first_imgThe Notre Dame student senate convened for its first official meeting of the year Monday night in the LaFortune Ballroom. During the meeting, members of the senate briefly discussed campus dining’s newest innovation — NDtoGo, an app that will allow students to order their food in advance and pick it up at various locations around campus. Senators also examined the new clear bag policy for events in Notre Dame stadium, which will be implemented starting this Saturday at the Notre Dame-Michigan game. NDtoGo will utilize an app called Tapingo, allowing students to place their orders ahead of time at main locations of campus restaurants like Starbucks and Smashburger, Briana Tucker, student government chief of staff, said. Students who order using the app will also be able to track their order. Tucker said NDtoGo may eventually offer delivery services as well. The senate was also briefed on the new clear bag guidelines for Notre Dame stadium events. Mike Seamon, vice president of campus safety and event management, and Keri Kei Shibata, chief of the Notre Dame Security Police Department, outlined the policy. Seamon cited the April 2013 Boston Marathon bombing as the beginning of a series of additional safety procedures that would eventually lead to the clear bag policy. “[We], like many other institutions across the country, both professional and collegiate and university sports, decided that we needed to do something,” Seamon said. After the Marathon bombing, Notre Dame prohibited large bags and duffel bags from stadium events. In addition, security officers began examining all bags upon entry. Seamon said this policy caused much controversy among game attendees about what size and styles of bags were acceptable. Notre Dame then decided to follow the lead of many other universities and professional sports teams and implement the clear bag policy.Seamon then detailed the exact criterion that any bag must meet to be admitted into the stadium.“A bag has to be clear and it cannot be bigger than 12 by 12 by 6 inches,” Seamon said.Clear bags will still be inspected upon entry into the stadium, Seamon said. Purses or large wallets with dimensions no bigger than 4.5 by 6.5 inches will also be allowed in, and don’t necessarily need to be clear. Shibata added that the clear bag policy will also increase efficiency because the security guards will be able to check the contents of people’s bags more quickly and thoroughly. The presenters then opened up the floor for questions from senators.One senator asked if the “clear” applied to red or green see-through plastic or even semi-clear frosted bags. Seamon and Shibata clarified that the bag must be completely clear to be allowed into the stadium.Another senator broached the question of whether the clear bag policy would apply to the Duncan Student Center, O’Neill Family Hall, and the other buildings that attach to the stadium on game days. Seamon responded by saying that as of midnight on a game or event day, the entire stadium, including its adjacent attached buildings, becomes a heightened zone of security. The entire complex, including O’Neill, Duncan, and Corbett Halls are all closed for a “variety of police sweeps,” Seamon said. Therefore, all of these buildings will be closed until two hours after the game.Tags: clear bag policy, NDSP, security, student senatelast_img read more

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first_imgWhile Election Day is tomorrow, as of Sunday afternoon a record 93 million Americans have already voted, which is two-thirds of the entire voting population of the 2016 election. The New York Times reported the country is estimated to surpass 150 million votes for the first time in American history. The Observer recently polled its followers on Twitter asking how they are voting in the election. Of the 177 responses, 72.9% have already voted by mail, 11.9% said they voted in-person, 9.6% said they have yet to vote, but will and 5.6% said they will not be voting.  Isabella Volmert | The Observer The mailbox outside of South Dining Hall is one of the on-campus locations Notre Dame students could mail their absentee and mail-in ballots.Senior Michael Marotta, co-chair of ND Votes, said while it’s too early to know how many Notre Dame students have voted, he predicts students will complete their ballots in greater numbers than in the 2016 election. ND Votes is a student run, non-partisan campaign sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns, the Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy and the Constitutional Studies Minor with the mission of mobilizing and educating Notre Dame voters. The have sponsored a number of events this past semester in preparation for the election, and they prepared a voting guide for students.ND Votes participates in and utilizes the work of the National Study of Learning Voting and Engagement (NSLVE), an initiative of the Institute for Democracy and Higher Education (IDHE) at Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life, a research center focused on college students’ participation in democracy The NSLVE created a report on student voting rates at Notre Dame in the 2016 election, and concluded a 54% voting rate among students at Notre Dame. Both Marotta and senior Rachel Sabnani, who is also a co-chair of ND Votes, expect a larger turnout among students this election. Sabnani said their organization saw an uptick in interest in their work this year, starting back in the summer. “We have really exponentially grown,” she said. ND Votes’s task force is made up of student dorm representatives and representatives of various political and non-partisan ]clubs and organizations on campus. “Our task force has doubled and tripled in size,” Sabnani said. Additionally, the club has been contacted by a number of other ND organizations as well such as academic departments, the athletics department and even personally by Muffet McGraw.Sabnani said they were also contacted by national organizations with similar missions as ND Votes such as Democracy Works and Voting Counts. Sabnani attributed the increased interest in ND Votes to a few factors, one being the club’s neutral position. “I think the country became more partisan and divided in the past few years, [so] people are drawn to our nonpartisanship,” she said. She also noted college students this year were in high school during the last election. She said since then, they have noticed how the government has affected their families and lives. “I think a lot of new young people are forming a political conscious,” she said. Marotta said almost everyone they have asked are registered to vote, which he believes is a result of the 2020 election’s heightened polarization. Saint Mary’s junior Catherine O’Neil cast her ballot through the mail, although she said she had a difficult experience. O’Neil, originally from Illinois, initially requested a ballot from her home county to be sent to her school address. “It was my first time voting in a presidential election,” she said. After weeks of waiting, O’Neil called the county clerk’s office and discovered her ballot had instead been sent to her permanent home address. O’Neil then requested a new ballot, but also had to mark the first ballot as “spoiled” for her new one to be counted. O’Neil said she had trouble finding information on what do do in her situation and several of her friends from her hometown experienced a similar problem. She is still worried if her new ballot will be counted in time. “Is my vote even going to be counted at this point?” she said. O’Neil said she is passionate about making sure her vote was accounted for especially after the events of this past year. “It’s a big year for the president, it’s a big year for the House,” she said. “It’s really important to make sure that the people that are in charge are people who are willing to speak for the people instead of just themselves or their donors.” Margaret McGreevy, a Notre Dame junior, was able to vote in-person a few weeks ago in South Bend. “I’m local so it was easier for me to vote in-person. I wanted to be sure my vote would be counted,” she said.McGreevy and two of her friends went to vote early in the morning one Friday. She said the process of voting took about an hour and fifteen minutes, as there was a long line, and then got breakfast together afterwards. “We kinda made like a half day of it,” she joked.McGreevy and her friends, after voting, saw former South Bend mayor and former Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg in line. “He was just standing in line along with everyone else,” she said. “It was kinda cool to see a politician going through the voting process just like anyone else.” The three friends were then able to take a socially-distanced picture with Buttigieg. “I think voting is so important,” McGreevy said. “I felt very empowered to go in-person and very lucky.” Tags: 2020 election, absentee ballot, mail in ballot, ND Votes, november general election, votelast_img read more

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first_img Curley Latiolais, 91, of Kountze, died Thursday, July 14, 2016. Melancon’s Funeral Home, Nederland. Next Up Death notices Ronnie Dale Hardin, 64, died Wednesday, July 13, 2016. Levingston Funeral Home, Groves.Crawford Walker, 50, of Beaumont died Tuesday, July 12, 2016. Proctor’s Mortuary, Beaumont.center_img Services todayHelen Rolf Rodgers Wilson, Oak Bluff Memorial Park, Port Neches, 11 a.m.last_img

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first_img Written by Morisseau, Sunset Baby tells the story of a former black revolutionary and political prisoner who decides to connect with his estranged daughter. He quickly discovers that fatherhood might be the most challenging revolution of all. Sunset Baby will begin performances November 6. Daphne Rubin-Vega Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 19, 2013 The Labyrinth Theater Company has announced its fall 2013 season, which will include Obie and Drama Desk Award winner Eric Bogosian performing 100 monologues from his one-man shows from the 1980s and ’90s, a new play by Dominique Morisseau (Detroit ’67) and a new series of “artist salons,” featuring performances and conversations with company members. This season is the first to be planned by the company’s new artistic director, Mimi O’Donnell. A Labyrinth spring production will be announced at a later date. Bogosian will read and perform selections from his new book, 100, which features monologues originally performed as part of his six off-Broadway solo shows. The selections will differ at each performance, and will include monologues from Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll, Pounding Nails in the Floor with my Forehead, Wake Up and Smell the Coffee and more. 100 Monologues will run from October 1 through 20. Related Shows 100 (Monologues) View Comments The season will kick off with the “artist salons,” which will feature poet Craig “muMs” Grant (HBO’s Oz), Tony nominee Daphne Rubin-Vega and Emmy nominee David Bar Katz. Grant will perform September 9 through 10, Rubin-Vega on September 16 and 17 and Katz on September 23 through 24 at Labyrinth’s Bank Street Theater. Star Fileslast_img read more

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first_img(609) 754-5023The McGuire Passenger Terminal is committed to providing the best possible service. Space Available seats are often limited, therefore, passenger planning and flexibility is key to Space Available travel from JB MDL. Amenities include, snack and drink vending machines, bathrooms and The Flight Kitchen from which meals can be purchased. Long-term parking is available for 60 days at a time at the parking center. Passes are required and can be obtained at the passenger terminal.last_img read more

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first_imgA play on Lance’s comment after winning the Sestriere mountain stage at the 1999 Tour de France. Damien Hirst, the artist that brought us such objects as the diamond encrusted skull (shown after the break), has designed this butterfly job for Lance’s latest custom Trek Madone.  It’s rumored this is the bike he’ll ride during the final stage of this year’s Tour de France, then it’ll be auctioned as part of his Stages charity benefit.  This bike follows in the footsteps of the other custom Madones by Shepard Fairey, Barry McGee, and KAWS.Check out the matching aero wheels after the break, along with another custom Madone by Futura that we’d never seen before… The Bontrager deep “v” rims get the butterfly treatment, too.I think a diamond encrusted Madone might attract more attention…The next one was actually done back in 2008, we’d just never seen it before.  It’s by NYC artist Futura, and it’s calle the Big Apple Madone.  Click the images to enlarge:last_img read more

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first_imgSasson Gabay & Chilina Kennedy (Photos: Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com) Welcome to nowhere everywhere! The 10-time Tony-winning musical The Band’s Visit is getting ready to hit the road for its first national tour starring Chilina Kennedy as Dina and Sasson Gabay reprising the role of Tewfiq, the role he created in the 2007 film and most recently played on Broadway. Gabay’s son, Adam Gabay, will also appear in the road production as Papi. Featuring music and lyrics by Tony Award winner David Yazbek and a book by Tony Award winner Itamar Moses, The Band’s Visit is based on the screenplay by Eran Kolirin and is directed by Tony Award winner David Cromer. After the group performed “Welcome to Nowhere,” they posed for photos before they begin their journey across America on June 25 at the Providence Performing Arts Center. Check out the pics below and be sure to catch this Tony-winning musical when it comes to a city near you. Star Files Sasson Gabay, composer David Yazbeck, Chilina Kennedy and director David Cromer with producer Orin Wolf. Stars Sasson Gabay and Chilina Kennedy get close. The company of the National Tour of The Band’s Visit get together.center_img View Comments Chilina Kennedy Sasson Gabay Sasson Gabay and his son Adam Gabay have a laugh. last_img read more

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first_img“It’s early, and we have people that haven’t thrown that much and they’re learning. I know that they’ll get to where we need them to be,” Allister said.During her second appearance — a 10-5 loss to Fordham — Anderson struggled early and often.Before she could record an out, Allister removed her from the circle.Anderson faced eight batters and allowed eight runs to cross the plate.After Anderson’s replacement, sophomore Hannah Evavold gave up a run in one inning, Stober took to the circle again. She faced 20 batters and allowed one run off of five hits.Allister has preached the importance of having two of the three phases — pitching, hitting and defense — in order to win.But over the weekend, Minnesota’s pitching fell short.“[Pitcher] is the most important position on the field. It doesn’t matter who you are or who you’re playing, [pitching] is a factor,” Allister said. Minnesota’s pitchers falter in three-loss weekendMinnesota lost three of the four games it played over the weekend.Daily File Photo; Jaak JensenMinnesota’s Nikki Anderson pitches during a doubleheader against Wisconsin on Sunday, April 7, 2013, at Jane Sage Cowles Stadium. Matt GreensteinMarch 2, 2015Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintStrong pitching helped the Gophers win all but one of their first 14 games this season.But over the weekend, while in Florida, Minnesota’s pitching assisted in three losses.The Gophers won only one of four games.Last year, then-sophomore Nikki Anderson pitched 42 innings mostly in relief appearances.But over the weekend, the junior pitched less than five innings, giving up 12 runs — 10 earned.Anderson’s struggles were visible during the Gophers’ second game — an 8-2 loss against James Madison — with a 4.2 inning relief appearance. She came in for freshman Kylie Stober.Stober gave up four runs on six hits in just more than one inning pitched.She took the loss, but of James Madison’s 18 hits, 12 were against Anderson.Earlier this season, head coach Jessica Allister said Minnesota’s pitching staff will get back to the “1A-1B” pitching rotation it had with sophomore Sara Groenewegen and Sara Moulton last year.But the Gophers have some work to do before getting there, and Anderson’s weekend solidified that.last_img read more

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first_img More of our Members in the Media > The New York Times:Just be yourself.The advice is as maddening as it is inescapable. It’s the default prescription for any tense situation: a blind date, a speech, a job interview, the first dinner with the potential in-laws. Relax. Act natural. Just be yourself.But when you’re nervous, how can you be yourself? How you can force yourself to relax? How can you try not to try?It makes no sense, but the paradox is essential to civilization, according to Edward Slingerland. He has developed, quite deliberately, a theory of spontaneity based on millenniums of Asian philosophy and decades of research by psychologists and neuroscientists.He calls it the paradox of wu wei, the Chinese term for “effortless action.” Pronounced “ooo-way,” it has similarities to the concept of flow, that state of effortless performance sought by athletes, but it applies to a lot more than sports. Wu wei is integral to romance, religion, politics and commerce. It’s why some leaders have charisma and why business executives insist on a drunken dinner before sealing a deal.Read the whole story: The New York Timeslast_img read more

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first_imgHowever, LAPD understands with fewer vehicles on the roadway it may provide more opportunities for speeding due to the lack of congestion. In addition, there are more children and families out walking, jogging, and crossing the road than previous years. LAPD wants to urge motorists to slow down and assist them in their efforts for speed reduction.  It is important to remember that speed limits may not even be the “safe speed”, especially when you add more pedestrians and cyclists. When you drive in a neighborhood with grades, curves, parked vehicles, etc. it creates hazards that should require a prudent driver to reduce their speed. Los Alamos County has a specific ordinance to address this issue called the “Basic Speed Rule”.No person shall drive a vehicle at a speed greater than is reasonable and prudent under the conditions and having regard to the actual and potential hazards then existing. Consistent with the foregoing, every person shall drive at a safe and appropriate speed when approaching and crossing an intersection, when approaching and going around a curve, when approaching a hill crest, when traveling upon any narrow or winding street, and when special hazards exist with respect to pedestrians or other traffic or by reason of weather or highway conditions.LAPD wants the public to assist them in keeping the above rule in mind. LAPD also is working with Traffic & Streets to deploy speed monitoring devices in problem areas. They also have sent letters to certain neighborhoods asking for help in speed reduction. LAPS believes if they work with local citizens they can continue to keep Los Alamos safe.There is a Traffic Board zoom meeting scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 6. Cmdr. Oliver Morris will attend the meeting to hear any public comment on traffic concerns.The community is invited to attend the Zoom webinar.When: Aug 6, 2020 05:30 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)Topic: Transportation Board Monthly MeetingClick the link below to join the webinar:https://zoom.us/j/97630631133?pwd=VmhxZ2IxcnlJd2gzRlVoSGVxMURPZz09Passcode: 833325 LAPD Cpl. David Boe conducting speed enforcement near the golf course. Courtesy/LAPDLAPD News:The Los Alamos Police Department has noticed an increase in speeding concerns from the Los Alamos public over the last month. These concerns have come in a variety of forms to include; social media posts, emails, phone calls, and citizens utilizing the crime-tip submission tool on the LAPD website.LAPD wants to take the opportunity to assure the public these concerns are being addressed and it is an area of focus for traffic safety in the community. Extra Patrols have been communicated to each shift sergeant who is responsible for ensuring their units respond to areas of concern.Between March 1 and July 31, LAPD officers have made 768 traffic stops and written 578 citations. This is down from the same time period in 2019 where they made 1,120 traffic stops and wrote 902 citations.  There are several factors for this related to the COVID-19 pandemic, however LAPD is still enforcing traffic laws to ensure the safety of motorists and pedestrians. Traffic counts are lower due to the partial closures of LANL, school closures between March and May, and other closures.  A recent study of traffic counts on Trinity Drive revealed it is seeing about 50 percent of the normal traffic compared to previous years.  Traffic crashes have declined compared to the previous year, (see chart). last_img read more

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