first_imgHyundai Heavy exits polysilicon businessThe Korean conglomerate Hyundai Heavy Industries has withdrawn its shares from the joint venture Korean Advanced Materials, which manufactures polysilicon, according to a local media report. The sustained downturn in the photovoltaic industry has been blamed for the decision. May 13, 2013 Sandra Enkhardt Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share Hyundai Heavy Industries has pulled back from the polysilicon manufacturing business. The company has transferred its 49% stake in Korean Advanced Materials to the KCC Group for free, according to a recent report published by “Korea IT Times”. KCC Group and Hyundai Heavy had founded the joint venture Korean Advanced Materials in 2008. The sustained downturn in the photovoltaic industry has been blamed for the decision. The KCC Group will take over the polysilicon manufacturer as a 100% subsidiary, the report said. After Hyundai Heavy Industries’ gratis retirement of stocks from Korean Advanced Materials, the company has lost €83 million. Both companies had originally invested twice as much money in the joint venture. At the end of 2012, Korean Advanced Materials had total debt of more than €130 million. In the future, the firm will continue to operate its photovoltaic module manufacturing plant in Eumseong, Chungbuk province, a company official told the Korean news portal. Translated by Vera von Kreutzbruck.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. 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The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. 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Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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first_imgIt’s highly worrisome to learn that the national capital of Delhi continues to be in the severe grip of Covid-19. What could explain its overall tally of over 36,000 coronavirus positive cases with the detection of as many as 2,137 corona infected cases along with 71 unfortunate deaths taking place during the last 24 hours? However, it was highly intriguing to gather that of the total 4,344 corona beds earmarked in five Delhi govt hospitals, nearly 3,000 beds are presently lying vacant as against near ‘full occupancy’ in their private counterparts.While no specific reasons may be assigned to such a low occupancy in these hospitals but the national TV news channels are sadly abuzz with some highly disturbing reports indicating very poor show concerning the initial admission of corona patients, the subsequent shoddy treatment being accorded to the patients admitted therein as also the non-timely removal of the corpses of the unfortunate deceased ones.The worst case for example could be the city’s LNJP Hospital if one truly believes the extremely disturbing videos that were shown by a few TV channels? For sure, such a shameful and deplorable situation could never have been imagined in Delhi. No wonders if the hon’ble SC has reportedly asked the Delhi government and the LNJP Hospital to explain the position?But the moot question obviously arises here: Why the situation was being allowed to reach such an unimaginable pass? Why there has been no ‘monitoring’ of the actual functioning of its own hospitals by the Delhi government even as lots of complaints have been pouring in from the affected patients and their relatives? While as per media reports, a team of the NHRC officials had also recently visited but its findings are yet to be put in the public domain.Reasonably speaking, Delhi’s health minister should himself urgently visit (of course, incognito) all the ‘trouble-spots’ so as to have the ‘first-hand information’ about their actual state of affairs at ground zero as the image of the Delhi government is also at stake now. However, one genuinely hopes that, with the ‘intervention’ of the apex court, things would soon improve in all poorly shaped govt hospitals in Delhi.Let us always keep in mind that each and every human life is equally precious and there is no room for any complacency at all. Last but not the least, our learned political masters should jointly fight the growing menace of coronavirus instead of finding faults with each other, endlessly playing the blame game as also publicly fighting among themselves, thereby leaving the general masses completely stunned. God save India!“Prevention is always better than cure”. Play safe, stay safe!last_img read more

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first_img Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! Email* We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. Equestrian Canada (EC) is pleased to announce the selection of Jean Duckering of Red Deer, AB as the December 2017 recipient of the Dressage Volunteer of the Month Award.For over three decades, Duckering has been a strong supporter of Canadian dressage. In 1985, she joined the Parkland Area Alberta Dressage Association (PAADA) and held various board member positions, including secretary, treasurer, and an eventual 10-year tenure as president. Concurrently, she was show manager for the Alberta Equestrian Games and organized many provincial championships. Her tireless efforts made the PAADA the go-to organization for professionally run, enjoyable events.Duckering went on to become President of the Alberta Dressage Association (ADA) from 2010 to 2012, where she played a key role in managing the ADA’s annual casino fundraising event. She also worked for many years as a dressage advisor for the Mane Event in Red Deer, AB.Duckering has been an active EC volunteer since 2014 and is currently a member of the Dressage Committee, lending her voice to help direct the development of dressage programs and services nationwide.“I have enjoyed working with Jean on the Dressage Committee for the past two years,” said Joan Macartney of Manotick, ON. “Jean is a joy to work with, always striving to provide well thought-out solutions, and has contributed to dressage in a variety of roles.”Duckering enjoys competing in local shows and currently rides at Third level with her Canadian Warmblood mare, 17-year-old Rhumba, sired by Tango Selune. She is still greatly involved in Alberta’s dressage community, and helps organize the only FEI level dressage competition in Alberta, the Calgary Area/ADA Black Tie CDI 3*.EC is grateful for the energy and vision Duckering offers the dressage community with selflessness and enthusiasm. Duckering is archetypal of the dedicated volunteers who help dressage grow at both the local and national level.If you know of a volunteer who deserves recognition, nominations are quick and easy through the EC website.Nominations for the award are accepted until the 20th day of each month, making January 20th the next deadline to submit the name of a volunteer who has made a difference to the sport of dressage. Questions and comments on the Dressage Volunteer of the Month Award can be directed to Christine Peters at [email protected] Tags: Jean Duckering, Horse Sport Enews SIGN UP More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business.last_img read more

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first_imgRelated Items:marko bezjak, SC Magdeburg handball ShareTweetShare ShareEmail Marko Bezjak to join SC Magdeburg ShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsOne of the most important players of SC Magdeburg, Marko Bezjak, won’t be able to help his team-mates until the end of the season.Experienced Slovenian playmaker has injury of shooting shoulder (right) which has to be threaten surgically, which means that team from “Getec Arena” will miss him in the next six to eight months!“This will be a big trouble for us in Bundesliga and EHF Cup competition”, is written in the club’s statement. Bezjak and Weber stays in SC Magdeburg until 2017! Recommended for you Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Lemke to leave, Bezjak extends in Magdeburg Click to commentlast_img read more

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first_imgStagecoach has teamed up with social media makeup influencer Lucy Hart (or @hartyyy to Instagram users) to show passengers how to achieve their best look as mandatory face mask rules come into force.Lucy and the bus company have put together a tutorial which shows customers how to ensure makeup is not disturbed when wearing and removing face masks. The Manchester-based influencer is shown travelling on a Stagecoach bus, where she also demonstrates Stagecoach services such as contactless payments and safety measures introduced to public transport.Lucy says she felt ‘super safe’ on the bus, and believes face masks are ‘a respectful element that allows you to feel safer’.Stagecoach Regional Director North Catherine Acton-Brazier says: “We know that people will want to look their best, particularly for that important first selfie in the bar, coffee shop or shop, and with face coverings now becoming part of our normal everyday life, we wanted to give people a helping hand.“We’re really pleased to have teamed up with Lucy Hart to show how safe and easy it is to use our services, and at the same time, provide some hints and tips.“We’ve put in lots of extra measures, with enhanced daily cleaning, contactless payments, social distancing and our handy Busy Bus indicator, and people can have full confidence in travelling with us.”last_img read more

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first_imgParadise Music Festival has announced their jam-heavy 2015 lineup. The festival is held at Hustonville, KY from July 23-25, and has already dropped a great lineup for the 2015 festivities.Headlining the festival are The Werks (2x), TAUK (3x), and Twiddle (2x). They will be joined by Pigeons Playing Ping Pong (2x), Aqueous (2x), Vibe Street (3x), Ghost Owl, Peridoni (3x), Indigo Sun (3x, including a tribute to Prince), Strange Mechanics, Benchwood Wyse (3x), and Nevele.Pre-sale tickets for the three-night event are currently available.last_img read more

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first_imgFoundation of Funk, led by founding Meters members Zigaboo Modeliste and George Porter Jr., has announced a special 2019 New Year’s Eve performance. New Orleans, LA’s House of Blues will host the band’s celebratory hometown show on December 31st.Guitarist Eric Krasno and keyboardist John Medeski have been tapped as Foundation of Funk’s special guests for the New Year’s blowout. Krasno and Medeski are no strangers to the funk outfit as they most recently performed alongside Modeliste and Porter Jr. during a Jazz Fest late-night show in April.The event page notes that additional special guests will join the band for their NYE blowout.Tickets for the Foundation of Funk New Year’s Eve performance are now on sale here.Head to the event page for more information.last_img read more

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first_imgCobblestone Live has announced its lineup for 2020, featuring headliners Smash Mouth, Spin Doctors, and Aqueous.The festival, slated for July 31st–August 1st in Buffalo, NY’s Historic Cobblestone district, will also feature two nights of Andy Frasco & The U.N., Magic Beans, Haley Jane, Root Shock, Functional Flow performing a 90’s set, two nights of Witty Tarbox, Workingman’s Dead, Critt’s Juke Joint performing a 90’s grunge versus 90’s hip-hop set, PA Line, Grub, Cypher, and Grosh.Related: Colorado’s Arise Music Festival Denied Permit For 2020 EventThe third annual gathering, produced by Buffalo Iron Works and Lockhouse Distillery & Bar, will feature live music on two outdoor main stages on Columbia Street and Illinois Street, along with an indoor stage at Buffalo Iron Works, and an electronic stage at Lockhouse. Both single-day and two-day passes for Cobblestone Live, along with VIP tickets, are available now through the festival’s website.last_img read more

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first_imgVictims finally began arriving at the hospital on their own around 12:30 p.m. They were student volunteers from the Red Cross Club at Skyview High School. Skyview senior Shannon Crabtree, 17, was draped in a towel in the waiting room while waiting to be evaluated by a nurse. I feel like a victim, she said. Everyone involved goes away with a better understanding of their responsibilities, Flaherty said.Jose Paul Corona can be reached at 360-759-8038 or [email protected] PORTLAND, Ore. — Skyview High School students in bathing suits braved the elements for their country Tuesday. The scene looked like something out of a Hollywood thriller, but more subdued. Actual patients who were in the area looked confused by what was going on. The fact that everyone was calm and collected seemed to put the real patients in the waiting room at ease. After arriving, the hospital staff members tried to detect if they were contaminated with radiation. Those who were had to remove their clothes, which were then put in plastic trash bags and thrown into a storage bin. The students were prepared for the exercise and were wearing bathing suits under their clothes. The exercise is costing millions of dollars. Clark County received a federal grant of $100,000 for its part in the drill, and other local agencies that participated will be reimbursed for any cost incurred. Everyone taking part in the scenario was taking it very seriously, Williams said while decked out in hazmat gear shortly before victims arrived. The intense drill serves a real purpose. It prepares everyone who would be involved during a real terrorist attack, she said. News crews gathered at the raceway Tuesday morning and awaited the explosion. Once the bomb went off, things went as might be expected during an actual terrorist attack: slowly. Several minutes later, emergency vehicles began arriving. First-responders tended to the wounded, assessed the scene and put on hazardous material gear before searching for other bombs. Nearly 30 Vancouver Police Department officers were at the raceway and took part in the exercise. It s good to know what to do, she added. Victims with simulated wounds were led to the area around the bus several minutes after the blast. They were then scattered around the area and told to lie down on the damp grass and among damaged cars. Shortly after they were in place it began to rain. The scenario allows hospital staff to identify weak spots and problems, said Tamara Paul, a respiratory therapist who took part in the exercise. TOPOFF4 may only be a drill, but it s still nerve-wracking, he added. An Uzbek Islamic Society claimed responsibility for the blast and said two more would follow, said a report on a news Web site set up for the drill. They voluntarily stood outdoors in rainy, 50-degree weather as part of TOPOFF4, the largest anti-terrorism exercise in U.S. history. Once they were stripped of their clothes, they were given towels and then taken to a decontamination tent. Hospital employees in hazmat gear then took them inside the tents and hosed them off with warm water. They were then led into the hospital emergency room. At about 10:30 a.m., a press briefing was held at the site. Few details were readily available, which appeared to be part of the drill. Employees were told that a busload of victims from the raceway would be arriving sometime after 11 a.m., but their arrival time kept getting pushed back. Twenty Vancouver firefighters were dispatched to Southwest Washington Medical Center to help decontaminate blast victims, and some Vancouver police worked a security detail at an area shelter that was set up after the blast. Homeland Security officials along with numerous local public safety agencies, some from Clark County, took part in the local scenario. The area surrounding Portland International Raceway stood in for the Steel Bridge. Her sentiments mirrored those of hospital employees. This type of exercise allows local first responders to work with federal and area agencies who would jump into action during an actual event, said Jim Flaherty, firefighter-spokesman with the Vancouver Fire Department. I m glad we re going through the drill, said Stan Williams, an emergency room technician who volunteered for the exercise. At Legacy Salmon Creek Hospital, employees began preparing to receive some of the injured and wounded. The hospital knew it would be taking part in the drill, but it wasn t known when the call for help would come. The Department of Homeland Security organized the drill, involving more than 15,000 people who work for federal, state and local agencies. The exercise, which continues throughout the week in locations around the country, depicts the explosions of radiological dirty bombs in Guam, Phoenix and Portland, and the aftermath. After everything is over, everyone knows what they need to work on, she said. At the federal level besides Homeland Security, the Department of Defense will perform concurrent exercises related to global terrorist threats. The Department of Health and Human Services will practice dealing with health problems caused by a radiological emergency. The drill scenario: A bomb on a bus went off at 9:06 a.m. at the east end of Portland s Steel Bridge. The explosion heavily damaged the Holladay Park and Davis buildings at Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland. Twelve people were killed and 15 were injured in the blast, a hospital press release said. Radiation was widespread.last_img read more

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first_imgA new study from the University of Vermont shows that removing native forest and starting intensive agriculture can accelerate erosion so dramatically that in a few decades as much soil is lost as would naturally occur over thousands of years. Had you stood on the banks of the Roanoke, Savannah, or Chattahoochee Rivers 100 years ago, you’d have seen a lot more clay soil washing down to the sea than before European settlers began clearing trees and farming there in the 1700s. Around the world, it is well known that deforestation and agriculture increases erosion above its natural rate.But accurately measuring the natural rate of erosion for a landscape — and, therefore, how much human land use has accelerated this rate — has been a devilishly hard task for geologists. And that makes environmental decision-making — such as setting allowable amounts of sediment in fish habitat and land use regulation — also difficult.Now research on these three rivers and seven other large river basins in the US Southeast has, for the first time, precisely quantified this background rate of erosion. The scientists made a startling discovery: rates of hillslope erosion before European settlement were about an inch every 2,500 years, while during the period of peak land disturbance in the late 1800s and early 1900s, rates spiked to an inch every 25 years.“That’s more than a hundred-fold increase,” says Paul Bierman, a geologist at the University of Vermont who co-led the new study with his former graduate student and lead author Luke Reusser, and geologist Dylan Rood at Imperial College, London. “Soils fall apart when we remove vegetation,” Bierman says, “and then the land erodes quickly.”Their study was presented online Jan. 7 in the February issue of the journal Geology. Their work was supported by the National Science Foundation.Precious resource“Our study shows exactly how huge an effect European colonization and agriculture had on the landscape of North America,” says Dylan Rood. “Humans scraped off the soil more than 100 times faster than other natural processes!”Along the southern Piedmont from Virginia to Alabama — that stretch of rolling terrain between the Appalachian Mountains and the coastal plain of the Atlantic Ocean — clay soils built up for many millennia. Then, in just a few decades of intensive logging, and cotton and tobacco production, as much soil eroded as would have happened in a pre-human landscape over thousands of years, the scientists note. “The Earth doesn’t create that precious soil for crops fast enough to replenish what the humans took off,” Rood says. “It’s a pattern that is unsustainable if continued.”The scientist collected 24 sediment samples from these rivers — and then applied an innovative technique to make their measurements. From quartz in the sediment, Bierman and his team at the University of Vermont’s Cosmogenic Nuclide Laboratory extracted a rare form of the element beryllium, an isotope called beryllium-10. Formed by cosmic rays, the isotope builds up in the top few feet of the soil. The slower the rate of erosion, the longer soil is exposed at Earth’s surface, the more beryllium-10 it accumulates. Using an accelerator mass spectrometer at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the geologists measured how much beryllium-10 was in their samples — giving them a kind of clock to measure erosion over long time spans.These modern river sediments revealed rates of soil loss over tens of thousands of years. This allowed the team to compare these background rates to post-settlement rates of both upland erosion and downriver sediment yield that have been well documented since the early 1900s across this Piedmont region.While the scientists concluded that upland erosion was accelerated by a hundred-fold, the amount of sediment at the outlets of these rivers was increased only about five to ten times above pre-settlement levels, meaning that the rivers were only transporting about six percent of the eroded soil. This shows that most of the material eroded over the last two centuries still remains as “legacy sediment,” the scientists write, piled up at the base of hillslopes and along valley bottoms.“There’s a huge human thumbprint on the landscape, which makes it hard to see what nature would do on its own,” Bierman says, “but the beauty of beryllium-10 is that it allows us to see through the human fingerprint to see what’s underneath it, what came before.”“This study helps us understand how nature runs the planet,” he says, “compared to how we run the planet.”Soil conservationAnd this knowledge, in turn, can “help to inform land use planning,” Bierman says. “We can set regulatory goals based on objective data about how the landscape used to work.” Often, it is difficult to know whether conservation strategies — for example, regulations about TMDL’s (total maximum daily loads) of sediment — are well fitted to the geology and biology of a region. “In other words, an important unsolved mystery is: “How do the rates of human removal compare to ‘natural’ rates, and how sustainable are the human rates?” Rood asks.While this new study shows that erosion rates were unsustainable in the recent past, “it also provides a goal for the future,” Rood says. “We can use the beryllium-10 erosion rates as a target for successful resource conservation strategies; they can be used to develop smart environmental policies and regulations that will protect threatened soil and water resources for generations to come.”PHOTO: Hurricane Isabel flooding the Potomac River at Great Falls, Va., carrying sediment eroded from farm fields upstream (Photo credit: Paul Bierman, 2003).last_img read more

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