first_img Top Searches Top Searches Covid 19WinchDakota HomeObituariesBarbara Jo Downing Barbara Jo DowningSeptember 14, 2020Mark CarpenterObituaries0 Powered By 10 Sec Best Carrot Cake Ever NextStay Best Carrot Cake EverNOW PLAYINGMama’s Deviled EggsNOW PLAYINGParmesan Baked Pork ChopsNOW PLAYINGHow to Chop an Onion PerfectlyNOW PLAYING5 Easy and Delicious Crock Pot Meatball Appetizer RecipesNOW PLAYINGCream Cheese Cake Mix CookiesNOW PLAYINGHow to Make the Ultimate Light and Fluffy Mashed PotatoesNOW PLAYINGSweet Alabama PecanbreadNOW PLAYINGOld Fashioned Soft and Buttery Yeast RollsNOW PLAYINGPumpkin Cream Cheese BarsNOW PLAYINGHow to Slice & Mince Vegetables Like a ProNOW PLAYINGHow to Knead DoughNOW PLAYINGPerfect Bacon Every TimeNOW PLAYINGHow to Peel Hard Boiled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Chill a Drink in 2 MinutesNOW PLAYINGHow to Peel TomatoesNOW PLAYINGHow to Cook Scrambled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Melt and Soften ButterNOW PLAYINGHow to Core and Slice a PineappleNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Stainless Steel SinksNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Garbage DisposalsNOW PLAYINGHow to Quarter a ChickenNOW PLAYINGSlow Cooker/Crock Pot HintsNOW PLAYINGHow to Use a Meat ThermometerNOW PLAYINGHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersNOW PLAYING Arrow Left #1 Icon Created with Sketch. Arrow right #1 Icon Created with Sketch. PreviousNellie LongNextRosalee Bowman Around the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterThis Weird Method Can Restore Your Vision Naturally (Watch)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Barbara Jo Downing, 67, of Manchester, passed away Friday, Sept. 11, 2020 at Adams County Manor.  She was born May 6, 1953 in West Union, daughter of the late Joe Yates and Loretta Secrist Johnson.  She was the widow of the late Doug Downing, who passed away in 2000.  In addition to her husband and parents, she was preceded in death by a son, Douglas Downing. She is survived by her son, Benjamin Downing and wife Kerinda of Seaman; two granddaughters, Adison and Ambree Downing; siblings, Sheila Carter, Beth Johnson, Jeff Johnson, Bob Johnson, Ray Johnson; niece, Jonda Young and husband Greg; nephew, Cody Carter and wife Michelle. Family and friends are invited to a visitation from noon until the time of the funeral service at 1 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 at the Wilson Funeral Home in Manchester.  Burial will follow at Manchester Cemetery.last_img read more

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first_imgThe eighth-annual Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon, a student-led fundraiser for Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, raised an all-time high amount of funds at this year’s event. Committee members said Saturday’s event in the Angela Athletic Facility raised $104,374.83 for the Hospital. “Seeing the total reveal at the end was so exciting and unexpected,” Dance Marathon president Amy Tiberi said. Tiberi said she first became involved with the event in her high school and developed a passion that she wanted to carry over to her college experience. “I am from the Indianapolis area and was involved with Dance Marathon all throughout high school,” Tiberi said. “It was a very natural transition for me to be a part of the committee here at Saint Mary’s. I have had close friends treated at Riley Hospital, so there is that personal connection, but really just seeing how much this hospital positively affects lives is enough for me to want to be involved.” She said the committee hosts several fundraisers throughout the academic year, but the marathon is its most well-known campus fundraiser. “Each year we pick a theme for Dance Marathon and throughout the year we raise money through sponsors and local business support,” Tiberi said. “This year the theme was ‘Rock of Ages’ and we went in with the goal of raising $88,000.” Tiberi said the event gives students who are not on the committee the chance to fundraise for the cause. “I knew I couldn’t be a board member, but at the same time I wanted very much to be a part of this marathon because it is for such a great cause,” senior Gabriell Sabatini said. “I was able to sign up as a dancer and raise about $200 for the Riley Hospital”. This year the marathon featured music, dancing, games, crafts and other entertainment. Tiberi said she encouraged students from other area colleges to come, as well as members of the community. An estimated 300 people attended the event. Salon Rouge, a local salon, sponsored a table at the event giving away gift bags and offering services for a low price. “We are a small business in town and we want the community to know we are here to help,” manager Ann Malencia said. “We are not just here to make money. You never know the background of the person walking through the door of the salon and we want to show the community we are here to listen and we are here to help.” Tiberi said most participants’ favorite part of the marathon is when local Riley families come in and share their stories to the crowd. Gary Newcomb, whose child receives treatment at Riley, publicly shared the story of his daughter, Emily, for the first time. “About eight months ago, after a misdiagnosis from a local hospital, Emily had to be rushed to Riley Hospital where they found out her liver was very enlarged and tumors were on it,” Newcomb said. “A couple of months later we received a phone call saying Emily had fluid in her brain.” Newcomb said he and his wife “literally thought we were watching her [Emily] pass in front of us”. But after two brain surgeries, Newcomb said Emily is in the recovering process thanks to the compassion and care of the staff at Riley Hospital. “Her brain surgeries were right around Christmas time and we mentioned to the staff we were unable to get a family picture with Santa,” Newcomb said. “After Emily was out of her second surgery a nurse came and got us. One of the doctors, not even Emily’s, drove to his house to pick up a Santa costume and came back to the hospital so we could get our family picture. This is just one example of the compassion of the Riley staff.” Newcomb thanked the crowd and said Riley families hugely appreciate fundraising events like Dance Marathon. “Emily is easily over a million-dollar baby,” Newcomb said. “Without this type of monetary support we really don’t know what we would have done.” Mother Brooke Young also spoke about her son, Seth, and his experience with the hospital. “One minute we were packing for a family vacation to Texas and the next minute our world was turned upside down,” Young said. “We received a phone call from Seth’s doctor saying there were abnormalities in Seth’s bloodwork. He was admitted to Riley hospital and we were told our 12-year-old son has Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.” Young said her family was “forced to endure a journey they never thought they would be taking”, but the hospital staff at Riley was there to throughout its duration. “We have developed loving relationships with the nursing staff at Riley hospital,” Young said. “They have become what we consider parts of our extended family.” Young ended her story by thanking the crowd and the Saint Mary’s organizers of Dance Marathon. “Know what you are doing is absolutely amazing,” Young said. “You are truly helping families. Never doubt the Riley staff. They are an army of amazing people and have a true compassion for the children they care for.” Tiberi said these are the stories and the people her committee works for. “It truly is a good cause,” Tiberi said. “I can’t wait to see the passion for Dance Marathon continue to pour out next year.”last_img read more

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first_img Davis said there remains an ongoing investigation, adding the Texas Department of Public Safety first received a report of a vehicle in Adams Bayou on FM 1078 at approximately 3 p.m. Saturday. Port Arthur authorities helped locate a deceased man this weekend, found after his vehicle became submerged in Orange County.Sgt. Stephanie Davis said a Department of Public Safety investigation indicates at approximately 4:30 a.m. Saturday, a 2006 GMC pickup truck was traveling northbound on FM 1078 when the driver failed to drive in a single lane and drove onto the bridge guardrail at Adam’s Bayou. Next UpThe vehicle continued over the bridge and plunged into the bayou.The driver, 49-year-old Darren Ross May of Orange, was recovered from the waterway by dive teams from the Orange County Sheriff’s Office and Port Arthur Police Department.center_img Justice of the Peace Hershel Stagner pronounced May deceased at approximately 2:53 a.m. Sunday.last_img read more

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first_imgCan’t say it better than this video’s title: amazing stunt riding… on a carbon road bike.UK trials legend Martyn Ashton takes a carbon road bike to the BikeRadar Festival. Completely breathtaking, awesome and, frankly, scary.Peeped at BikeRadar.last_img

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first_img View Comments Friends! The Musical Parody Katie Johantgen, Alan Trinca, Landon Zwick, Lisa Graye, Seth Blum & Patricia Sabulis in “Friends! The Musical Parody” (Photo: Russ Rowland) Related Showscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on July 22, 2018 Ross, Rachel, Chandler, Monica, Joey and Phoebe are going to be leaving Central Perk sooner than expected. Friends! The Musical Parody will play its final performance on July 22 at St. Luke’s Theatre after it was previously announced that the show was extended until September 2. When it ends its run, Friends! The Musical Parody will have played 17 previews and 213 regular performances.Friends! The Musical Parody is an unauthorized parody of the hit TV show of the same name created by Bob and Tobly McSmith, directed by Paul Stancatomusic with music by Assaf Gleizner. The show stars Seth Blum, Lisa Graye, Katie Johantgen, Patricia Sabulis, Alan Trinca and Landon Zwick as Chandler, Monica, Phoebe, Rachel, Joey and Ross respectively.The comedy began performances on October 13, 2017 and the show officially opened on November 2, 2017. It was originally a limited engagement set to end on December 31, 2017, but was extended first through March 31 and then again through September 2. last_img read more

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first_imgThe University of Vermont rose 10 places to 82 in the 2014 U.S. News & World Report college rankings. UVM was also ranked 34th among 173 public universities and 14th on the magazine’s “Up-and-Coming-Schools” list. Up-and-coming schools are those “making the most promising and innovative changes in the areas of academics, faculty and student life,” the magazine says. The schools were selected based on the number of nominations they received from top college officials in their ranking peer group.”We’re pleased to have risen ten spots among national universities in U.S. News & World Reports’ latest rankings,” said UVM president Tom Sullivan. “The reason for the rise, largely, is an improvement in the university’s graduation rate, where the university shines, especially compared with other publics. It’s also gratifying to be on the magazine’s ‘Up & Coming Schools’ list, since that designation comes from our peers at other national universities who have noticed the great strides UVM has made recently and over the last decade.” UVM 9.10.2013last_img read more

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first_imgE4H Environments for Health Architecture,by Jennifer Arbuckle, Partner, E4H Environments for Health Architecture There is a continuing trend throughout the country towards an integrated, “one-stop shop” medical village.  The objective is to modernize and improve care delivery by integrating hospital care with retail, housing, elder care and living systems. As market forces drive the need to streamline, consolidate and achieve greater efficiencies, while consumers expect greater access and convenience, and as reimbursement models favor holistic care rather than periodic treatment incidents, a more comprehensive architectural design approach is needed. The healthcare village approach is evident in the new partnerships forming among healthcare providers, government agencies and real estate companies to pursue these projects, reflecting greater collaboration and a more coordinated way of delivering care. More frequently we are seeing urgent care, elder care, preventative care, health education, and other outpatient services clustered in one-stop shopping destinations.Medical villages feature flexible, adaptable facilities that are designed to accommodate, and anticipate, evolutions in care delivery and technology. They achieve new efficiencies in how space is used, enabling clinical and administrative services to provide multiple functions simultaneously – reducing overall costs.Patients visiting a medical village can benefit in terms of time, convenience, and access. They can connect with multiple providers in one location, accessing both primary and urgent care, lab work, rehabilitation services, and pharmacy, while also attending educational and wellness classes, all within walking distance.E4H Environments for Health Architecture, a nationwide architecture and design firm exclusively focused on healthcare, is at the forefront of this design trend, engaged in many such projects across the country.  E4H’s modular designs focus on creating spaces that can be multi-functional, with maximum flexibility, using the same area, for example, for a rotating specialty clinic one week, and once a month infusion therapy the next week.  Exam rooms are designed to be as uniform as possible, enabling use by any type of provider from psychiatric to cardiology. Likewise, procedure rooms are not dedicated to only one type of procedure, but designed for flexible use. There are shared reception and waiting areas, staff support areas, and bathrooms saving the cost of excess square footage and services. Private offices are minimal, staff work areas are open and collaborative, with areas for private consultation strategically located throughout.   Some examples of E4H’s medical village projects from around the country, supported by these unique funding partnerships, include:In TICONDEROGA, New York, The entire Inter-Lakes Health campus, which houses Moses Ludington Hospital, is being transformed into “a medical village”. This project entails 26,000 SF of renovations, expected to be complete in late 2018. The hospital will include an emergency department, diagnostic imaging, an outpatient clinic, PT/Rehab, Lab, and Pharmacy. and adjacent on the same campus there will be senior housing, a nursing home, adult home, dental clinic, and a primary care center, as well as hospice care and substance-abuse treatment. The $9 million project is being funded in part by New York’s Department of Health. A critical part to the project’s completion is the hospital’s partnership with the University of Vermont Health Network, which will further enable the system to bring all new modern facilities to serve more North Country patients. This collaborative approach to design will allow the system to bring an expanded array of outpatient services to their patients, without expanding the footprint of the hospital.This project is supported by New York State’s major grant program, the Delivery System Reform Incentive Program, aimed at a fundamental restructuring of the healthcare delivery system, and reducing avoidable hospital use by 25% over 5 years. The Harker Heights Medical Pavilion, a three-story, 60,000SF medical office building located on the Seton Medical Center campus in Harker Heights, Texas.  Rendina Healthcare Real Estate, one of the largest full-service healthcare real estate firms in the country, developed the building in joint ownership with the many specialists who occupy offices there.  Patients have access to numerous medical specialties all under one roof including family practice, internal medicine, cardiology, general surgery, orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, gastroenterology, otolaryngology, nephrology, neurology, oncology, rheumatology, and urology. One of the first such projects E4H Environments for Health Architecture completed was for Dartmouth Hitchcock in Nashua NH. This multi-specialty medical office/ambulatory care building accommodates both primary and specialty care patients in a collaborative environment. Diagnostic testing, endoscopy, MRI/CT, and infusion therapy are provided on site as well as a walk-in clinic for same-day care. Clinical and support programs include pediatrics, family medicine, oncology, internal medicine, gastroenterology, and space for visiting specialists. This 150,000SF space was designed with E4H’s modular approach, creating a Lean environment with extraordinary flexibility for future use. It includes collaborative off stage areas, instead of private physician offices, and saved valuable square footage for clinical space. The design supports this patient-centered Medical Home model where a primary care team, led by the physician, works collaboratively to address the acute, chronic, and preventative needs of patients.The pace of change in healthcare delivery will only increase in the coming years, with new technologies, medical treatments, and certain economic pressures and changes to payment models. Creative public/private partnerships, integrated campus models and design innovations that can readily adapt will be critical to that future. No one can afford to let space sit idle, so increasing flexibility of usage allows healthcare providers to do more with less and improves the patient experience at the same time.Jennifer Arbuckle, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Partner, E4H, WillistonJennifer has 27 years of diverse healthcare experience. She has guided many projects from master planning through construction and is a talented planner, architect, and designer. She has worked on projects across New York State and New England, ranging from Children’s Hospitals to Community Medical Centers. She is also the Chair of the Vermont Board of Architects.last_img read more

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first_imgThe current rash of COVID-19 cases and ensuing hospitalizations has prompted Johnson County commissioners to take a hard look at whether county operations are following their own health department’s advice.That focus has been trained in recent days on the Johnson County Parks and Recreation District, which is currently set to offer winter activities even as county health officials have urged public schools to cancel their winter sports in order to decrease transmission of the coronavirus.The Board of County Commissioners will hold a special meeting at 1 p.m. Friday to look at, among other things, whether the county park district should continue to offer indoor sports like basketball, volleyball and soccer this winter. The commission will also consider next steps in stemming the spread that has recently threatened hospital capacity.The agenda posted Thursday said the commission will look at reports and recommendations and “proposed actions,” which have not yet been specified.The meeting follows several days of increasingly worrying news on coronavirus cases in the county and criticism from Shawnee Mission School Superintendent Mike Fulton earlier this week as the board considered the county recommendation on indoor sports.‘We have to do something’Johnson County continues to surpass its previous worst weeks on infection, and the number of cases has shot up in the past fourteen days, which has also resulted in more crowded hospitals, health officials said.In his most recent coronavirus update, county Public Health Director Dr. Sanmi Areola said the number of cases is sharply up again for the week of Oct. 11, at 260 per day. The previous week was 179 per day. The percent of cases that are positive also is spiking, with 14.5 percent the latest number compared to 5.8 percent three weeks ago, he said.The exponential rise in cases is in danger of overwhelming contact tracers and investigators in their efforts to warn people who are exposed to stay home, he said.“We have to do something and do something now,” Areola said.The virus is spreading freely throughout the community, with much of the transmission among younger people and the elderly bearing the brunt of the deaths. Areola and county epidemiologist Elizabeth Holzschuh presented figures showing that 82 percent of the positive cases but only 5 percent of the deaths were among those 59 or younger, while people 70 or older made up only 9 percent of new infections but 85 percent of the deaths. Those in the 59 and below age range also accounted for 38 percent of hospitalizations and 28 percent of intensive care beds.Most of the infections have been in gatherings, Holzschuh said. An October 16 wedding accounted for 10 confirmed cases, and another on Oct. 17 for five. More clusters were found from a going-away party and in food service distribution, possibly from a food truck.The health officials also said two school classrooms – a second grade class and a fourth-grade class – were quarantining because of multiple cases. A private school in the area shut down for two weeks because of transmission attributed to social events like Halloween party, a charity dinner and a happy hour.In addition three daycares are closed and 17 positive cases were associated with day care staff and attendees on Monday alone. That’s up sharply from two weeks ago, when only a few a week would have been normal, according to the health department’s presentation to commissioners.A positive case was also linked to the Election Night party hosted by county Republicans.Health department officials have declined to name any of the schools, daycares or private businesses where clusters occurred, citing privacy concerns.Superintendent says county leagues put unfair burden on schoolsThe bad COVID-19 report Thursday followed a special meeting of the Shawnee Mission School boarg Tuesday in which Superintendent Mike Fulton expressed frustration at the county for discouraging winter school sports while offering county leagues for indoor basketball, volleyball and soccer.That puts an unfair burden on schools, he said, because kids whose parents can afford it will still play at park programs or ball clubs where they can contract the virus.On Thursday, county Commissioner Becky Fast noted Fulton’s comments and said she’d like to hear from all the county departments about whether they’re following best practices.“I walk by Meadowbrook (Park) seven nights a week and there’s always some party that’s going on with no masking,” she said. “This is a crisis. We have a fire and we need to start with our own organization.”Commissioner Janee Hanzlick agreed.“We’ve heard a lot about self responsibility. Well that’s not working. We need to protect our children, we need to protect business and we need to protect hospitals,” she said. “None of us wants to get into a car wreck and not be able to get into a hospital,” she said.County Park and Recreation Director Jeff Stewart said the park district has taken pains to limit spectators at the sports but that it does not have policing authority to force anyone to wear a mask. Because of the limits on attendance at games, the parks department’s situation is different from that of schools, he said.So far the park district has not received any recommendations directed at its programs, but stands ready to make changes if that happens, Stewart said.The park district offers sports year round, but now is the beginning of the heavier basketball league season, he said.“We also recognize that we’re still in a very fluid environment and sometimes those plans have to change depending on where we’re at in the community as it relates to the pandemic,” he said.The district will continue to review its programs with the health department, he said, and changes would be made with the health department’s guidance. “We recognize the value, the importance of having safe places for people to go to recreate, to exercise etcetera. If it’s determined by our health officials that we need to suspend that because we’ve had an extreme spike in cases, then we’ll be in alignment with that.”last_img read more

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first_imgby. Margaret Chadbourn and Aruna ViswanathaBank of America agreed to pay $9.3 billion to settle claims that it sold Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac faulty mortgage bonds, helping the bank to end one of the largest legal headaches it still faced from the financial crisis.The settlement, announced on Wednesday, includes $6.3 billion in cash and the rest in securities that Bank of America will purchase from the two housing finance entities.The second-largest U.S. bank by assets said it had now resolved around 88 percent of its total exposure to securities at issue in the mortgage bond litigation it has faced.Bank of America’s first-quarter profits could take a substantial hit from the deal. The bank said the settlement was expected to reduce first-quarter income by about 21 cents a share, or three-quarters of what analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S forecasted the bank to earn before the settlement was announced.Also on Wednesday, Bank of America and its former chief executive, Kenneth Lewis, settled a lawsuit by New York’s attorney general that alleged it misled investors about mounting losses at Merrill Lynch & Co, which the bank agreed to acquire at the height of the financial crisis. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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first_img January 15, 2017 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Bar board puts a wrap on Vision 2016 Senior Editor The Bar Board of Governors has acted on the last recommendations from the Vision 2016 commission, including reaffirming that nonlawyers should not own law firms in Florida and considering a liaison representing law schools on the board. The board voted on the final 11 proposals — most of which were to accept commission recommendations not to act on various issues — at its December meeting in Clearwater. Over the past year or so, the board has considered several recommendations from Vision 2016 and its four subgroups. Most notably it approved a suggestion, since adopted by the Supreme Court, to raise the Bar’s CLE requirement from 30 to 33 hours each three years with the extra three credits devoted to technology issues. Related to that issue, the board created a board-level Technology Committee and also a Standing Committee on Technology. The board unanimously rejected a suggestion by the Vision 2016 subgroup on Bar Admissions to establish reciprocity with other states after Bar members expressed overwhelming opposition to that idea. Vision 2016 was “a concept to study the future of the practice of law in Florida and was transformed into action,” said board member Jay Cohen, who served as administrator of the commission. He noted the commission had four subgroups: legal education, bar admissions, technology, and access to legal services. “The study and recommendations were met with appreciation in some ways and in other ways were absolutely disdained,” he added. “It engaged our Bar in consideration of the practice of law today and in the future.” The remaining items acted on by the board in December were lower profile, and the board’s action was necessary to wind up the commission’s work. Two were referred to the board’s Program Evaluation Committee for further study. One item is having a permanent body, perhaps through revamping the Student Education and Admissions to the Bar Committee, to work with the board on legal education matters. The second is to have a law school position on the board. The board already has nonvoting ex-officio members representing government lawyers, the Cuban American Bar Association, the Florida Association for Women Lawyers, the Tampa Hispanic Bar Association, and the Virgil Hawkins Florida Chapter of the National Bar Association. On all remaining matters, the board endorsed Vision 2016’s recommendation not to take any action. Those matters included the so-called “Katrina rule,” which would allow out-of-state lawyers to temporarily open offices in Florida to serve their home-state clients following a natural disaster, allowing lawyers licensed in other countries to practice pro hac vice in Florida, and adopting additional rules relating to conflicts, fees, and training for lawyers who have limited-scope representation contracts with clients. On the latter issue, the commission concluded existing Bar rules are sufficient. Aside from those issues, the board, at a different part of the meeting, acted on two other recommendations that stemmed from Vision 2016: approving a rule to allow lawyer spouses of military personnel stationed in Florida to practice in the state under certain conditions and asking the Professional Ethics Committee to prepare an ethics opinion on Bar members splitting fees with out-of-state lawyers who may work for law firms with nonlawyer owners. Earlier recommendations from Vision 2016 include: • Limiting the number of subjects covered on the bar exam to allow law students to focus more on practical experiences, such as working in legal clinics. The Florida Board of Bar Examiners has formed a committee to conduct a review of subjects tested on the bar exam. • Approving a rule amendment allowing foreign lawyers to be certified as Authorized House Counsel. • Preparing and completing an e-etiquette handbook now on the Bar’s website. • Having a Florida Bar Journal issue devoted to technology, which was done in January 2016. Additionally, Vision 2016 stimulated a larger discussion on how the legal profession would deal with a changing legal marketplace, being transformed by technology and companies that seek to sell legal forms to consumers and also link consumers with lawyers for certain legal problems. Bar board puts a wrap on Vision 2016last_img read more

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