first_imgThe CPR classes follow AHA standards. Using the mannequins, students learn the proper placement of hands for chest compressions and how to tilt the head, lift the chin and do rescue breathing. The department teaches a CPR class each month. There is no charge for the classes, but if students want a CPR certification card from the American Heart Association, they must pay $10. “This brings us up to 16 mannequins. If you have one mannequin per two people, you can teach a whole class at once,” Nasby said. They teach the classes once a month in the Community Building, which is next door to the fire department on Tyler Mountain Road. “We have a brand-new one that we just took delivery of last Tuesday. Our goal is to have one of these on every truck,” Nasby said. TYLER MOUNTAIN, W. Va. For the past three years, the Tyler Mountain Volunteer Fire Department has conducted free, community classes in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The portable defibrillators, or AEDs, are “popping up everywhere” in malls, churches and airports, so it’s good to know how to use them, he said.center_img CPR students are also taught how to use portable, electronic defibrillators, which deliver electric shocks to the heart. “The fire department makes nothing, but we do accept donations,” he said. Nasby’s partners in the CPR classes are fire department members Randy McGrew and Fred Tillis Jr. Recently, the fire department acquired eight new CPR mannequins, which are used to demonstrate the proper way to administer CPR to heart attack victims. During each four-hour class, the students also learn how to recognize the symptoms of a heart attack or stroke.last_img read more

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first_imgRecording of the all hands high angle rescue box 8084 that occured on 11/12/14 in Borough, New York. In the lower right corner you will see a timelapse shot of the scaffolding (rescue at 19:00). Please note the audio and video are not 100% synchronized. Please note that the recording is edited, but other incidents in the borough can also be heard. Follow NYC Fire Wire for FDNY news and fires https://www.facebook.com/nycfirewire2 Sound provided by Broadcastify.comlast_img

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore120,000 letters arrive yearly from dozens of countries having made their way to the small town of North Pole, Alaska. “They usually get a reply and a North Pole postmark in a holiday effort that has delighted children all over the world for decades.” (AP) …And, here are a few excerpts from Santa’s letters from children… curious about the facts and eager to show they’ve been good. (AP)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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first_imgEditor’s note: This is the first installment in a three-part series discussing the Rutagengwa family’s search for God from the 1994 Rwandan genocide in light of their trip back to Rwanda in December. To remain true to their experience, this piece contains graphic content.To mark the 20th anniversary of the 1994 Rwandan genocide, in which 1 million people were killed in 100 days, a group including theology professors Fr. Dan Groody and Fr. Virgil Elizondo and project coordinator for the Institute of Latino Studies Colleen Cross accompanied survivors Jean Bosco Rutagengwa and Christine Rutagengwa to their home country in December to explore the search for God during genocide.Groody, who organized the trip, said its goal was to bring together a “community of friends” to address the issue of finding God in seemingly hopeless situations.“We wanted more than to just see a pious Band-Aid over a very painful, difficult reality,” Groody said. “We wanted to see how people really helped rebuild their lives after such violence … and how you begin to think about that theologically.”Groody, whose primary research area is migration theology, said Christine Rutagengwa reached out to him two years ago after he gave a talk about Rwandan refugees. She introduced Groody to her husband, Jean Bosco Rutagengwa, who wanted to write a book about the search for God from his personal experience seeking refuge in the Hotel Mille Collines, also known as the Hotel Rwanda.“I said, ‘Where was God for you during that time?’” Groody said. “And [Jean Bosco] says, ‘Well, I remember one instance in particular where they cut off all the water sources and we had started to drink out of the swimming pool. And at one point there was no water left, but amidst our desperation that we thought we were going to run dry, it then started to rain. God for me was in the rain.’”The Rutagengwas, whose daughter Fiona Rutagengwa is a freshman at Notre Dame, spent 40 days in the Hotel Mille Collines, the inspiration for the movie “Hotel Rwanda,” where more than a thousand Tutsi refugees sought shelter during the genocide, Groody said. Photo courtesy of Dan Groody Fr. Dan Groody stands with survivors of the 1994 Rwandan genocide in December. While in Rwanda, Groody visited victims’ memorials and met with community leaders seeking to rebuild their country.During the trip, the group stayed at the hotel — the Rutagengwas’ first visit there since they fled 19 years ago — and visited important memorials for genocide victims, Groody said.“When you go out to these memorials, they had all kinds of different models,” he said. “One would [display] the skulls and the bones, and you can just pick them up. They’re right there. And then there were others where they would say, ‘Here are the vaults,’ and there are 200,000 people in this vault, 200,000 people in that vault. … It wasn’t as graphic as the first model.“The third, which was really disturbing … [showed] how they died, and then they took this lime and they basically preserved the bones, some of which still had hair on them. The most disturbing one was I think the rape. You’d see this woman who had been raped and kind of thrown into this pit.”The group also visited Christine Rutagengwa’s childhood parish, the site of a brutal killing spree, Groody said.“It’s a church that is a memorial for the genocide, and in the back it’s just skulls and bones,” he said. “[Christine] said, ‘This is where I went to Sunday school. This is where they rounded up my mother and my sisters, and they macheted and threw grenades and they macheted 5,000 people in a couple of hours.’“Some French brigade group trained the killers how to kill 1,000 people in 20 minutes.”Groody said churches were popular targets for those carrying out the genocide.“There were previous genocides in Rwanda, but in those previous times, people fled to the churches for refuge, literally for protection,” he said. “But this time, the killers knew they were going to do that, so then they targeted the churches, then rounded them up there and threw grenades in there and hacked them to death or took their kids, their babies, and smashed their heads against the wall. The numbers were just astronomical.”Groody said he held Mass at many of the memorials, including the place where Jean Bosco Rutagengwa’s mother was buried.Along the way, Groody said the group met people who proved that new life had emerged in Rwanda, including a nun who had harbored 22 refugees in her house during the genocide. Despite her best efforts, the killers found them and murdered them, even burying one person alive, he said.“This dog they had was a very mean dog, but the dog one day — after they had killed [the refugee] and put him in this grave — the dog kept whimpering and crying, and he kept going back and forth between the grave and the house,” Groody said.“What he was trying to say is there’s somebody still alive there. And [the nun’s] comment was that in many ways, this dog showed more humanity than the people, which is interesting for my work because when I ask migrants what is the hardest part about being a migrant, one of them said it’s being treated like you’re a dog.“But in this case, it even takes that further that sometimes a dog can be even more human than people or show more humanity than human beings do.”Groody said even though the nun suffered terrible losses, she also said she had a responsibility to cultivate goodness.“She said, when we asked ‘What is the message of Rwanda for the world?’ ‘Rwanda descended lower than anyone could possibly go. As a human community, we went lower than anybody could possibly go,’” Groody said. “‘Neighbor turned against neighbor. People in the same church started killing each other, parents against children. We went so low that you couldn’t get any lower.’“But it was from that point that she realized that her mission was to be a messenger of light and hope and to put goodness back on its throne.”Groody said he also met a priest named Fr. Jerome who sought to rebuild his community after the genocide.“[Fr. Jerome] realized that he had to do more than keep saying Mass for people,” Groody said. “He started a support group, and they came in and started telling their story. He says the stories were all the same. ‘They killed X, Y and Z. Why did God let this happen?’ Because it’s very hard for people to get beyond their own pain and suffering.“But he said at one point he asked them, ‘Was there anything good that happened at any time during the genocide? Did you experience anybody do a good act for you or anything that you feel grateful for?’ And he says that kind of opened a door and it just changed the perspective and people began talking about where God was in the midst of that.”Groody said hearing these survivors’ stories changed the way he approaches finding God in hopeless places.“Before I left, I had a lot of questions,” he said. “When we got there and started talking to people, I began analyzing it. We got further into the questions to try to understand things.“As I started hearing people’s stories, I became more and more quiet, and then once you start hearing these things, you’re just speechless. And by the end you’re crying. You just don’t have words that even begin to touch this. You really kind of have to shift your theology in a way from just saying, ‘Where was God?’ to ‘Where were we?’”Jean Bosco Rutagengwa wrote a book about his search for God, framed around life, death and resurrection, to be published later this year, and Groody said the group is working to release a documentary about their trip to be released around the 20th anniversary of the genocide in April.“The greatest takeaway for me is that there are living witnesses that bear testimony to a God of life in midst of death, and whose own ability to believe amidst the unbelievable is a compelling narrative of how God is with us, even amidst the most challenging situations we face,” he said. “It’s one thing if we say this from places like [Notre Dame], and it’s another thing when you’re with people who say it from places like [Rwanda].”last_img read more

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first_img When the Cowboys tangled with the Eagles Saturday aftenoon, it marked only the third time Dallas has played at home on Christmas Eve. One of those two, on Dec. 24, 1989 against Green Bay, remains at the top of Jimmy Johnson’s list of least favorite memories during a five-year, two Super Bowl tenure as the Cowboys’ head coach. With fewer than 30,000 fans in the stands, the Packers won 20-10 in 23-degree temperatues at Texas Stadium, leaving the Cowboys with a 1-15 record in Johnson’s first season. According to a story in the Dec. 24 issue of Dallas Cowboys Star, Jimmy was so bummed out and drained from what he endured in that first NFL season, he flew to Bermuda by himself the following day and spent a week on the beaches there without communicating with anybody. Apparently nobody, not even Jerry Jones, knew where he was. Upon his return, JJ refused to utter the words one and 15 and still won’t . . . One of Dallas’ biggest challenges against Philadephia Saturday — this column was written before the game — was keeping Eagles defensive end Jason Babin off Tony Romo. Babin went into the game with 18 sacks and had an outside chance to break Michael Strahan’s all-time NFL single-season record. While Babin’s name might not resonate with a lot of NFL followers, it makes Houston Texans fans ill. The Texans traded second, third, fourth and fifth round picks to Tennessee in order to move up to 27th in the first round in 2004 so they could take Babin. During three inglorious years in Houston, Babin managed a total of 13 sacks — or five less than he had through the first 14 games of this season. Ultimately, he was traded to Seattle for a defensive back named Michael Boulware. At this point in time, Babin is arguably the Texans’ most successful No. 1 pick, albeit with all his success being in a different uniform.There’s an interesting subplot for Lamar’s visit to No. 3 Kentucky Wednesday night, a game that’s being televised on ESPNU. Fired LU coach Steve Roccaforte was Kentucky boss John Calipari’s recruiting ace while at Memphis, Calipari lobbied for Roc to get the Lamar job and later made a trip to Beaumont to speak at the Cardinals’ preseason banquet. With Roc having burned some bridges on the way out the door, contending that he was mistreated at Lamar, you have to think he gave Calipari an earful. So the question is whether the Kentucky coach will pile it on Wednesday night, if he gets the chance. Adding fuel to the fire is the fact Bob Knight has trashed Calipari’s coaching methods more than once. Pat Knight, however, claims he has a good relationship with Calipari. We’ll see . . . As one who spent many, many hours covering games and writing about the achievements of Bum Phillips and Little Joe Washington, it’s going to be gratifying seeing them inducted into the sixth Texas Bowl Gridiron Legends Class next Saturday in Reliant Stadium at halftime of Texas A&M’s clash with Northwestern in the Meinike Car Care Bowl. Bum and Little Joe are two of my all-time favorites and two of the greatest sports achievers to come out of Southeast Texas. It’s so appropriate they are being inducted with Lone Star State football heaveyweights like Texas A&M legend John David Crow, Houston Oilers QB Dan Pastorini, Texans owner Bob McNair and former Katy High School coach Mike Johnston. My only real regret for Bum was that the Pittsburgh Steelers dynasty of the 1970s kept him out of a Super Bowl. For Joe, the regret was that Oklahoma’s probation in 1974 cost him the TV exposure that would have helped him win the Heisman Trophy. Next to missing a season in which he would likely have solidified himself as one of the NFL’s best, most explosive running backs, and having to go through the pain associated with ACL rehab, the worst thing about his knee injury for Memorial ex Jamaal Charles has been putting with irate Fantasy Football fanatics who took him high in their drafts. “I’m starting to hate fantasy,” Charles recently said. “People are criticizing me like I wanted to get hurt. A lot of people come up to me and say like, ‘You caused my season to be messed up.’ I’m like, man, I have a real-life situation. It’s not a fake situation. It’s a real life situation than can affect my whole family.” . . . Tim Tebow mania, as you may have noticed, is clearly out of control. NBC’s Saturday Night Live did an hilarious spoof last week with Tebow and Jesus in the Broncos locker room, and now is trying to land him as the third NFL QB — Peyton Manning and Tom Brady are the others — to host the show. Also, last week in Bartow, Fla., an uproar was triggered after an anonymous person put a cardboard cutout of Tebow alongside the city’s Christmas Nativity scene. The cutout was quickly removed, but a citizen protest soon followed Tebow being sacked. Eventually the cutout was put back in the manger as a wise man, along with a disclaimer sign saying Tebow was not placed there or endorsed by the county. God help us if Tebow ever leads the Broncos to a Super Bowl . . . Where else but JerryWorld could a coach celebrating a state championship, and a sportswriter getting quotes from him in the aftermath, get run down by an unmanned golf cart, as happened last Saturday night following Spring Dekaney’s 5A title victory over Cibolo Steele? Jethro should be thankful that wasn’t Memorial’s Kenny Harrison and me standing at midfield. I’d have sued in heartbeat. After Thursday night’s clunker in Indianapolis, it’s difficult to be optimistic about the Houston Texans in the playoffs. With rookie QB T.J. Yates running the offense, and their only deep threat, Andre Johnson, on the sidelines with a hamstring injury, the Texans are simply too easy to defend, and they wind up leaving the defense on the field too long. It may be time for Texans coach Gary Kubiak to consider going with one of the two veteran QB’s on the roster — Jake Delhomme or Jeff Garcia. Then, again, if Johnson can’t play and Wade Phillips isn’t back to run the defense, the Texas may not be able to beat anybody. One final thought on the Thursday loss at Indy. Two of the personal fouls whistled on rookie J.J. Watt against Colts QB Dan Orlovsky were as lame as I’ve ever seen. And the second played a factor in the Colts winning drive . . . Here’s hoping that Sugar Bowl folks, and all the other elitists in college football, are happy over relegating one of the nation’s top five teams, Boise State, to the out-of-sight, out of mind Maaco Bowl. By again snubbing Boise, the game’s power brokers denied college football fans a game worth watching against Michigan, instead of a ho hummer between the Wolverines and Virginia Tech. Relegated to a bowl few people saw Thursday night in Las Vegas, the Broncos did what they always do to a BCS opponent, splattering Arizona State 56-24. That made their record over the last four years 50-3, including 6-0 against teams from BCS leagues. Two of their three losses were by one point and the other by three. Victims included eventual Pac 10 champ Oregon in 2009, eventual ACC champ Virginia Tech in 2010 and SEC East champ Georgia in 2011. There would have been more top dogs embarrassed but everybody ran from scheduling Boise. Then the Broncos kept getting snubbed by the big bowls, further protecting the elite.Sports editor Bob West can be e-mailed at [email protected]center_img Merry Christmas to all this column’s faithful readers. Hopefully, Santa delivered exactly what you wanted. Meanwhile, even on Dec. 25, there’s much to discuss in the wild and crazy world of sports.LU basketball Pat Knight, clearly disappointed at the way his team played in a 70-50 loss to No. 2 ranked Ohio State Tuesday night, was surprised at the reaction of dad, Bob Knight, after the game. “Other than us throwing up too many outside jump shots, he liked a lot of what he saw,” said the younger Knight. “He was really impressed with how hard our kids competed, how tough we defended them and how we got on the boards.” On Monday, the elder Knight had spoken at length to Cardinal players in the locker room, watched their practice and, with Pat’s encouragement, got involved. One point he made to Lamar’s guards was that they weren’t stepping into their shots. Later, he took photos with all the players. . . . Those who watched the Lamar-Ohio State telecast on the Big Ten Network heard a lot of positive things said about the Cardinals by BTN analyst Jim Jackson. Turns out the former Ohio State All-America, who was the fourth player picked in the 1992 NBA draft by Dallas, attended some Five-Star basketball camps many years ago with Pat Knight, then played against him when Pat was at Indiana. At Knight’s invitation, Jackson also spoke to Cardinal players, with his theme that they need to make the most of the college experience and bear down in the classroom. “We didn’t pull off an upset, but between the talks from my dad and Jim Jackson, and the TV exposure, there was a lot of good for Lamar that came from playing Ohio State,” said Pat. “I guess I took how the game played out worse than other people because I don’t believe in moral victories.”last_img read more

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first_imgGlas za Zadar tijekom 20 dana izbora za destinaciju godine, na uglednom belgijskom portalu “European Best Destinations” kojega prati oko 2,5 milijuna ljudi, došao je gotovo sa svih svjetskih kontinenata, a jedan glas podrške hrvatskom i mediteranskom biseru stigao je čak s Bahama. Glasalo je nikad više ljudi: ukupno 288,992 ili 17,9 posto više nego 2015., dok je Zadar kao pobjednik izbora dobio također rekordnih 57,616 glasova, od čega je 53,4 posto glasova stiglo izvan Hrvatske. Veseli činjenica kako je pola glasova stiglo izvan Hrvatske, nadam se kako će ti glasovi u sljedećoj turističkoj sezoni doći u Zadar i tako postati dio priče kojoj su dali glas.When we talk about free promotion only during the election campaign in 20 days, Zadar was directly or indirectly mentioned in more than 780 newspaper articles and more than 6400 comments with 118,487 shares or so-called shares on Facebook pages, and the massive mobilization included 96,875 new likes.Last year’s winner Bordeaux had a 16 per cent growth in tourismKakve turističke rezultate izbor EBD portala može donijeti pobjedniku, u ovogodišnjem slučaju Zadru? – pitanje je na koje ćemo odgovor dobiti početkom sljedeće godine, kada se turistički promet i ukupno poimanje turizma u Zadru stavi pod povećalo. Kako se to laskavo priznanje i vrhunska turistička preporuka može pretočiti u uspjeh pokazao je primjer Bordeauxa, prošlogodišnjeg pobjednika izbora za najbolju europsku destinaciju. Ukupni turistički promet u Bordeauxu povećao se za gotovo 16 place, dok je broj međunarodnih dolazaka zabilježenih na aerodromu “Bordeaux Merignac Airport” porastao za 10,7 place. Prvi čovjek turizma u Bordeauxu Nicolas Martin pohvalio se još jednom činjenicom proizašlom iz prošlogodišnje pobjede Bordeauxa u izboru za najbolju europsku destinaciju portala “European Best Destinations” „ Revenues per room in all categories of hotels in Bordeaux increased by as much as 12,26 percent, with significantly higher arrivals of guests from Britain, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, Belgium and Italy.”Nicolas Martin points out.Zahvaljujući društvenim mrežama i kampanji #BirajZadar koju je volonterski vodila skupina mladih entuzijasta u suradnji s TZ Zadra, Zadar su podržale, među ostalima, i velike svjetske sportske zvijezde Luka Modrić i Colllin Jackson te svjetski top model Helena Šopar, a svoj glas Zadru dao je i velika japanska televizijska zvijezda, masterchef  Toshihiro Nakatsuji.The Zadar Tourist Board took great advantage of the opportunity, regardless of the final result, and created a positive buzz through social media. For this purpose, special promotional visuals, videos, websites were created and the reach of the entire campaign was impressive – a total of 780 journalistic articles that generated free PR and when we add up the reach via social networks, we can certainly say that a great job was done.The story is just beginningBut this story is not the end, in fact, it is just the beginning. On the example of Bordeaux, we saw the potential in increasing tourist traffic, and for Tz Zadar the work is just beginning. It is necessary to justify this flattering title of the best European tourist destination, but also to generate growth in both tourist arrivals and tourist traffic.”The city and the Tourist Board will continue to invest even more in public areas and infrastructure, in programs and further presentation and branding of Zadar. In a word, more and more people will invest in tourism at all levels, so its quality will be better and better.”Said Dražen Grgurović, Deputy President of the Tourist Board of the City Tourist BoardWe hope that Zadar is aware of the potential and opportunities and that only now they need to increase investment in tourism at all levels. The conclusion is clear: Zadar has made good use of the opportunity offered to it, but the real work is only just beginning.last_img read more

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first_imgPinterest LinkedIn Email Share on Facebook Share on Twittercenter_img Opting for smaller rewards immediately instead of waiting for bigger payoffs later is associated with problems such as impulsivity and addiction to food, drugs and alcohol. Now, new research indicates that such decision-making tendencies have a genetic link to brain pathways that underlie these disorders.The researchers, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, report their findings Tuesday, Dec. 8, at the annual meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, in Hollywood, Fla.Studying adolescent twins, the researchers found that genes linked to the brain’s serotonin and kappa opioid receptors — neuronal receptors associated with mood, depression and addiction — also play a role in whether a person will choose an immediate reward over a more sizeable payoff later. The scientists also learned that adolescents become slightly more likely to accept delayed rewards as they age but that those who prefer immediate rewards tend to continue choosing quick payoffs. Share “Every day we make decisions about obtaining immediate gains, which come at the cost of delayed but larger advantages,” said principal investigator Andrey Anokhin, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry. “We found that many such decisions are explained by genetic factors that also are related to mood and impulsivity.”Anokhin’s team studied 310 adolescent identical or fraternal twin pairs and asked them questions about money. At 12 years of age, and again at age 14, they were given the choice of receiving $7 immediately or $10 in the mail two weeks later. At age 12, 35 percent decided to take $7 right away instead of more money later. That number fell to 27.5 percent when the same kids were presented the scenario at age 14.In subsequent experiments at ages 16, 18 and 20, the same subjects were offered hypothetical monetary rewards, $80 now or $100 six months from now, for example.“We vary the amount of the reward available immediately, the amount of the delayed reward and the time they would have to wait,” Anokhin said. “If you offer someone the choice between $95 today or $100 in six months, most people would rather have the cash immediately. But what if the choice is between $85 today or $100 in three months? At that point, some people prefer delaying the reward to make an extra $15.”Because the adolescent study subjects were twins, the researchers were able to use mathematical formulas to analyze the impact of genetic factors on their decisions. The scientists looked at several genes previously linked to impulsivity and substance use.First, they found that serotonin genes were involved. But a closer look indicated that genes related to kappa opioid receptors on brain cells appeared to be even more crucial in making these decisions, Anokhin explained.“The top three genes we’ve identified so far are linked to those receptors,” he said.Serotonin genes and kappa opioid receptor genes are connected to mood. In animal studies, both types of receptors have been linked to behaviors associated with depression and addiction, and Anokhin said the new research indicates they also appear linked to whether a person chooses immediate over delayed rewards.When an individual doesn’t want to wait for a larger reward, that could be an indication that the person is impulsive, Anokhin said. Impulsivity increases the risk for problems such as alcoholism, drug addiction and obesity.As twins in the study have aged, Anokhin and his colleagues have begun looking for possible connections between this sort of decision-making and binge drinking, drug use and nicotine dependence.“We need to look more closely before drawing conclusions, but we want to see what the consequences of the differences we’ve identified are for real-life behaviors,” he said.last_img read more

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first_img Study finds infection control gaps among medical students, residentsA survey of medical students and residents at an urban hospital during the H1N1 influenza pandemic suggests that although they took seriously the risk of becoming infected, they didn’t always comply with infection control precautions, researchers from George Washington University report in the September issue of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses. They polled the doctors in training with an anonymous online survey that produced 194 responses from medical students and 67 from residents. The survey was conducted between Nov 3 and Dec 11, 2009. About half of each group perceived that they had a high risk of becoming infected with the virus at school or work. The pandemic vaccination rate was 43% for medical students and 66% for residents. Most reported that they increased their use of nonpharmaceutical measures for reducing spread of the virus. However, 9% of medical students and 61% of residents said they went to school or work when they had flu-like symptoms. The authors concluded that immunization rates could be higher in these two groups and that some aren’t observing infection control precautions. They suggest that infection control guidelines should be included in medical education and resident training.Sep Influenza Other Respi Viruses abstract Aug 18, 2010 Flu activity strains New Zealand hospitalA surge in people presenting with flu-like illness at a New Zealand hospital’s emergency department on Aug 16 almost prompted the facility to trigger its crisis plan, the Bay of Plenty Times reported today. Bay of Plenty is on the northern coast of New Zealand’s North Island. An official with the Bay of Plenty District Health Board told the Times that the emergency department saw 182 patients during a 24-hour period that started at 8 am on Aug 16. He said 66 of the patients were admitted to the hospital. Crisis measures would have included, for example, discharging patients early and canceling elective surgeries. New Zealand is among the countries currently reporting high levels of pandemic H1N1 activity. Elsewhere in the country, a primary school in Christchurch, the largest city on New Zealand’s South Island, closed after one of its students was diagnosed with the H1N1 virus. The school’s janitors are disinfecting surfaces at the school, including tables, chairs, and computers.Aug 18 Bay of Plenty Times storyAug 18 Radio Australia News reportcenter_img Finland checks suspected link between narcolepsy and pandemic vaccineExperts in Finland are meeting today to explore a suspected link between narcolepsy and the pandemic H1N1 vaccine, according to a report from YLE, Finland’s national broadcasting system. The suspicion of a link arose when a Finnish pediatric neurologist noted a slight increase in narcolepsy cases this year. The report said a similar pattern has been noted in Sweden. Tehri Kilpi, director of the National Institute for Health and Welfare’s vaccine department, told YLE that she doubted the existence of a connection but said the question should be examined.Aug 18 YLE storylast_img read more

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first_imgAnimal health officials in Ukraine reported the country’s first highly pathogenic H5N8 avian flu outbreaks, with detections in both wild birds and poultry, as Egypt reported another outbreak involving the same virus in poultry.Ukraine, 4 other nations report more outbreaksUkrainian officials reported three outbreaks, one involving a wild bird found dead on Jan 1 and two in poultry that began 2 days later, one at a farm and one in backyard birds, according to separate reports to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). In late November the country reported a few H5 outbreaks and said testing was under way to determine the subtype.The detection in wild birds came after 23 mute swans died near the city of Chortoryia in Chernovtsky province, located in southwestern Ukraine.One of the poultry outbreaks occurred in backyard birds near where H5N8 killed the wild swans, and the other occurred at a farm in Odessa province, also in southwestern Ukraine. Between the two poultry events the virus killed 1,113 of 10,288 susceptible birds, and the remaining ones were destroyed as a control measure.In other European developments involving H5N8, according to new OIE reports:Poland reported two more poultry outbreaks, one in backyard birds in Malopolske province and one at a farm in Dolnoslaskie province, both in the far southern part of the country. The virus killed 208 of 245 birds at the two locations, with the survivors destroyed to curb disease spread.The Netherlands reported two more outbreaks affecting a total of 55 wild birds, both of them in villages in Utrecht province in the central part of the country. One event began on Dec 17, and the other started on Jan 10.Romania reported four more outbreaks, three involving wild bird species, including whooper swans and mute swans found dead at nature parks, and one in backyard poultry. Three different provinces reported the wild-bird events: Constanta, Bacau, and Giurgiu. The poultry outbreak began on Jan 3 in a city in Prahova province.Slovakia reported two more outbreaks, one in Muscovy ducks at a zoo in Kosice, the biggest city in the eastern part of the country, and one in mute swans found dead in a pond near a village in Nitra region in the west. Both outbreaks started Jan 2, killing 4 of 341 susceptible ducks and 26 mute swans.Egypt, India also have more H5N8The H5N8 virus continued to hit poultry outside of Europe in regions that reported earlier outbreaks, according to new reports to the OIE.Egyptian officials said the virus was responsible for an outbreak in backyard birds in Sharqia governorate in the north that began on Dec 29, killing 89 of 190 susceptible ducks and chickens. According to the report, after the first outbreak was detected in late November, officials enhanced surveillance at 45 sites that are in the path of migratory wild birds.Meanwhile, India reported 23 more outbreaks to the OIE, all involving village poultry in Kerala state with start dates between Oct 19, 2016, and Nov 24, 2016. All told, the virus killed 66,571 of 714,090 susceptible birds, and authorities culled the remaining ones.India reported its first H5N8 outbreaks in early November, which also involved poultry in Kerala state.Taiwan continues to battle H5N2, H5N8Meanwhile, Taiwan’s agriculture ministry yesterday reported two more highly pathogenic H5N2 outbreaks, both on farms in Yunlin County, along with four more H5N8 outbreaks in poultry in different slaughterhouses, the OIE said in separate reports. The events are part of a series of outbreaks involving both strains that have been under way since early 2015.The H5N2 outbreaks struck farms housing ducks and native chickens, killing 1,066 of 3,738 susceptible birds. The remaining birds were culled, and authorities have stepped up surveillance at nearby farms for the next 3 months.Four slaughterhouse outbreaks involving the H5N8 strain began between Dec 17, 2016, and Jan 1, involving native chickens. Suspicious signs in poultry carcasses at three of the facilities triggered testing, which also revealed H5N2 in birds from one of the locations.The carcasses were destroyed, and the slaughterhouses were cleaned and disinfected.See also:Jan 12 OIE report on H5N8 in Ukrainian wild birdJan 12 OIE report on H5N8 in Ukrainian poultryJan 12 OIE report on H5N8 in PolandJan 12 OIE report on H5N8 in the NetherlandsJan 12 OIE report on H5N8 in RomaniaJan 12 OIE report on H5N8 in SlovakiaJan 12 OIE report on H5N8 in EgyptJan 12 OIE report on H5N8 in IndiaJan 12 OIE report on H5N2 in TaiwanJan 12 OIE report on H5N8 in Taiwanlast_img read more

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