first_imgFull Gallery: This past weekend, Kung Fu brought their annual Toys for Tots benefit to Toad’s Place in New Haven, CT just in time for the holidays. Night one featured an incredible Curtis Mayfield cover set which saw the band joined by special guest Alan Evans of Soulive (watch the set in its entirety here). The following evening, the band welcomed funky electronic pioneers Break Science (Adam Deitch of Lettuce and Borahm Lee) for a full-blown throwdown for a good cause.Local funk act West End Blend opened and set the energy to a 12. Then Break Science took the stage to continue heating things up. Finally, Kung Fu presented their hometown with a stellar set from start to finish, complete with a guest sit-in from Johnny Durkin on percussion. All in all, this was a special evening, made even more remarkable by the number of toys and gifts the band collected for children in need at holiday time.Setlist: Kung Fu at Toad’s Place 12/19/15Chin Music, Bopcorn, Primetime Rib, Tsar Bomba, Gung Ho, Daddy D, Gold Coast, Oh Shit it’s X, Hollywood Kisses, SamuraiE: Beau Organ intro>S’all Good, Cult of PersonalityPhotos from Kung Fu & Break Science by Scott Harris (full gallery at the bottom) Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgOver a thousand people crowded into the Memorial Church Sunday (Nov. 11) for a special birthday. Seventy-five years earlier, almost to the minute, the Colonial-style structure was dedicated on Armistice Day 1932.“This is a festive and happy day for us,” said the Rev. Professor Peter J. Gomes, the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church, who in 1982 had presided over the celebration of the church’s 50th anniversary. It was a time to acknowledge all of Harvard’s dead from 20th century wars, he said, and to celebrate the living as “a beloved community of memory and hope.”“The silent sound of prayer and the active sound of music are always here,” said Gomes of the building, with its high white pews, rich woods, and vaulted ceilings. “This is no mere war memorial.”Celebrations stretched over nearly four hours, beginning with a church service commemorating both the war dead and the benefactors to the high-columned structure.Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick ‘78, J.D. ’82, a member of the Memorial Church congregation, quoted “two philosophers.” Reinhold Niebuhr was one. The other was his grandmother, whose slum-bound rose garden on Chicago’s South Side has remained his inspiration.In the 1950s and 1960s, adults in his broken, impoverished neighborhood “treated [children] as if they had a stake in us,” said Patrick. “They understood how to tend their garden.”He praised Gomes for tending the “garden” that is the Memorial Church.The service featured the world premiere of “The Litany of Light,” an anthem commissioned for the anniversary celebration and composed by Carson P. Cooman ‘04, now an instructor in Harvard’s Department of Music. A line from the libretto, by Elizabeth Kirschner, summed up the day’s duality of somber remembrance and fundamental cheer: “Joy may wander but never leave.”The Harvard University Choir sang throughout the day, and a lush musical prelude featured the Riverside Brass Quintet.Afterwards, celebrants walked out through the Memorial Room — “the heart of the church,” said Gomes. A fresh green wreath had just been placed there by an honor guard of cadets from Harvard’s Reserve Officer Training Corps program.In the sharp chill of early afternoon, the crowd gathered on the wide granite steps of the South Porch. Led by a bagpiper, they formed a wending, slow procession from the church — “a motley crew in procession, meant to be noticed,” said Gomes.At the grassy Delta in front of the Science Center a large tent awaited, where about 500 guests ate salmon and drank champagne from fluted glasses. Gomes and Harvard President Drew Faust made remarks in celebration of the occasion, and former University Marshal Richard M. Hunt was chairman of the day.Behind the podium was a wall of enlarged photos showing famous visitors to the Memorial Church through the years, including Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela.History was at the core of the afternoon remarks.The Memorial Church was built with donations from alumni to commemorate those from the University family who had fallen during World War I. “Here at Harvard, the war cast a long shadow,” said Gomes.During the 1914-18 conflict, Harvard sent 11,319 to fight; 375 died in the Allied cause, including three faculty members. Three died fighting for the German side.By the fall of 1918, enrollment at Harvard College shrank to 20 percent of its usual size, and the campus itself was transformed into “an armed camp,” said Faust, who is also Lincoln Professor of History. Nearly all remaining undergraduates belonged to student army training camps.In those days, “the war had been deeply felt in the day-to-day experience of Harvard University,” said Faust. Building the Memorial Church was an attempt to cope with fresh memories, she said — part of a worldwide struggle to understand what was known as the Great War, which occasioned 70,000 memorials in England alone.“The Memorial Church stands in the tradition of trying to reinvent humanity in a world that had seemed to lose sight of it,” said Faust.The grand church was designed to counterbalance the scale and grandeur of Widener Library across the New Yard. But it was unique among memorials of that era, meant to be “a living institution,” said Faust, where the energetic civic and religious business of a university community could unfold. “What better way to honor the dead,” she remarked, “than to place them at the heart of the living?”As for the future, said Gomes from the tent’s low wooden stage, “we have a very specific adventure in store” — refurbishing projects that over the next two or three years will cost $6 million.Appleton Chapel will be opened up to restore it to the “bowl of light” it once was, he said.Both the chapel and the gallery will be fitted for two new Charles B. Fisk organs. And the pulpit will be relocated to underneath windows where it was before 1968.“Needless to say, dear friends, you will all hear more,” said Gomes to the gathering, in one of the day’s many lighthearted calls for more church benefactors. “This might well be the most expensive free lunch you ever had.”last_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_img(United States Fire Administration) The SBA will forgive loans under this program if certain conditions are met. Private for-profit companies and private non-profit EMS agencies (including tribal ambulance services) are eligible. The maximum amount available to borrow under this program is 2.5 times average total monthly payroll costs, not to exceed $10 million. The Paycheck Protection Program was created by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act). It is a loan program administered by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) to incentivize small businesses to keep workers on the payroll. FEMA Public Assistance Grant Program How to submit an applicationDownload public assistance application A prominent way your department can obtain fiscal support is through the FEMA Public Assistance Grant Program. FEMA has implemented a streamlined project application process for COVID-19 cost recovery. This process eases the burden for organizations providing services during this crisis. Supporting documentation is still required. Read More United States Fire Administration Paycheck Protection Program Please refer to the FEMA Public Assistance Program and Policy Guide for detailed guidance on eligibility, cost reimbursement and documentation requirements. There are two ways through which your agency can obtain fiscal support: the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Public Assistance Grant Program and the Paycheck Protection Program. Complete and submit this project application online in the FEMA Public Assistance Grants Portal. FEMA will not accept paper submissions of this project application. The application is being provided to applicants and recipients in paper form here to provide guidance on what information FEMA will require from applicants if they seek reimbursement for COVID-19 related activities. The U.S. Fire Administration is committed to supporting community fire and EMS during this significant event. Please visit our COVID-19 resource page for updates.last_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgSaint Mary’s President Jan Cervelli spoke Monday about the importance and necessity of sustainability in the world today.Cervelli spoke on Pope Francis’s encyclical Laudato si’ and said the Pope did a great job explaining the complexity of environmental issues.  “I think Francis hits on the head that many of the problems we see today around sustainability are not simple, they are multi-dimensional,” Cervelli said.Cervelli said the issue of environmental conservation is much more than just the environment and that it affects so many other aspects of our lives. “The first part about environmental, economic and social ecology is how they’re all interconnected. We can’t look at them separately,” Cervelli said.Cervelli said colleges like Saint Mary’s can take steps towards dealing with sustainability issues by thinking of academics as integrated learning spaces and looking at the issues as issues of social justice.  “I have some hopes and dreams for the college and for all of you, and to think about academic programs that take this approach solving problems,” Cervelli said. “It’s not just the environment, it’s dealing with the social justice dimensions as well that we’re so passionate about at Saint Mary’s.”Cervelli said that progress can only happen once people share information and communicate with each other, no matter the field. “Many of our problems today follow the fragmentation of knowledge and the isolation of bits of information [that] can actually become a form of ignorance,” Cervelli said. “So many of you are studying in very fine departments with very fine faculty; one of our goals is to work across departments, and be able to talk from science over to humanities.”Cervelli spoke about one of her personal heroes, landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. Olmsted designed Central Park in New York City and Cervelli said he put parks in cities because it made the cities more livable. “He had a strong belief, as does Pope Francis, in the healing power of nature. It’s the unconscious reflecting, it’s that ability to escape,” she said. “He believed it’s one of the more important responsibilities of the government to provide these spaces.”Cervelli said that Olmsted and Pope Francis are similar in their beliefs for the importance of the common good. “Francis talks a lot about human health and wellness and how it comes out of the environment, but what comes out of it are human interactions, with each other, socially,” Cervelli said. “Frederick Law Olmsted believed back in 1852 that nature has a direct impact on healing of humans.”Cervelli said Americans should be very proud that the first idea of a national park was born in the United States.  “That spawned the conservation movement,” Cervelli said. “And I’m afraid often times it’s not even taught in schools. The ideas of land conservation, and perpetuity for everyone and to protect our environment [and] essentially ourselves.”Tags: cervelli, conservation, president, sustainabilitylast_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgGW Plastics Inc,GW Silicones has announced the completion of its new facility at the GW Plastics Technical Campus in Royalton, Vermont. The $3.5 million expansion, which began in the fall of 2011, includes a 15,000-square-foot expansion that is scalable to 25,000 square feet. The new state-of-the-art Liquid Silicone Rubber (LSR) molding and assembly facility is capable of supporting up to 18 new injection machines and features an ISO Class 8 cleanroom along with expanded office, engineering and conference space.‘Our customers are increasingly looking to silicone as an alternative to thermoplastic because of its unique biocompatibility and performance attributes ‘it is odorless, tasteless, stainless, bacteria-resistant, easy to clean and sterilize, and works extremely well in complex injection molding applications with extremely fine detail and very tight tolerances,’explains Terri Marion, GW Silicones Business Development Manager. ‘The expansion of GW Silicones reflects our commitment to meeting our customers’growing demand for cutting-edge silicone applications in the medical device/healthcare and automotive markets.’GW Silicones, a division of GW Plastics (http://www.gwplastics.com/en(link is external)), delivers cost-effective solutions for the complex molding and manufacture of liquid silicone rubber (LSR) and unique multi-material components and assemblies to the medical device/healthcare market. GW Silicones specializes in product design and development, in-house precision tooling, and scientific injection molding along with a variety of contract manufacturing services. ‘With the recent expansion of our manufacturing facility in Royalton, VT, we can now offer improved production scalability along with our world class speed to market, quality and delivery,’said Mark Hammond, General Manager of GW Silicones. Royalton, VT, USA – July 24, 2012last_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgCommunity Bank NA,Left to right: Green Mountain Animal Defenders Walk Coordinator Jenn Piette, Community Bank N.A. New England District Manager Erika Baldasaro, Green Mountain Animal Defenders volunteer Jessica Langton, Green Mountain Animal Defenders Board President Sharon MacNair, Community Bank N.A. New England Regional Manager Anita Bourgeois and Community Bank N.A. Branch Manager Jonathan Roddy.Vermont Business Magazine Community Bank NA recently presented Burliington’s Green Mountain Animal Defenders with a $1,000 donation to sponsor the organization’s annual Walk for All Animals. All funds raised from the walk will help rescue, protect and provide direct services to pets, wildlife, farm animals and animals of all types in the Burlington region. Green Mountain Animal Defenders is Vermont’s oldest and largest volunteer-run animal protection organization. It provides a variety of services, including food, spay/neuter assistance, transportation, education and wildlife rescue. For more information, visit greenmountainanimaldefenders.org(link is external).About Community Bank System Inc. Community Bank System Inc. operates more than 230 customer facilities across Upstate New York, Northeastern Pennsylvania, Vermont and Western Massachusetts through its banking subsidiary, Community Bank N.A. With more than $10 billion in assets, the DeWitt, New York-headquartered company is among the country’s 150 largest financial institutions. In addition to a full range of retail and business banking services, the company offers comprehensive financial planning, insurance and wealth management services. Community Bank System Inc. subsidiaries/business units include OneGroup NY Inc., which provides risk management and commercial insurance, employee benefits and personal lines insurance; Community Bank Wealth Management, which provides investment advisory, personal trust and financial planning services, as well as personal, business and nonprofit portfolio design; and Benefit Plans Administrative Services Inc., which provides actuarial, retirement and VEBA/HRA plan administration, and collective investment fund, employee benefit trust and transfer agency services.Community Bank System Inc. is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and the company’s stock trades under the symbol “CBU.” For more information about Community Bank, visit communitybankna.com(link is external) or ir.communitybanksystem.com(link is external).Source: Community Bank,Yeslast_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgStephanie Lindquist-Johnson and her son, Phillip Johnson, are building cat shelters out of styrofoam coolers.It’s been a particularly long and harsh winter. Intermittent snowstorms mixed with the occasional warm bout of weather have weighed on Stephanie Lindquist-Johnson’s mind. That’s why the Roeland Park resident has been busy all winter building shelters for feral and outdoor cats around the Kansas City metro area.“Every year, I always worry; I feel so sorry for the animals out in the cold. They don’t have anywhere to go,” Lindquist-Johnson said. “So it’s important now to make these just because I know there are so many that don’t have shelter.”The shelters are made from styrofoam coolers. Lindquist-Johnson cuts a cat-sized hole into each one, places cardboard and straw at the bottom, wraps the cooler in black plastic (to keep the elements out and also to conceal the shelter) and tapes it with sturdy black tape. She also adds additional padding to the bottom of some of the coolers to get them off the ground.“It’s very durable; it will last a really long time,” she said.She first got the idea in October from Sandy Siecgrist, a local resident who stays connected on animal rescue Facebook pages. Siecgrist had given her a makeshift shelter for a feral cat, inspiring her to start making as many shelters as possible and distributing them where needed.Then in November 2018, Lindquist-Johnson posted on Nextdoor, a social networking application connecting neighbors, about her plans and the need for materials.“I knew the holidays were coming up, and a lot of people have these (coolers) in their garage just laying around; they just don’t want to throw them away,” she said.After the media attention she garnered earlier this year from an article in the Kansas City Star, the donations have been pouring in. Lindquist-Johnson said she is grateful for the donations from local residents, organizations and businesses who have provided her with dozens of coolers, plenty of materials and $580 in monetary donations. Her husband, Shane Johnson, has provided materials as well.How to make a cat shelterEach cat shelter is made with a styrofoam cooler, black plastic and black tape, plus bedding made with cardboard and straw.Each one takes less than an hour to make. Their 5-year-old son, Phillip Johnson, also helps make the shelters. So far, they have made 54 cooler-shelters and distributed almost all of them out into the community. They will continue making the cooler shelters throughout the winter. The best kind of shelters are about a foot to a foot-and-a-half in length, but she even takes large coolers and cuts them in half to make two smaller cat homes.“You want them fairly small so the cat’s body heat heats up inside,” she said. “If they have a lot of space, it’s going to be harder to keep warm.”Lindquist-Johnson said they hope to continue connecting the needs of stray cats with resources from people who want to help.“A lot of people worry and they just don’t know what to do,” she said, adding that people have reached out to her on Nextdoor and Facebook requesting a shelter for a stray or feral cat. “That makes me feel good. People do care; they want to help. Maybe they just don’t have the tools, supplies or resources to get it done.“This is our passion; we love to do this and it makes us feel good that we’re contributing back out to the community.”last_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_img“He is just very confident, but he might not play his greatest every day, but I think his confidence helps me and him and I know what we have to do and what it takes to win,” Spec said.Corwin played all of last year in the No. 2 spot, going 16-11. His sophomore year, he was struggling with a wrist injury and did not play up to his ability, he said. Corwin went 6-11 that spring.However, in his freshman year, Corwin went 28-6 in singles and 25-7 in doubles. His singles match against Northwestern clinched the Gophers their first regular season title since 1995.He takes that experience with him and understand what it takes to win big matches.“When we beat Northwestern, I can’t stop thinking of those matches whenever we talk about intense excitement,” Corwin said.Corwin has big matches ahead of him on Friday night when the No. 2 team in the country visits the Baseline Tennis Center. The Gophers will face Ohio State (16-2, 3-0) in a battle of two ranked teams. Minnesota enters that duel ranked 33 in the nation.Ohio State has three ranked players, including the No. 4 ranked player in the nation, Mikael Torpegaard. The Buckeyes have played against 11 ranked teams and have only twice lost — once to No. 7 UCLA, another time to No. 21 Georgia.Barring an unexpected circumstance, Corwin will be asked to face Torpegaard, who is 8-2 in the No. 1 singles position for the Buckeyes and 4-1 in the No. 2 spot this season.“We are just going to be locked in and whatever happens in years past, it won’t make a difference,” Corwin said. Felix Corwin excels after taking over the No. 1 singles spotThe senior is 8-1 since moving to the top singles position.Jack Rodgers, Daily File PhotoSenior Felix Corwin returns the ball during his singles match against the University of Pennsylvania at the Baseline Tennis Center on Sunday, Feb. 25. Max BiegertMarch 29, 2018Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintSince Feb. 10, senior Felix Corwin has gone 8-1 in the No. 1 singles position for the Gophers. Corwin, who started the season playing in the No. 2 spot, is now ranked No. 93 by ITA after starting unranked. He, along with fellow senior Matic Spec, are ranked No. 78 in doubles competition.The move took place when sophomore Stefan Milicevic went down with a leg injury in February. Head coach Geoff Young said that once Corwin moved into the position and continued to win, there was no reason for him to leave that spot.“There [are] three guys that can play that position, but when [Milicevic] went down and we put [Corwin] there … it is pretty obvious to leave him be,” Young said.It has not been an easy road to 8-1 for Corwin this season, having to play multiple ranked players.In a weekend in early March, Corwin took down then-No. 73 Jake Douglas from Washington in straight sets and then followed that up with a victory over Portland’s then-No. 36 Michail Pervolarakis. In his eight victories as the No. 1 singles player, Corwin has only had to go into the third set twice.“I’m taking every point with a grain of salt. I haven’t really been too worried with any specific match,” Corwin said. “I am just working on what I want to work on, and I just want to take how I’m playing and turn it into momentum for bigger matches to come.”Corwin and Spec are the only seniors on the team and they have been paired up in doubles since their sophomore year. They have roomed together all four years at Minnesota. The duo is 7-4 and in the No. 1 spot for doubles this season.Spec said he and Corwin like to feed off each other and he has been inspired by the play of his doubles partner and roommate.last_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgRob Apodaca POLITICAL News:SANTA FE – Today, Democrat Rob Apodaca announced that he is suspending his bid for Congress in New Mexico’s 3rd Congressional District.He made the following statement:“I very much want to thank my family, friends and supporters for all of their encouragement over the past few months. I decided to run for Congress with one goal in mind – to help the people and our communities of northern New Mexico. I love this state and I especially love this district. It has been an honor to be supported by the many people who have stood behind me and I owe so much to them and the people of this district. I had hoped that my work would continue in Congress, but unfortunately that cannot happen at this time.“One of the most sacred and core beliefs that is shared by much of the 3rd District is that family should be valued above all else. With my brother Benjie recently passing, now is a time that my family must come first. I have every intention of continuing to work with the communities of the north and look forward to continued engagement throughout the State. Together, we will work to ensure that our communities prosper and that our core values of hard work, family first and thriving communities remains intact for our children and for generations to come.”last_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Posted in cnflqjnk