first_imgShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink TagsInvestment Salescenter_img OUE Limited executive chairman and CEO Stephen Riady and the US Bank Tower (Credit: Wikipedia)After 18 months on the market, Downtown Los Angeles’ iconic U.S. Bank Tower has secured a buyer at a significant discount to its pre-coronavirus valuation.The seller, Singapore-based investment management firm OUE Limited, announced the $430 million sale and purchase agreement Friday. The buyer, USBT Property Owner LP, was identified only as an “institutional purchaser.”New York-based Silverstein Properties and other U.S. firms had been reported to be interested in the property. OUE disclosed the commencement of exploratory discussions with a prospective buyer last month.When the 72-story office tower at 633 West Fifth Street hit the market last year, the seller was reported to be seeking a price of around $700 million. In OUE’s latest annual report, the 1.4 million-square-foot property was valued at 881 million Singapore dollars or about $633 million.The agreed sale price reflects “the current US property market conditions in the relevant sectors amid the Covid-19 pandemic,” according to OUE’s announcement.The sale is expected to close in September, and the buyer has made a $10 million deposit. Closing may be extended by one month in exchange for an additional $5 million deposit.The sale will allow OUE to “streamline its asset ownership in a period when the longer term outlook of the U.S. property market may not be favourable,” the announcement said, noting that rental income from the property has been impacted by coronavirus.The proceeds from the sale may be recycled into “higher growth reinvestment opportunities” or increase cash reserves amid the uncertain economic climate. OUE owns properties in several Asian countries, including Singapore, China, Japan and Indonesia.U.S. Bank Tower was built in 1989, and OUE acquired the property for $367.5 million in 2013. OUE renovated the property and added an observation deck featuring a 36-foot long glass slide, known as OUE Skyspace LA. OUE is also in discussions with buyers to sell its leasehold interest in the observation deck, as well as its liquor license.OUE Commercial Real Estate Investment Trust was offered the right of first refusal on the sale, but declined the offer because “the proposed terms would not be accretive” to its distribution per unit.Contact Kevin Sun at [email protected] more2019: US Bank Tower in Downtown lists for sale2016: Woman sues after allegedly breaking her ankle on the US Bank Tower Skyslide2016: US Bank Tower to lure thrill seekers with sky slidelast_img read more

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first_imgSubscribe to Nuclear Power International magazine. The Tennessee Valley Authority  has asked theU.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to extend the construction permit for Bellefonte unit 1 to keep open the option to complete the partially-built unit. Under the current construction permit, TVA must complete construction by Oct. 1, 2011. TVA asked the NRC to extend the permit to October 2020. A reinstated construction permit for Bellefonte unit 2 is set to expire in October 2014. TVA told the NRC the extension would allow it either to complete constructing unit 1 or allow it to continue to preserve and maintain unit 1 in deferred status. The TVA board has said that it will make a decision on whether to go ahead with the completion of Bellefonte 1 after completing an integrated resource planning process, which is scheduled in the first half of 2011. TVA recently selected Areva for work including the engineering, licensing and procurement of long lead time materials to support a possible start-up date in the 2018-9 timeframe. Babcock and Wilcox also has been contracted to design and build two steam generators for Bellefonte 1. TVA has set aside $248 million in its fiscal 2011 budget for work toward completing the reactor. The NRC licensed the construction of the two B&W 1,213 MWe pressurized water reactors at the Alabama site in 1974. TVA halted work in the mid-1980s because of changes in forecast demand growth. In 1988, when TVA requested NRC classify the units as deferred, units 1 and 2 were 88 percent and 58 percent complete. No posts to display By chloecox – Twitter NuclearReactors TAGSTVA Optimizing Plant Performance: The April POWERGEN+ series activates today Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Suitors for halted Bellefonte nuclear project ask TVA to consider climate in reviving sale Twitter Facebook Linkedin 10.25.2010 TVAapplicationextend Linkedin New Jersey utility regulators extend zero-carbon breaks for PSEG nuclear power plants Previous articleOhio biomass qualifiesNext articleNuclear Power Executive Roundtable chloecox last_img read more

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first_imgObtained by ABC NewsBy MATTHEW MOSK, ABC News(WASHINGTON) — When the lead investigator in the manhunt for escaped murderer Lester Eubanks came to Washington, D.C., this summer to meet with U.S. Marshal Service top brass, he made a special diversion to the behavioral sciences unit, whose offices are deep in the bowels of the agency’s sprawling headquarters.“We were looking for a different perspective – a real outside-the-box thinker – who could possibly give us insight,” Deputy U.S. Marshal David Siler explained.Siler had spent years dissecting the shards of evidence surrounding the 1965 murder of 14-year-old Mary Ellen Deener, Eubanks’ 1973 escape from an Ohio prison and his series of false identities to remain at large. ABC News profiles this case in our podcast, “Have You Seen This Man?,” hosted by “The View’s” Sunny Hostin.Siler wondered if a psychological profile could help fill in some of the many gaps in his probe. He reached out to the U.S. Marshals Service chief psychologist Dr. Michael Bourke for answers.Bourke is a former prison psychologist who runs the Behavioral Analysis Unit, a team of mental health experts, forensic scientists and criminologists who can help deputies dig into the mindsets of the fugitives they are seeking.“We took a look at behavioral patterns and habits and other aspects of psychology that might inform how they direct their energy,” Bourke told ABC News. “In that mix is where you hope there’s a breakthrough.”The role of profiling in criminal investigations has seeped into popular culture through books and television shows like “Mindhunter” and “Criminal Minds.” Experts said the potential for a deep psychological analysis to help uncover helpful ideas for finding Eubanks should not be underestimated.“It can be a tremendous benefit to investigators,” said Bradley Garrett, a former FBI profiler and hostage negotiator who consults for ABC News. “It can help you to pull out behaviors that would give you indicators of what he might be connected to today.”Bourke’s team looked at two main aspects of the Eubanks case. They looked for clues about his personality that might give Siler new directions for his search. And they provided guidance for how Siler could approach interviews with potential witnesses who may know something about Eubanks’ whereabouts but be reluctant to talk.One important takeaway of the review, Bourke said, was his belief that Eubanks remains dangerous, calculating and at times impulsive, even as a man in his late 70s.“What you see in him is an absence of caring and the ability to flip a switch and have his conscience disappear,” Bourke said. “He is absolutely capable of committing serious acts of harm.”Even though much of the material in Eubanks’ file dates back decades, Bourke said it is “extremely hard” for a grown adult to alter the way he interacts with others.This aspect of Bourke’s analysis mirrored comments from the man whose mother harbored Eubanks in the early years after his escape in the 1970s. Darrell Banks, a cousin of Eubanks, was a teenager at the time. But he shared the belief that Eubanks would struggle to avoid some kind of physical conflict.“With his personality and his physical stature, he had to end up getting in some kind of trouble with somebody, somewhere,” Banks told ABC News. “He can’t control that temper that he had indefinitely without losing it once or twice at the wrong time, OK? Guaranteed, something happened, somewhere, at some point in time.”Bourke said he believes the Marshals should prioritize finding ways to use DNA from Eubanks’ relatives to help track him down.“I would say there is a probability that his DNA was taken from some sort of violent act or sexual act and is now sitting in a box [of evidence] somewhere,” Bourke said. “That’s a distinct possibility.”Bourke also encouraged investigators to continue to seek help from friends and relatives of Eubanks – many of whom have been stubborn in their refusals to assist the Marshals.The Marshal Service recently took the unusual step of doubling the reward money for information leading to Eubanks’ capture to $50,000, the most the service has offered for a 15 Most Wanted fugitive.“I don’t know his family members,” Bourke said. “But I would almost bet that there is someone out there in his family that recognizes that doing the right thing for the family of Mary Ellen would add a little bit of justice back into the world.”Siler said he thinks the consultation will benefit the investigation. Their input “opened up several other possibilities to target Eubanks and his associates,” he said.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgThe lion’s share of that will come from closing Ogilvy’s headquarters at 636 11th Avenue, where it has about 550,000 square feet, according to the publication, though some of that has been subleased over the years. The ad agency will move to 200 Fifth Avenue, where Grey Group, another WPP subsidiary, is already located.AKQA, a digital design and communication agency, will leave 114 Fifth Avenue and join other WPP companies, including GroupM and Wunderman Thompson, at 3 World Trade Center. And finally, Geometry will vacate 636 11th Avenue as it merges with VMLY&R at 3 Columbus Circle.Ogilvy declined to comment, and a WPP spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request for comment from the news outlet.The advertising sector has been among the hardest hit industries due to the pandemic. Earlier this year, R/GA, a global advertising agency, slashed the size of its 173,000-square-foot headquarters at Brookfield Property Partners’ 5 Manhattan West by 65 percent. [BI] — Akika Matsuda This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Now WPP global CEO Mark Read (iStock; WPP)As the pandemic rages on and timelines for when workers can return to offices continue to be pushed back, more firms are looking to cut their office real estate holdings.One example: WPP, the British advertising giant that’s the parent company of Ogilvy and GroupM, will reduce its New York City office space by 700,000 square feet, about a third of its footprint, Business Insider reported.The measure is part of the company’s plan to cut its global real estate costs by up to 20 percent in the next five years.Read moreSpike in Manhattan’s office sublease explainedA nationwide sublease surgehttps://therealdeal.com/issues_articles/a-long-road-ahead-for-office-landlords/last_img read more

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first_imgTrey then let out a soaring solo as the band moved forward with “Burn That Bridge”, a song from the Hands on a Hardbody musical for which Trey co-wrote the music. Following a high-energy take on Phish‘s “No Men In No Man’s Land”, the band dusted off “Flying Machines” for the first time since 2015, a track from 2015’s Paper Wheels LP. The octet continued on with “Everything’s Right” before surprising the crowd with the instrumental “Olivia”, last played on June 7th, 2003. The song was co-composed by Anastasio and Baptista and appeared on Trey’s 2007 studio effort, The Horseshoe Curve. Moving out of “Olivia”, TAB closed out their first set with “Sand”. On Monday night, Trey Anastasio Band continued their Colorado run with the first of two performances at Vail, CO’s Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater.Trey Anastasio and his band—comprised of Russ Lawton (drums), Tony Markellis (bass), Cyro Baptista (percussion), Ray Paczkowski (keys), Jennifer Hartswick (trumpet, vocals), Natalie Cressman (trombone, vocals), and James Casey (saxophones, vocals)—opened up the first set with “Gotta Jibboo” before moving forward with TAB staples “Alive Again” and “Cayman Review”. Despite issues with the stage lighting, the band returned to open up the second set with the instrumental “Mozambique”, which was followed up by TAB staples “Money Love & Change” and “Liquid Time”.center_img Trey Anastasio Band’s newly reworked version of Phish favorite “Camel Walk” was up next before the band sailed into “Ocelot”, allowing Trey a chance to fire off a series of red-hot solos. TAB continued on with “Set Your Soul Free”, “Dark & Down”, and “Tuesday” before closing out the second set with an explosive “First Tube”. The band finally returned to offer up a two-song encore of “Bounce” and “Blaze On”.Trey Anastasio Band returns to Vail’s Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater tonight, Tuesday, August 13th, for the final night of their four-night Colorado run.Head to Trey Anastasio’s website for a full list of his upcoming tour dates, ticketing, and more information.Setlist: Trey Anastasio Band | Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater | Vail, Colorado | 8/12/2019Set One: Gotta Jibboo, Alive Again, Cayman Review, Burn That Bridge, No Men In No Man’s Land, Flying Machines, Everything’s Right, Olivia, SandSet Two: Mozambique, Money Love & Change, Liquid Time, Camel Walk, Ocelot, Set Your Soul Free, Dark & Down, Tuesday, First TubeEncore: Bounce, Blaze Onlast_img read more

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first_imgCulprit’s been teasing the Croz Blade disc brake aero road bike for quite a while now, but they’re finally rolling off the line. We nabbed one of the first production bikes for a quick test before it had to join the demo fleet at Sea Otter.Quick refresher: The Croz Blade is a switch hitter, letting you run TRP’s integrated rim brakes or any disc brake. That’s the attention grabber, but the frame itself has plenty to boast on its own: It’s stiff and fast and reasonably good looking, particularly if you opt for one of the darker graphics packages (my opinion). Even the components, which are designed in conjunction with and made by Trigon, are really nice. While founder Josh Colp hasn’t had a chance to do full wind tunnel testing on the frame, my test rides were in all manner of brutal wind conditions and it was damn fast.With just a couple weeks in the office, the test had to be damn fast, too. The bike had to be built from scratch first, which isn’t usually the case with review bikes. After wrapping up our review of their Arrow One road bike, we ended up keeping the frame as a long term test mule and putting our own bits on it. That group was stripped and awaited install on the Croz Blade. So, this gave us the rare opportunity to weigh each and every bit of the frame and Culprit’s house brand components.Once built, it was off to Florida for a week of coastal flatland riding…UPDATED: 130mm dropouts available, plus photos of bike with rim brakes and more added at bottom of post.FRAME, COMPONENT & BIKE WEIGHTSA size 58 frame with hardware (bottle cage bolts, derailleur hanger and seat collar) came in at 1,214 grams. The fork with a very long uncut steerer is 463g without the cable cover (you’ll see).Culprit’s frames come with their own seatpost (228g), stem (146g) and handlebar (204g). It’s worth noting that Trigon, who manufactures Culprit’s components, also makes parts for some of the top brands in the world and all of these performed quite well.Put it all together with Culprit’s bar tape, 2012 SRAM Red (10-speed), Prologo saddle, Token disc wheels wrapped in Maxxis tires with TRP rotors and Bengal mechanical calipers and you get a 16.4lb  (7l43kg) bike without pedals. Not too shabby for an aero bike with cheap mechanical brakes and deep clincher carbon wheels.DETAILS & INSTALL NOTESThe fork has a mostly UD carbon finish with woven sections at the base of the steerer tube for reinforcement. The backside of the crown is shaped to make the rim brakes flush with the design. If you’re running discs, a cover hides those mounts and the cable.Disc mounting tabs are minimal, and the use of a spacer on the lower mount lets them all but disappear if you’re running rim brakes. The fork blades are thin but quite stiff.The chainstays house cable entry/exit ports, rim brake mounts and Di2/EPS battery mounts. The recesses on the inside edges are for brake pad clearance.All cables and hoses are run internally, and there are plugs/ports for electronic wiring, too. It’s a simple swap to go from mechanical to electronic.Alloy dropouts face the outsides, giving the skewer a stronger clamping area to dig into, and they’re easily replaceable. Like the fork, the disc mounts are pretty minimal, with the rear one hidden behind the seatstay. If you weren’t running discs, most riders wouldn’t even notice the mounts. Hub spacing is 135mm, with adaptive dropouts for 130mm non-disc brake wheels…pics at bottom of post.Culprit’s handlebar has cable tunnels and grooves, making a very nice, round package once it’s taped. The small indent just in front of the shifter mount provided a nice shape for the outside of my palm. His bar and stem are both very, very stiff when sprinting, but they also seemed to damp vibration well enough.All put together, it’s a pretty good looking bike. Head angle on the top three sizes (58 tested, the largest they make) is a race ready 73º. The included seatpost has three positions, which really helps make this bike suit a variety of riders. Set it back and ride like Lemond or push it forward and this could be a great triathlon bike.Even with a full 1.5″ tapered headtube, the frontal profile is fairly sleek. Then the line is run through the cover, which holds it close to the top of the crown. It looks good, but creates another tight bend, giving that section of housing a tight “S” bend. On the bottom, the housing pops out pretty low, putting more bends and tension in the line and making it difficult to feed it straight into the Bengal caliper’s stop. Different mechanical calipers (TRP Spyres come to mind) might have a better angle, but this really illustrates why hydraulics are the way to go here.The rear brake’s assembly was a bit easier, but this cable required installation before inserting the fork. Check the pics of the head tube further up and you’ll see that being able to reach into the frame and guide the housing out of the hole at the top is the easiest way to do it. The full length housing did create some cable drag, another ill remedied by going to hydraulics. I take the time to mention all this because not everyone will pony up for hydros…the bike will work fine with mechanicals, just choose some really slick cables and housing. RIP Gore Cables! Just as I did with the Arrow One, I came away impressed by the Croz Blade. My only real complaints were during installation, once I had it on the road, they disappeared. Josh has been helping develop bikes for others for years, and it shows in the ride quality.Perhaps you’ve noticed I haven’t mentioned the disc brakes yet. They’re an aside. Get good brakes and braking performance should be good. The Bengals were acceptable, but by no means the best mechs I’ve ridden – stopping power was adequate for Florida’s flat roads, but I’d want SRAM’s new hydros if I were heading to the mountains. The point of offering disc or TRP’s TTV cantilevers is simply to be choice, but that novelty will wear off and shouldn’t be the selling point for this bike.Instead, I’d say the rock solid ride and seemingly impressive aerodynamics are the qualities I’d appreciate mile after mile. And, if I were into triathlon (I’ve done a couple), this would be a great choice for something to ride and train on everyday, then slap some aero extensions on it for race day and move the saddle forward.If you get a chance to demo a Culprit, I’d recommend giving it a whirl.UPDATES: Another problem with mechanicals (depending on model) is potential heel clearance. Granted, I wear a size 47/13US, but something to be aware of. Honestly, I never really noticed any rubbing, but everyone’s riding style is different.More pics of the cable routing. Like the Arrow One, this bike is stiff. Really stiff, particularly at the headtube and bottom bracket. Stand up and hammer, crank the bike from side to side, or just perform the ol’ shimmy-the-handle-bar-and-watch-for-flex test. Give it your worst, and I bet you’ll find the same thing I did. It’s rock solid.Combined with the deep-ish carbon wheels, the bike rolled along with that hollow carbon hum so common on triathlon bikes with full disc rear wheels. Not quite as loud, but present. And the overall feel was one of a tri bike’s ruthless efficiency, except with road geometry. Crit racer geometry, but road geometry nonetheless.My route in Florida revolves around Ormond Beach’s Loop Ride and other popular north-south roads throughout Flagler and Bunnell. They’re quite flat, save for the Granada Bridge, but run the gamut from heat-cracked old pavement to smooth, fresh asphalt. And the winds typically show up on at least one side of the river, often times on both and magically switching direction all too often. So, my test rides had headwinds, side winds and tail winds, some upwards of 15mph. Regardless of wind direction or speed, I felt fast on the Croz Blade and was able to hold higher-than-normal speeds for me, by what seemed to be 1-2 mph faster on average.Even with the stiff frame and seatpost, the bike did a decent job of mitigating road noise. Cracks and bumps transmitted fairly directly, but the constant buzz of old roads seemed damped a bit. Here’s what the rim brakes look like installed, and with Di2. The stem is simply massive, with a wide clamping area. It works great, but the hole on top and bottom between bolts and behind the handlebar creates a gap. While you’re set up may differ, this one created wind noise similar to blowing across the top of a Coke bottle. A piece of electrical tape over the bottom hole fixed the issue, but it took a while to figure out where the wind noise was coming from!The bottom bracket section and chainstays are stout, which translated into impressive stiffness. The bike is made for PFBB30, but the group we had was GXP, so we needed adapters.Aaaahhh, the cable routing. The drivetrain routing is fine, and installation is straightforward. No complaints there, though it’s worth mentioning that if you cross the housing in front of the headtube, the cables will cross each other inside the frame. But the brakes…Colp says this bike was absolutely designed with hydraulic disc brakes in mind. The mechanical brakes shown here stuck out a bit from the side, but something like the new SRAM Hydro disc calipers would streamline it quite a bit. Appearances and aerodynamics aside, the cable routing for the discs would absolutely benefit from being run with hydraulic hose rather than cable and housing:The front brake’s housing had to be fed up from the bottom and caught in a loop to pull it out of the hole just above the cantilever brake mount. This created a pretty tight radius curve, which seemed to add friction to the line. RIDE REVIEW The bike comes with both sets of brakes, and as the hydraulic models become available, those will be options. Note that these are TRP’s new Spyre mechs, which weren’t available at the time we received our test bike.Culprit is offering a promo through May 17, 2013, on both the Croz Blade and Arrow One. Hit the links for PDF special order forms. More info at CulpritBicycles.com.last_img read more

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first_imgDesert Cove (Photo courtesy of Marcus & Millichap)Marcus & Millichap (NYSE: MMI), a commercial real estate investment services firm with Phoenix offices, completed the sale of Tucson apartments, the Desert Cove, a 70-unit apartment property.Don Morrow, regional manager of the firm’s Phoenix office, said the asset sold for $3,120,000.Hamid Panahi, James Crawley, Cliff David and Steve Gebing, investment specialists in Marcus & Millichap’s Phoenix office, had the exclusive listing to market the property on behalf of the seller, a limited liability company.Desert Cove is located at 1201 N. Alvernon Way in Tucson.last_img read more

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first_imgShare on Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn “In this study, we found changes primarily in brain regions connected to sensation and sensory processing,”said co-principal investigator Kevin J. Black, MD, a professor of psychiatry.Differences in those brain regions make sense, Black said, because many people with Tourette’s explain that their tics occur mainly as a response to unusual sensations. The feeling that a part of the body doesn’t seem right, for example, prompts an involuntary sigh, vocalization, cough or twitch.“Just as you or I might cough or sneeze due to a cold, a person with Tourette’s frequently will have a feeling that something is wrong, and the tic makes it feel better,” Black said. “A young man who frequently clears his throat may report that doing so is a reaction to a tickle or some other unusual sensation in his throat. Or a young woman will move her shoulder when it feels strange, and the movement, which is a tic, will make the shoulder feel better.”In the largest study of its kind, the researchers conducted MRI scans at four U.S. sites to study the brains of 103 children with Tourette’s and compared them with scans of another 103 kids of the same age and sex but without the disorder. The scans of the children with Tourette’s revealed significantly more gray matter in the thalamus, the hypothalamus and the midbrain than in those without the disorder.The gray matter is where the brain processes information. It’s made up mainly of cells such as neurons, glial cells and dendrites, as well as axons that extend from neurons to carry signals.In kids with Tourette’s, the researchers also found less white matter around the orbital prefrontal cortex, just above the eyes, and in the medial prefrontal cortex, also near the front, than in kids without the condition.White matter acts like the brain’s wiring. It consists of axons that — unlike the axons in gray matter — are coated with myelin and transmit signals to the gray matter. Less white matter could mean less efficient transmission of sensations, whereas extra gray matter could mean nerve cells are sending extra signals.Black said it’s not possible to know yet whether the extra gray matter is transmitting information that somehow contributes to tics or whether reduced amounts of white matter elsewhere in the brains of kids with Tourette’s may somehow influence the movements and vocalizations that characterize the disorder. But he said that discovering these changes in the brain could give scientists new targets to better understand and treat Tourette’s.“This doesn’t tell us what happened to make the brain look this way,” Black explained. “Are there missing cells in certain places, or are the cells just smaller? And are these regions changing as the brain tries to resist tics? Or are the differences we observed contributing to problems with tics? We simply don’t know the answers yet.”Black said the researchers will aim to replicate these findings in additional patients and determine if and how the brain regions they identified may contribute to Tourette’s syndrome, with a goal of developing more effective therapies. Share on Facebookcenter_img Using MRIs, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified areas in the brains of children with Tourette’s syndrome that appear markedly different from the same areas in the brains of children who don’t have the neuropsychiatric disorder.The findings are available online Oct. 25 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.Tourette’s syndrome is defined by tics — involuntary, repetitive movements and vocalizations. Scientists estimate that the condition affects roughly one to 10 kids out of every 1,000 children. Email Sharelast_img read more

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first_imgEmily Smith Gilbert has been named the new editor-in-chief of The Southampton Review. Independent/Courtesy TSRStony Brook Southampton has marked two milestones this week for the Winter/Spring 2019 edition of TSR: The Southampton Review. The first is the publication of Vol. XIII, No. 1 of the literary and art journal. The second is the formal announcement of Emily Smith Gilbert as the new editor-in-chief.“Emily is wonderful, thoughtful, and an absolute delight to work with,” TSR founding Editor-in-Chief Lou Ann Walker said in a recent interview. “She is passionate about literature and the arts and making statements about what is important in the world.”Gilbert, who earned her MFA at Stony Brook Southampton in December 2015, worked on TSR as an editorial assistant while getting her degree, then as a contributing editor, and then managing editor last year.At Walker’s behest, in 2017 Gilbert wrote a grant to fund the redesign of TSR’s website. The grant from the Community of Literary Magazines and Presses enabled her to create TSR Online, which had long been a goal of the journal’s editors and publishers.“Moving forward with TSR, I plan to continue its mission to publish emerging authors alongside established names, as well as seeking out writing that engages with the political and cultural moment,” Gilbert told The Independent.The updated website, at www.thesouthamptonreview.com/tsronline/, showcases exclusive works that are generally shorter than those in the print journal, along with reprints of pieces from the print edition. The online journal also features original poetry and photography. Submissions are open essentially all year at thesouthamptonreview.com/submit, although editors have requested that people only submit once every six months so they can manage the flow.For the new print issue, Gilbert worked closely with Walker — now the Director of the MFA in Creative Writing and Literature program — as the two have done for every edition over the past three years. The new editor-in-chief said that she is very grateful to have Walker as someone she can “always turn to and have that resource for a second opinion.”Going forward, Gilbert will be working with a team that includes Fiction Editor Amy Hempel, Poetry Editor Cornelius Eady, Associate Editor Vanessa Cuti, and Editorial Assistants Paige Chadwick and Jesi Halprin, who are both MFA students.In fiction, Gilbert singled out as one of the high points a short story, “For the Roses” by Cally Fiedorek, about a group of friends celebrating a 60th birthday at the Kentucky Derby. “This story has everything I look for in a short story,” Gilbert said. “World building, the creation of authentic characters, and taking you somewhere you have never been.”Other notable fiction pieces in this edition include Jake Lancaster’s first published story, “Holograms,” and “Shovelbums” by Amber Caron, which Gilbert called “a story for our times.”Memoir highlights in the new edition include “Hesitation,” a first memoir piece by Doug Neagoy, and “There Is Still Something To Be Done” by Esther Entin.“Hesitation” explores the experience of saving the life of a surfer, the hesitations that punctuate the process, and the internal conflicts that underlie those hesitations. “There Is Still Something To Be Done” deals with the author’s work as a resident in a pediatric ICU at a time when she was the only female resident on the unit. Despite her utter exhaustion while living almost completely encased in the medical world, there is always more to be done when working with children suffering from horrific health problems.Poetry selections in the new edition include “Lake” by Cornelia Channing, which came to TSR through the efforts of Poetry Editor Cornelius Eady. The issue has three poems by Billy Collins, and poems by Major Jackson and Michelle Whittaker, among others.The new edition of TSR features the winners of this year’s Short Short Fiction Prize; Tara Isabel Zambrano won first place for her story, “New Old.”Cartoons in the new issue include “Friendship” by Andrew Dicus, and works from previous contributors Matt Collins and Grant Snider.In addition to the front cover art, “Blue Cat,” and other works by Endre Penovác, other art in this issue was created by Pamela Singh, Star Black, Ilir Pojani, and Jamea Richmond-Edwards.Gilbert announced this week that the price of TSR has been reduced to $15 for an individual copy; $28 for a one-year subscription (two issues). The new issue of TSR will be available for reading at local libraries. Some pieces in the new issue will be posted on TSR Online. Copies may be purchased on the TSR website, with Gilbert noting that TSR “makes a great Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, birthday, or host or hostess gift.”Submissions for the Summer/Fall 2019 TSR print edition will be accepted from February 1 to April 1, 2019. Submissions for the Frank McCourt memoir prize, with the winner to be published in the Summer/Fall edition, will be accepted February 15 to March 15, 2019.For more information, visit the TSR website, [email protected] Sharelast_img read more

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