach that consisted of engaging with communities from day one to grow the species that they felt were the most beneficial to them.Syed Ajijur Rahman, consultant at the Center for International Forestry Research in Bogor, Indonesia, agreed that in many ways, the communities know best: “The familiarity with their land, leading to careful selection  of sites for tree planting, together with good tree husbandry, results in high levels of tree establishment and growth rates.”Jim Kelly in the community of Bampu, Papua New Guinea, stands next to a young cacao tree within an agroforestry garden. Image by Camilo Mejia Giraldo for Mongabay.Such high productivity has obvious benefits for the communities who practice it. Because there is a great diversity of trees, shrubs, and annuals growing together, not only are yields increased by greater soil fertility and moisture, but a variety of crops are also produced, and on different time scales. For example, while the Lenca in the dry forests of the southeastern corner of Honduras are waiting for their coffee beans to ripen, they have many other fruits to harvest, such as plantains, which are fried and sold to local markets, or guamo, also called ice cream bean, which is eaten fresh. Or they can trade timber products for corn grown by another community nearby, one which practices an agroforestry technique named Quesungual, where coffee bushes are mixed with fruit trees pruned to a specific height that creates cool shade and moist soils under which maize and beans are also grown.The improved quality of the agroforestry shade grown coffee also creates big economic benefits for the Lenca women’s cooperative. Sixty-year-old Eva Alvarado is one of the founders of the cooperative and now its vice president, a role she confessed she never thought she would play in life. But the economics are more important to her than the empowerment, she told Mongabay’s reporter. “I paid for the education for all my kids, and now my six grandchildren. This is the third generation that benefits from the work of our cooperative,” she said.Indigenous communities around the world are not the only ones to benefit from agroforestry’s increases in food security and community resilience. Thanks to agroforestry,  all manner of wildlife are finding more homes in the branches of these food forests.See related: Agroforestry ‘home gardens’ build community resilience in southern EthiopiaA less tangible benefit also accrues to the global good: slowing climate change. The climate effects of creating food forests is chiefly noticeable on a local scale, especially dry ones like a community in El Salvador, where growers of shade grown cacao are benefiting from improving river levels and cooler air temperatures since their agroforestry system matured. In other hot, dry areas, such as Africa’s Sahel region, farmers practice agroforestry because crops grow better under trees than they do in the open; their shade becomes a refuge for livestock and people, and reduces the sometimes deadly soil surface temperatures that can kill annual crops. Plus, the tree roots work like hydraulic pumps, bringing water up from the deep, as much as 20 meters below the soil’s surface. This moisture becomes available to crops planted underneath the trees, such as maize, even when it’s not the rainy season.But the biggest climate benefit from indigenous agroforestry is the amount of carbon dioxide that is taken out of the atmosphere by agroforestry’s millions of square kilometers of trees, shrubs, palms, roots, veggies, and vines (not to mention the carbon captured in their richer soils). A recent study published in the journal Nature estimates that agroforestry captures .73 more gigatons of carbon every year from the air (in addition to the 45 gigatons a study published in the journal Nature estimates it to sequester).That is a lot, at a time of rising worldwide emissions; in 2017 carbon dioxide emissions increased approximately 2 percent, and almost a quarter of these emissions came from conventional agriculture and the conversion of forests and wetlands into farmland.A woman in southern Ethiopia peels enset to make a staple food, kocho bread. Image by Tesfa-Alem Tekle for Mongabay.The world would do well to follow the lead of indigenous technologists by planting more trees in agricultural land-scapes, and in useful combinations. Even growing trees in cattle pastures, a technique known as silvopasture, is shown to yield better forage for the animals while capturing carbon and providing fruit, medicines, and other useful products. Yet for Tralkansuphakon’s Pgakenyaw community, the reasons for practicing agroforestry are highly local and cultural, passed down from generation to generation. For them, agroforestry is based on a proverb: “Au hti k’ tau hti Auf kauj k’ tauz kauj,” which means, “Use water, care for the river; use land, care  for the forest.”Erik Hoffner is the editor of Mongabay’s ongoing series on agroforestry, view all the features here. This essay originally appeared here in the journal of indigenous peoples, Cultural Survival Quarterly, in September 2018.Banner image: Cherangani traditional healer Richard Kiplagat holds roots harvested in the forest. Chepkresmeywo, at right, is used to treat typhoid, and kasisit is said to treat sexually transmitted diseases. Image by Sophie Mbugua for Mongabay.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Posted in fofabvlic

first_imgIn February 2018, a greater one-horned rhino wandered from India’s Orang National Park into the nearby Burachapori-Laokhowa Wildlife Sanctuary.In September 2018, officials lost track of the rhino. In June 2019, the rhino’s buried remains, and a bullet, were discovered close to a guard camp in Burachapori-Laokhowa.Officials in Burachapori-Laokhowa did not officially report the rhino missing until the matter was leaked to the press more than a month later.Suspicion has been cast, variously, on forest staff, illegal settlers and illegal fishers. ASSAM, India — On Feb. 5, 2018, rangers at Orang National Park in the northeast Indian state of Assam received multiple phone calls from villagers reporting sightings of a stray rhino.Dawdling and lounging on one of the numerous islands in the Brahmaputra River, the rhino had traveled about 10 kilometers (6 miles) from the safety of the park, which harbors 102 greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis).It isn’t uncommon for rhinos to stray out of the protected habitats in Assam. A study in one sanctuary, Pobitora, found that as many as 40 percent of the rhinos there wandered in and out of the sanctuary’s borders on a daily basis. Monitoring these animals, and if necessary corralling them back to safety, is a regular part of the state forest department’s job.This particular case, however, would come to a bad end for both the rhino and the wildlife department. Eight months after the rhino first wandered out of Orang, rangers completely lost track of her — a lapse forest officials only publicly acknowledged after it was leaked to the media. She wasn’t seen again until June 2019, when her skeleton was unearthed in the vicinity of a forest guard encampment, leaving forest officials facing uncomfortable questions about what exactly happened to the animal, and why officials had suppressed and distorted information about her disappearance.A group of forest officials including Kaziranga National Park director P Shivkumar (second from left), Orang National Park administrator Ramesh Kumar Gogoi (third from left) and honorary wildlife warden Saurav Borkataky (fourth from left), were part of the vigil on the wandering rhino on the night 6 Feb, 2018. Image courtesy of Saurav Borkataky.A wandering rhinoIt all started ordinarily enough, recalls Ramesh Kumar Gogoi, the divisional forest officer of Mangaldai wildlife division and administrator of Orang National Park. Just past noon on Feb. 5, 2018, his office began fielding calls about a stray rhino from villagers near Singri, a cluster of picturesque hills squatting by the Brahmaputra River. Gogoi and his team leapt into action, he says: There had been several previous cases of rhinos being poached when they strayed out of the park to the char, or islands and sandbars, which dot the river, so they immediately rushed to try to bring the animal back to the park.Their attempts proved futile. For three days the rhino, a female sub-adult, moved from one char to another along the Brahmaputra. Finally, on Feb. 8, she made her way to the relative safety of another protected area, Burachapori-Laokhowa Wildlife Sanctuary, which sits on the river’s southern bank.“It was quite a spectacle,” Gogoi says. “Thousands of villagers gathered to see the rhino as she wandered in these char areas.”An ideal rhino habitat, Burachapori-Laokhowa WLS in the early 1980s harbored more than 70 rhinos, but all were wiped out by poachers during the political unrest of the Assam Agitation. In 2016, two rhinos, a mother and her daughter, were translocated to the sanctuary from Kaziranga National Park as part of the Indian Rhino Vision 2020 (IRV 2020) program, but both animals died within months, reportedly due to natural causes.So the newly arrived rhino became the sole, unchallenged representative of her tribe in Burachapori-Laokhowa.And she thrived.“The rhino was observed to be in a great health and was often seen wallowing in the marshes and pits that dot the Burachapori-Laokhowa landscape,” says Samarjit Ojah, a private citizen committed to conservation appointed by the government as an honorary wildlife warden of the Assam state forest department.Nearly eight months after her arrival in Burachapori-Laokhowa, the rhino disappeared.From that point forward, the official record of the rhino is scant. On the night of Sept. 24, she was seen trying to move outside of the sanctuary, according to an official report filed Nov. 3, 2018. The report, seen by Mongabay, notes that forest guards managed to keep her inside the sanctuary that night, but never saw her again and had no clues as to her whereabouts.Five days after that report was filed — roughly six weeks after the last known sighting of the rhino — sanctuary authorities officially informed their colleagues and superiors that the rhino was gone. On Nov. 8, Jitendra Kumar, then the divisional forest officer of Nagaon wildlife division, under whose jurisdiction Burachapori-Laokhowa sanctuary falls, sent a letter to Assam’s principal chief conservator of forests for wildlife, the chief wildlife warden, and the Orang park authorities. Kumar wrote that sanctuary officials had on Oct. 26 spotted “approximately 20 to 25 days older footprints” of the rhino on a char called Daora Tapu. The island is along the same route the rhino had followed when traveling out of Orang National Park. On the basis of these footprints, Kumar concluded that the rhino had crossed the Brahmaputra and returned to Orang, her former home.However, Orang authorities said they had no reason to believe the rhino had, in fact, returned. Divisional forest officer Gogoi, in his official response to Kumar’s report, wrote that his office “had no information or evidence of the re-entry of the rhino in Orang National Park.” In the letter, he noted that when the rhino strayed out of Orang in February 2018, it generated so much attention that a magistrate had to be brought in to control the rowdy crowds that gathered to see it. By contrast, during the animal’s supposed return to Orang along the same route, there wasn’t a single eyewitness, or any other signs of the rhino’s passage apart from a single set of footprints allegedly found by Burachapori-Laokhowa officials.Nonetheless, the official theory put forth by wildlife officials held that the rhino was safely back in Orang.This explanation was upended on June 24, 2019, when the rhino’s buried remains were unearthed, along with a bullet. Acting on a tip, India’s wildlife crime investigating agency, the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau (WCCB), along with officials from the Nagaon wildlife division and Orang National Park, located the burial site inside Burachapori-Laokhowa WLS, near the Polashtoli forest guard camp.“It’s clear that the rhino fell victim to poachers as we recovered a used bullet near the skeletal remains. The footprints mentioned in my predecessor Kumar’s report must have been old footprints or that of another rhino,” says Ranjith Ram, the current divisional forest officer at Nagaon wildlife division.Poaching remains the biggest threat to rhinos in India: Kaziranga National Park, which hosts two-thirds of the greater one-horned rhinos left on Earth, saw nearly 100 rhinos poached from 2013 to 2018. And the present case is by no means the first time a rhino was shot very close to a guard post. In 2015, for example, a rhino was shot and buried close to a guard camp in Kaziranga National Park, an incident that resulted in the arrest of four forest guards.The rhino in question. After wandering out of Orang National Park, this female sub-adult eventually met her demise in the Burachapori-Laokhowa wildlife sanctuary.  Image courtesy of Saurav Borkataky.The disappearance of the rhino was hushed upThat the rhino was poached close to a forest guard camp was not the only fact that reflected poorly on the forest department. There were other aspects too, including tardy and inconsistent reporting.The last confirmed sighting of the rhino was on the night of Sept. 24, 2018, but news of the rhino’s disappearance was kept quiet for more than a month until the matter was leaked to the press.  On Oct. 27, 2018, the popular Assamese-language daily Dainik Agradoot ran an article, citing anonymous sources, reporting that the sole rhino in Burachapori-Laokhowa had gone missing and that forest officials in the sanctuary were keeping the matter under wraps.According to Arup Kalita, the journalist who wrote the article, the information came from a whistle-blower within the forest department who insisted his identity be protected. “Once the news was out, the Burachapori-Laokhowa authorities ringed me up informing that they have been conducting intensive search operations to track down the rhino,” Kalita told Mongabay. “Four days later, on October 31, they informed me that they had been able to locate footprints of the rhino on a char close to Orang National Park and the rhino had safely returned to its former home.”Kalita filed a story for the same newspaper on Nov. 1, 2018, reporting the development. “In my mind, however, I was suspicious,” he says. “Was it a mere coincidence that they’d found the elusive rhino’s footprints immediately after the story was out?”The publication of the articles in the local media was followed by an apparent flurry of activity in late October. But it was only on Nov. 8 that Kumar, the divisional forest officer in charge of Burachapori-Laokhowa, sent his official letter informing Assam’s principal chief conservator of forests and the authorities at Orang National Park that they’d lost track of the animal.Not only did this letter come after the Dainik Agradoot articles brought the matter to public attention, it also came 13 days after forest officials said they had found rhino footprints on a river island near Orang — thereby causing the loss of crucial time for Orang authorities to check whether animal had really returned to the park.“Had they been serious, they’d have immediately informed the Orang authorities,” says Saurav Borkataky, an honorary wildlife warden of the Assam state forest department at Tezpur. “The apparently deliberate delay in reporting raises questions on the roles of the forest officials in Burachapori-Laokhowa,” adds Borkataky, who was part of the team keeping constant vigil on the rhino when she first strayed out of Orang National Park in February 2018.When local media revealed that the rhino’s disappearance had gone unreported for more than a month, and later that her skeletal remains were found close to a forest guard camp, it raised suspicion in some quarters that officials may have somehow been complicit in the rhino’s death.“Why would they hush up the matter for so long if they’ve no hidden interest in it?” asks Tezpur-based environmental activist Dilip Nath.Though it may sound like speculation, concern about forest officials’ involvement in wildlife crime has been echoed by no less than the office of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. A recently released report on the management of India’s tiger reserves put a spotlight on an alleged forest official-rhino poacher nexus in Kaziranga National Park, which is also a tiger reserve. “The poaching of three rhinos on 2 and 4 November 2017 took place in the night, barely 200 m from Tunikati anti-poaching camp, in Burhapahar range, Kaziranga Tiger Reserve,” notes the report, prepared by the Wildlife Institute of India and the National Tiger Conservation Authority on behalf of the government and released by Modi on July 29. It notes that with 178 anti-poaching camps in a 911-square-kilometer (352-square-mile) reserve, each post is responsible for patrolling just 5 square kilometers (1.9 square miles). “Given the resources at the command of the personnel it should not be difficult to guard the area effectively,” the report reads. “Such poaching so close to the camp leads to a suspicion of the involvement of officials.”There have also been previous instances where forest guards faced charges in cases of rhino poaching. In addition to the 2015 case that saw four current or former forest guards arrested in Kaziranga, a forest guard in Orang National Park was arrested in 2015 for his alleged involvement in a rhino poaching incident, though he was later acquitted.Even high-ranking officials such divisional forest officers have been convicted of wildlife crimes and corruption. In 2016, police seized illegally hoarded tiger skin, deer skin, ivory and other wildlife products in the house of a divisional forest officer who had been caught accepting bribes.One-horned rhinos roaming in Kaziranga National Park. Photo by Udayan Dasgupta for Mongabay.A controversial photograph and other inconsistenciesThe location of the rhino’s body and the tardy reporting by Burachapori-Laokhowa WLS are not the only red flags critics point to.Many are skeptical about the authenticity of the rhino footprints the Burachapori-Laokhowa officials claimed to have spotted on the char close to Orang National Park. The report submitted by Kumar says the footprints were 20 to 25 days old when they were spotted on Oct. 26, 2018. But is it really possible that rhino footprints can remain intact for that long on the loose, sandy soil of a char during the month of October, which sees considerable rainfall in Assam? “Usually, it’s very unlikely. A single strong downpour washes away the surface soil on these char islands,” says honorary warden Borkataky.More questions have been raised by a photograph included with Kumar’s report as evidence that a team of forest officials and civil administrators verified the footprints two days after they were first found.The report states that “on 28/10/18 K.S. Dekaraja, AFS ACF, Sri Samarjit Ojha (honorary wildlife warden) along with Shri K Sharma, ACS, ADC, Circle Officer, Tezpur visited the same area and confirmed the same.” While there is no mention of the photograph in the report itself, it was obtained by activist Dilip Nath through India’s Right to Information Act.Although Shri K. Sharma is named in the report as a witness, he does not actually appear in the group photograph. Instead, a different person with the exact same title—“ACS, ADC, Sonitpur” (meaning Assam Civil Service, Assistant District Commissioner, Sonitpur) can be seen, namely Nabajyoti Ojha.When Mongabay spoke to K. Sharma, named in the report as having verified the rhino footprints, he denied visiting the spot, or having any knowledge of the incident.Honorary wildlife warden Sri Samarjit Ojah, who does appear in the photo and was part of the team, says they were in the area on Oct. 28 for a land survey that was in no way connected to the search for the missing rhino. According to Ojah, Ali Hussain (who also appears in the photo), the Burachapori Laokhowa forest official who according to Kumar’s report had spotted the footprints two days before, was accompanying the team and insisted they also visit the spot where the rhino footprints were found. “The photograph taken on the spot was just a personal memento and not meant to be used as an evidence for an official report,” Ojah says.Nabajyoti Ojha, currently an administrator in Mangaldai district (who appears in the photograph but is not mentioned in the report), also told Mongabay he was unaware that the photograph was being used by Kumar as official evidence. Like Samarjit, he said the purpose of their visit was a land survey unconnected to the case of the missing rhino.Both told Mongabay that they were in no position to verify and “confirm” that those were rhino footprints. “I’m neither an Asian rhino expert, nor a forest official. How would I verify rhino footmarks?” Ojha asks.Moreover, in the official letter Kumar sent on Nov. 8 to his superiors informing them about the rhino’s disappearance and possible return to Orang, the date on which the pachyderm went missing was stated as “25/11/2018” — 17 days into the future. While this appears to be a clerical error and can be discounted as a mistake, activist Nath says, “Coming from a senior forest official this demonstrates a lack of care and seriousness towards the matter, if not anything else.”Jitendra Kumar, currently a divisional forest officer at Guwahati Wildlife Division, did not respond to multiple requests for comment by phone and in writing.Orang National Park, located in northern Assam is home to around 100 rhinos. Until the wandering rhino’s remains were unearthed, the official theory held that she had made her way back to her original home in Orang. Image by Bikash Kumar Bhattacharya for Mongabay.More theories about the rhino’s deathForest officials are not the only group being viewed with suspicion after the discovery of the rhino’s remains. There are two additional theories afloat: One implicates illegal settlers, and the other illegal fishermen operating inside the sanctuary.Since the 1950s, Assam has lost 4,270 square kilometers (1,822 square miles) of land to erosion, more than 7 percent of the state’s total area. This partially explains why more than 22 percent of the state’s forest areas are under encroachment.In the Burachapori-Laokhowa sanctuary, some 32.5 square kilometers (12.5 square miles) are under encroachment. Most of these encroachers are flood refugees, former char dwellers ravaged by flood, says Abu Bakkar Siddique, who lives in Juria Kaliadinga, a village on the fringes of the sanctuary. “The mighty Brahmaputra erodes away massive tracts of land and submerges numerous char islands every year, as well as creating some new sandbars along its course. Many of these people rendered landless by erosion have encroached upon forestland.”Both the authorities and the settlers recognize that there are illegal settlements, says Siddique. “However, as the government has failed to rehabilitate these flood-ravaged people, there is a tacit understanding: the settlers will be allowed to continue to live in the area they’re occupying as the land has already converted into agricultural fields and there’s no forest cover on it, but there should be no further encroachment. And the people respected it.”When Jitendra Kumar took charge of the sanctuary as a divisional forest officer, he said he had “plans to reclaim and reforest these encroached lands” and gave the go-ahead for an eviction drive in January this year. The move led to a standoff between the forest officers and the illegal settlers, with the latter attacking Kumar and other forest officials.Because Kumar initiated the eviction drive, strong resentment brewed against him among illegal encroachers, says Ali Hussain, the Burachapori-Laokhowa forest staffer who supposedly spotted the footprints of the missing rhino. “Therefore, some angry settlers, with the help of hired guns, may have conspired in killing the rhino near a forest camp to smear Kumar and the forest department.”However, Siddique and other villagers in encroached settlements Mongabay spoke with denied this allegation as “an utter nonsense and entirely baseless.”The other theory points to the illegal fishermen operating inside the sanctuary.Dilwar Hussain, a member of the local conservation nonprofit Laokhowa Burachapori Biodiversity Conservation Society, says there has been rampant illegal fishing in the numerous beels, or water bodies, inside the sanctuary. “Before the Burachapori-Laokhowa forest was accorded the status of a WLS in 1995, the government used to sell fishing licenses to fish in the waterbodies. However, it became illegal after the forest was accorded protected status. But fishing in the sanctuary’s numerous waterbodies never really ceased,” says Hussain, whose own father once held a license to fish in Burachapori-Laokhowa.Fishing in and around the protected area is a vital source of livelihood for a huge number of people near the wildlife sanctuary, says Siddique. “There are two types of fisher: small, subsistence fishers and commercial fishers who go for relatively big-scale fishing. While the authorities generally don’t take much issue with the first type, they remain vigilant on the second type. When the rhino arrived in the area, it was the commercial fishers whose activities were perturbed and came to a halt. Therefore, some forest officials are propounding the theory that some of these fishermen might have ganged up with poachers to weed out the obstacle — the rhino.”In this 2016 image, forest officials are seen seizing fishing nets and equipment in Roumari beel inside Burachapori-Laokhowa WLS. Image courtesy of Laokhowa Burhachapori Conservation Society.Ongoing investigationAmid this speculation, the Assam state forest department and the WCCB are conducting a joint investigation into the rhino’s disappearance and subsequent death. Mongabay has learned that so far investigators have identified three figures of interest, all from the nearby village of Phutaljhar. Investigators, who are now questioning them, refuse to divulge further information about the case, but local sources allege the three men have records of involvement in past wildlife crimes, including illegal fishing inside the sanctuary.Meanwhile, wildlife activists and residents Mongabay spoke to demand what they call “a free and fair investigation” into the actions of the forest officials.Without a transparent and impartial investigation, honorary wildlife warden Borkataky and activist Nath say they fear the entire episode could inflame existing tensions between residents and forest officials. Historically, people on the fringes of what is now the Burachapori-Laokhowa sanctuary depended heavily on fishing in local beels. Losing access to these bodies of water and other resources that now fall within the protected area put already impoverished people under further strain, and led to widespread resentment.On top of that, public distrust of forest officials is widespread in Assam. High-profile cases of corruption among rangers and forest officials are well known among the locals.An investigation that appears to probe only local groups like fishers and settlers while ignoring the possibility of official corruption could deepen this distrust and aggravate community-conservation conflict, they say. “Therefore, the matter needs to be handled cautiously so that those who are responsible for the rhino’s death are brought to book and at the same time the community relations aren’t negatively affected,” Borkataky says.“A single blot can overshadow the unrelenting hard work of hundreds of rangers working day in and day out to protect the rhino in the state’s four protected rhino habitats,” Nath says. “That’s why we are demanding a fair investigation that is unencumbered by the baggage of politics.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Featured, Mammals, One-horned Rhinos, Poaching, Protected Areas, Rhinos, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

Posted in gntmurcj

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer A recent study estimates the impacts of implementing a soy moratorium in the Cerrado savanna, Brazil’s second largest biome, which has already lost half of its native vegetation to agribusiness, much of it due to soy and cattle expansion.The Amazon Soy Moratorium, seen as one of the most successful voluntary corporate conservation agreements ever, was implemented in the Amazon biome in 2006, and helped greatly reduce deforestation from soy there.Now environmental NGOs and international retailers have called for a similar moratorium in the Cerrado, the biodiverse tropical savanna that borders the Amazon on its south and east.Full participation by the private sector in a Cerrado Soy Moratorium starting in 2021 — including resistant companies such a Cargill — could prevent 3.6 million hectares (8.9 million acres) of native vegetation being lost due to soy expansion, an area larger than Belgium, researchers found. Brazil’s Cerrado savvanna is being rapidly converted to soy and other crops. Many environmentalists think one solution would be a soy moratorium like the one put in place in the Amazon in 2006. Image courtesy of Visualhunt.comBy 2006, deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon due to expanding soy production had raised a loud alarm among the public and with environmental groups. Led by Greenpeace, NGOs joined with retailers such as McDonalds, and soy traders like Cargill and Bunge, along with farmers and the Brazilian government, to create the Amazon Soy Moratorium, whereby traders agreed not to buy from producers who were newly deforesting land to grow soy. The resulting agreement is considered by many to be one of the most successful corporate voluntary conservation initiatives ever.Today, concern is again on the rise over soy deforestation, but this time it is directed at a biome neighboring the Amazon known as the Cerrado, a uniquely biodiverse tropical savanna where many of Brazil’s soy producing states are located.This concern has led environmental NGOs and international retailers like Wal-Mart and McDonalds to propose the Cerrado Manifesto, modeled after the successful Amazon Soy Moratorium. But implementing this new soy agreement hinges on cooperation from transnational soy traders like Cargill — who have signaled their reluctance to sign on, even as they acknowledge the precariousness of the savanna’s survivalNow a new study, the first of its kind — conducted by an international group of researchers led by Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE), and published in Science Advances — has used modeling to put a number on exactly how much native vegetation conversion could be averted by expanding the Amazon Soy Moratorium into Brazil’s species-rich savanna.Avoided direct conversion from native vegetation to soy under A) a scenario where just the Brazilian Forest Code is applied, and B) with a soy moratorium expanded to the Cerrado. Matopiba region is in green and color bar values are in thousands of hectares per cell. Republished from Science advances with permission.Quantifying native vegetation conversion“The soy moratorium was effective for the Amazon. We wanted to know what the impacts would be of expanding this [agreement] to the Cerrado, both because the Cerrado is an important biodiversity hotspot and important for food production, but also because the Cerrado is under threat of extinction,” Aline Soterroni, one of the study lead authors told Mongabay.Currently less than 20 percent of undisturbed Cerrado vegetation remains. The new research modeled the impact of extending the moratorium to the savanna by looking at future soy expansion in Brazil under scenarios with and without a moratorium. The researchers also estimated which of the six major soy traders and world markets are expected to contribute most to future native vegetation conversion in the Cerrado.The team found that an area the size of Mississippi could ultimately be converted to soy in Brazil by 2050. Less than 10 percent of that conversion would likely happen in the Amazon, while the Cerrado would be burdened by most of the growth, with 10.8 million hectares (26.7 million acres) of new soy fields created.However, if a soy moratorium were extended to the Cerrado starting in 2021, the researchers suggest that it could prevent 3.6 million hectares (8.9 million acres) of native vegetation loss due to soy expansion — an area larger than Belgium.A conservation achievement of that size would do more than preserve a globally unique biodiversity hotspot. The Cerrado is also home to some of Brazil’s most important watersheds, and stores a significant amount of carbon in its complex underground savanna root system, helping curb climate change.Soybean expansion by land use class. FC scenario considers full implementation of the Brazilian Forest Code, and the SoyM scenario considers expansion of the soy moratorium to the Cerrado. Republished from Science advances with permission.Saving the last of the Cerrado Carlos Antonio Da Silva Junior, a Professor of Remote Sensing at the State University of Mato Grosso who wasn’t involved with the research, told Mongabay that the alarming deforestation data highlighted by the new study touches on critical points related to biodiversity conservation in the Cerrado.Estimates suggest that around half of the Cerrado biome has already been converted to agriculture. Of the remaining savanna that hasn’t been converted, less than 20 percent is still undisturbed — the conversion of which to soy would be a major threat to the more than 4,800 plant and vertebrate species that could go extinct.A large portion of the remaining intact native vegetation is located in Matopiba — a region consisting of 337 municipalities spanning four savanna states, including MAranhão, TOcantins, PIauí and BAhia. Between 2000 and 2014, land conversion to soy in Matopiba increased 253 percent. And according to the study, this rapid rate of native vegetation-to-soy conversion isn’t likely to slow anytime soon. Without a soy moratorium, 86 percent of soy expansion in the Cerrado is projected to come from the Matopiba region.The researchers also found that, even though China is the largest market for soy in the world, the relative risk of future native vegetation conversion driven by either China or the European Union (EU) are pretty much the same. “That is because the EU sources more from the Matopiba region, whereas China buys from everywhere.” says Sotteroni. “With the EU / MERCOSUR trade deal on the table, this point becomes especially relevant.” MERCOSUR is the Latin American trade bloc, of which Brazil is the largest member; the EU / MERCOSUR trade deal agreed to this summer has yet to be ratified, and could be threatened by Brazil’s rising levels of deforestation.Tractors clearing the Cerrado. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.Soy moratorium only part of the solutionThe study authors point out that even though a soy moratorium would conserve a significant amount of native vegetation, it would not stop deforestation and the conversion of native vegetation on its own.“The expansion of the [moratorium] to the Cerrado is necessary, but it is not, by itself, sufficient to protect the biodiversity and ecosystem services of this biome,” the scientists wrote.  Compliance with Brazil’s Forest Code, which determines how much native vegetation must legally be conserved — along with implementation of other public policies that govern crops along with cattle pasture — are extremely relevant to conservation success. However, under the agribusiness friendly, and environmentally hostile, administration of President Jair Bolsonaro, the possibility of currently carrying out ecologically sound policies seems remote.Experts like Da Silva agree, and previous studies have shown, that there is enough degraded pasture in Brazil to absorb the demand for soy expansion, without harming native vegetation. “Grain production areas in Brazil should be expanded into areas that are [already] degraded with pastures,“ he writes, adding that innovative techniques such as Crop-Livestock-Forest Integration already exist and can create sustainable and profitable production.For the paper’s authors, the biggest takeaway from their study is the outsized role that the private sector could play in protecting the last undisturbed intact remnants of the Cerrado, should transnational commodities companies commit to a moratorium.“When governance is weak, supply chains and voluntary agreements become more important,” says Sotteroni. “We have an effective soy moratorium in the Amazon that is already developed and working. Given the [current] political situation, expanding the soy moratorium is the right action now to conserve the Cerrado.”Citation:Soterroni, Aline C., et al. “Expanding the Soy Moratorium to Brazil’s Cerrado.” Science advances 5.7 (2019): eaav7336.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Aerial view of a recently cleared section of the Brazilian Cerrado savanna. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.center_img Agriculture, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Soy, Tropical Deforestation, Zero Deforestation Commitments last_img read more

Posted in kirlkiav

first_imgArticle published by Willie Shubert Climate Activism, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Climate Politics, Human Rights, United Nations Youth activists taking part in the global climate strike have underscored the urgency of taking meaningful action to mitigate the environmental and humanitarian disasters posed by the climate crisis.Many low-lying territories in Asia and the Pacific are already struggling with rising sea levels, posing a major challenge for governments dealing with unprecedented levels of internal displacement.The activists have also filed a petition with the U.N. Human Rights Commission, seeking to hold polluters accountable for the human rights violations arising from the climate crisis.They also want to countries like the Philippines, one of those considered most vulnerable to climate change impacts, to fight harder for justice from richer, more polluting countries. NEW YORK CITY — Climate change continues to pose an existential threat to many low-lying Asian and the Pacific island countries, with rising seas putting people’s lives, livelihoods, environment and culture at risk. At a more extreme level, some communities are already being relocated because of rising oceans, making movements across borders a worrisome reality of the future for many people, especially the young generation.“Our existence is at stake. The consequences of a burning planet is coming and is already felt in many parts of the world by our people,” said Lavetanalagi Seru, coordinator of the Fiji-based Alliance for Future Generations. “We are on a suicidal [course] and we need to act courageously, urgently and boldly. And that human rights should underpin the actions we take.”Seru was among thousands of protesters, many of them youths like himself, gathered in New York on Sept. 20 for a global climate strike to highlight the urgency of tackling climate change. Having arrived from his village in Fiji, Seru brought the dire message that some islands have already been submerged completely and that more people will be forced to move in the coming years, which will pose a massive challenge for regional governments in terms of dealing with internal displacement.“Young people have certainly realized the gravity of the climate catastrophe, and the possibility of inheriting an inhabitable planet. We share our frustrations of the lack of political will and climate inaction from our leaders and from our governments. Let us rise to the challenge … or we shall be judged by a jury that is yet to be born,” he said.In 2016 Hurricane Winston, a category 5 storm, battered this school in Tailevu Province, Fiji. Image by Australian Department of Foreign Affairs via Flickr.At the protest in New York, one of a series that took place in 150 cities around the world that same day, the young protesters chanted “this is what democracy looks like” and “climate justice now.” Children and adults alike carried banners and placards as they marched in unison along the streets of New York. The mass protest evolved from a solitary show of defiance by Swedish student Greta Thunberg  two years ago, and hit a high this week ahead of the United Nations climate summit in New York.“We are yet not done. We are just getting started,” said Alexandria Villaseñor, co-founder of US Youth Climate Strike. “For the past year, the youth has become the moral voice on the climate crisis, urging adults and world leaders to listen to scientists and take action for as long as it takes. The future of our generation and all humanity is at stake. And we will not stop until we will have one.”In October last year, the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCCC) released a stark warning that the world needs to make a rapid and deep cut in greenhouse gas emissions to hold global warming to a maximum of 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) over the pre-industrial baseline.Villaseñor said young people were demanding that world leaders and governments attending the U.N. climate summit respond to their pleas to stop all fossil fuel infrastructure projects globally and transition to a 100 percent renewable energy economy. They are also demanding that polluters be held accountable for the damage they are causing to the planet.“We are expecting world leaders to take bold climate action in order to give us the stable climate system that is our right as young people and as the generation that will be affected by the climate crisis,” Villaseñor said. “If our demands are not met at the U.N. Climate Summit, we are coming back again, larger and fiercer each time.”Speaking before more than 250,000 people who joined the march in New York, Thunberg said young people will spearhead the pressure on governments to address the public demands to address the climate crisis.“This is an emergency. Our house is on fire,” she told the crowd at Battery Park in Manhattan. “It is not just the young people’s house. We all live here and it affects all of us. We will not just stand aside and watch.”Demonstrators at the New York City Climate Strike in September 2019. Image by Imelda Abano for Mongabay.NGO supportVarious environmental and human rights organizations have also supported the youth-led massive march for climate action.Naderev “Yeb” Saño, executive director of Greenpeace Southeast Asia, called the climate strike a demonstration of the collective indignation of peoples and movements around the world, buoyed by fresh energy from the world’s children and youths clamoring for climate justice and ambitious action.“The strikes represent the will of the people,” he said, “and as we lose faith in our political and business leaders, we gain hope and inspiration that the people will rise up and make another world possible, and we will be unstoppable.”Saño cited the example of the Philippines, which this past week filed a petition with the U.N. Commission on Human Rights to hold big polluters accountable for the human rights implications of the climate crisis. He said the final memorandum filed with the commission summarizes the scientific and legal evidence about how carbon majors have contributed significantly to climate change and human rights impacts.“It will show how the fossil fuel industry misled and deceived the public on the science and the climate harms these have caused and continue to cause the Filipinos,” Saño added.Leon Dulce, national coordinator of the Kalikasan People’s Network for the Environment, a Philippine NGO, said the lack of political will from governments to address climate change is bizarre.“Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, for instance, must immediately declare a ‘climate emergency’ that would expedite a comprehensive climate adaptation and resiliency package that will subsidize our farmers, workers and marginalized communities for long-term ecosystems protection and restoration, disaster risk reduction, and economic and social protection,” Dulce said.He added such a declaration must also lay out a master plan for a just transition toward renewable energy and national industrialization based on people’s needs, as well as put in place a mechanism for international advocacy to call on top climate-polluting countries and corporations to commit to deep and drastic emissions cuts and adaptation fund pledges.“As a consistently top climate-vulnerable nation, the Philippine government is not doing enough to keep us afloat in the deluge of climate crisis,” Dulce said.Philip Alston, co-chair of New York University’s Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, said “human rights will be rendered increasingly meaningless unless we act immediately.”“Climate change has been called a ‘false alarm’ but it is an alarm that will end up killing many of our children, and at least some of us,” Alston said. “The future disasters flowing from climate change are moving from possibilities to certainties.”This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Posted in kirlkiav