first_img(READ the story in the Washington Post)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreAs China’s Li Na tossed the ball while serving at match point in the French Open final, a cry from a fan in the stands pierced the silence at Court Philippe Chatrier.Distracted, Li stopped and let the ball drop. The words of support were in Mandarin: “Jia you!” — which loosely translates to “Let’s go!” After so many years of “Come on” and “Allez” and “Vamos,” there’s a new language on the tennis landscape.Li became the first Chinese player, man or woman, to win a Grand Slam singles title.last_img read more

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first_imgVivian F. Broussard-Gates, 97, of Port Arthur, Texas peacefully passed away Saturday, June 27, 2020 at her home surrounded by her family.She was born November 17, 1922 in Abbeville, Louisiana to Armand Frederick and Suzanne LaVergne Frederick.Vivian had lived in this area for 67 years and was a member of Immaculate Conception Catholic Church of Groves.She was retired as Office Manager from the Jefferson County Tax Office at the Sub-Court House. Burial will follow in Greenlawn Memorial Park.Vivian was preceded in death by her first husband, Wilfred A. Broussard, second husband, Nelson W. Gates, brother, Joseph Haywood Frederick, sister, Una Palumbo and stepdaughters, Ginger Goates and Dale Simon.She is survived by her daughter, Linda Desormeaux and spouse Donald of Port Neches, sons, James W. Broussard of Port Arthur and Paul A. Broussard and spouse Denise of Fannett, step daughter, Maudine White and spouse Paul of Port Acres, step son, Gary Gates and spouse Cherry of Groves, grandchildren, Michael Desormeaux and spouse Anna, Donna Segura and spouse Leslie Rosson and Kevin Broussard and spouse Lindsay, five great grandchildren, seven great great grandchildren, twelve step grandchildren, and thirty four step great grandchildren. Vivian was a member of the Third Age Group and Bible Study Group from Immaculate Conception Catholic Church and D.A.W.N. (Divorced and Widowed Neighbors).She was an excellent seamstress and commercially made many prom and wedding dresses over the years.A visitation for family and friends will be Tuesday evening, June 30, 2020 at Levingston Funeral Home in Groves from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. with a rosary service to begin at 7:00 p.m.A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, July 1, 2020 at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church with Reverend J. C. Coon officiating.last_img read more

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first_imgShare on Facebook Pinterest Share on Twitter Share LinkedIncenter_img Email New research published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine — the first of its kind — has shed light on the biological effects of experiencing a BDSM interaction.The findings provide preliminary evidence that power exchanges between consensual partners result in measurable changes in biomarkers related to reward and stress.“When starting medicine, I already knew my interests lay in psychiatry and sexuality in particular,” said Elise Wuyts, a psychiatrist in training at the University of Antwerp and the corresponding author of the new study. “The opportunity to help lessen stigma surrounding BDSM, which is widely-practiced and yet poorly understood, was something I could not turn down. The fact that this kind of study had never been done before made it even more fascinating.”In the study, 35 BDSM couples recruited through the website FetLife visited a sex club, where they were instructed to “play” with their partner for 30 to 90 minutes. The participants provided blood samples immediately before, immediately after, and 15 minutes after their play session. A separate group of 27 individuals not involved in BDSM visited a sports club and also provided three blood samples.The blood samples were then analyzed to measure various hormone levels.The researchers found that levels of cortisol increased in submissive BDSM partners — but not dominant partners — as a result of the play. The findings “confirm our hypothesis that a BDSM interaction seems to elicit a stress response from the body,” the researchers said.Among dominant partners, engaging in more power play was associated with greater increases in endocannabinoid levels. In submissive partners, however, different levels of power play were not associated with differences in any of the hormones. But the presence of pain play was associated with higher levels the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol in submissive partners.“It is a clear indication that a BDSM interaction in general, and pain experience within this interaction specifically, elicits a biological pleasure response in the submissive party. Dominants, on the other hand, seem to derive more pleasure from the aspect of power play and the control they have over the submissive person,” the researchers explained.“Even though the idea of including power imbalances and pain in (sexual) intimacy is something many people struggle with, enjoying these practices has a biological basis and could for instance be compared to the pleasurable high that long-distance runners experience,” Wuyts told PsyPost.“Because this is a pilot study, it is only scratching the surface of what can be said about the biology of BDSM. This is only one study of one BDSM sample population in Belgium. It would be interesting to see if the results can be reproduced with other cultures or larger sample sizes.”“The study we’ve conducted on exploring the biology of BDSM still has a lot of data left unexplored, so we’re hopeful more interesting results will come from it,” Wuyts said.The study, “Between Pleasure and Pain: A Pilot Study on the Biological Mechanisms Associated With BDSM Interactions in Dominants and Submissives“, was authored by Elise Wuyts, Nele De Neef, Violette Coppens, Erik Fransen, Eline Schellens, Maarten Van Der Pol, and Manuel Morrens.last_img read more

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first_imgOur weekly wrap-up of antimicrobial stewardship & antimicrobial resistance scansStudy shows how tolerant bacteria enable the development of resistanceResearchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have uncovered an alternative method by which bacteria can become resistant to antibiotics.In a study published yesterday in Science, researchers describe in vitro experiments in which they exposed three different Escherichia coli strains to daily doses of ampicillin. They were looking to build on previous research that had shown that E coli populations, when exposed to intermittent daily doses of the drug, can develop mutations that extend their lag phase—a dormant period in which individual bacteria are maturing and not yet able to divide. This extended lag phase enabled the bacteria to tolerate intermittent exposure to ampicillin. But the tolerance would end once the bacteria started growing again.To understand how tolerance might relate to resistance, the researchers exposed the three E coli strains to ampicillin until the bacteria became resistant, isolated the first resistant clone established in each population, and then used whole-genome sequencing to understand how the resistance mutations evolved.What they found was that subpopulations of the bacteria first developed tolerance mutations, which enabled them to survive the daily doses of ampicillin until they developed resistance mutations. The researchers also found that resistance mutations developed more quickly on tolerant bacteria.”The reservoir of tolerant bacteria extends the window of opportunity for rarer mutations to occur,” the authors write. “In addition, we found that tolerance specifically enhances the establishment of resistance mutations by the epistasis between tolerance and partial resistance to the treatment.”The authors say that since clinical bacterial isolates are not tested for tolerance, the emergence of resistance preceded by the acquisition of tolerance might go undetected, and that testing for tolerance could affect the choice of antibiotics used against a pathogen. In addition, they suggest that the development of new antibiotics that target tolerant bacteria could help slow the development of resistance.Feb 9 Science study CPE on the rise in FranceThe number of enterobacterial isolates with decreased susceptibility to carbapenems doubled in France from 2012 to 2014 and the proportion of carbapenemase producers rose by more than 50% during that period, French researchers reported yesterday in Eurosurveillance.From January 2012 to December 2014, 6,682 enterobacterial isolates recovered from clinical and screening specimens in France and French overseas territories were tested for carbapenem activity at the French Associated National Reference Center for Antibiotic Resistance. Isolates with reduced susceptibility to at least one carbapenem (ertapenem, meropenem, or imipenem) were further evaluated for carbapenemase activity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing was used to identify the carbapenemase genes.The results of the testing showed 99% of the enterobacterial isolates were nonsusceptible to at least one carbapenem and that the number of isolates with decreased susceptibility rose from 1,485 in 2012 to 2,972 in 2014. The percentage of carbapenemase-producing enterobacteria (CPE) among those isolates rose from 23.1% in 2012 to 36.2% in 2014. The three main enterobacterial species with decreased susceptibility to carabapenems were Klebsiella pneumoniae, E coli, and Enterobacter spp.The number of carbapenemase producers in E coli was five times higher in 2014 compared with 2012, a finding the authors say “hints toward a possible future endemic spread of carbapenemase-producing E coli in the community.”PCR testing identified OXA-48 as the main carbapenemase type, with an increase in OXA-48 variants and NDM producers. The number of KPC producers decreased over the same period of time. The authors suggest the dissemination of OXA-48 is likely linked to population movement between North Africa, where the OXA-48 producers are endemic, and France. In addition, identification of NDM-producing isolates and OXA-48 variants was associated with travel to the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, North Africa, and tropical regions of Africa.”Although the origin of colonization with a CPE producer was not always documented, it is likely that acquisition abroad is fueling the growing number of CPE identified in France,” the authors wrote.”Based on our own experience and the results of this study, we advocate for a systematic screening of at-risk patients to identify carriers of CPE.”Feb 9 Eurosurveill report Pediatric emergency departments not involved in stewardship, study findsA new survey of children’s hospitals indicates that antimicrobial stewardship efforts in pediatric emergency departments (EDs) are limited.The cross-sectional survey included 37 children’s hospitals belonging to the Sharing Antimicrobial Reports for Pediatric Stewardship (SHARPS) collaborative, an effort to share best practices and relevant data for pediatric antimicrobial stewardship. Each hospital had two respondents: a hospital antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) leader, and an ED medical director. The survey items assessed antimicrobial stewardship activities and ED involvement in those activities. The overall response rate was 91.9%.The survey found that while the majority of ASP leaders (97.8%) and ED directors (93.7%) agreed that the creation of ED-based ASPs was necessary, pediatric emergency medicine specialists were rarely represented in ASPs. Of the 36 hospitals with ASPs, the ED was represented in only 3 (8.3%) and outpatient pediatricians in just 1 (2.8%). ED specialists were infrequently involved in the creation of clinical care guidelines, and no ASP monitored outpatient antibiotic prescribing for children discharged from the ED. In addition, efforts to improve ED provider prescribing, such as audit and feedback, were uncommon.The authors note that the findings are a particular concern given the fact that 250 million antibiotic prescriptions are written from hospital EDs each year, and at least 30% of those prescriptions are unnecessary.”Although ASP and ED leaders agree that implementation of antimicrobial stewardship in the ED setting is feasible and necessary, there is a clear lack of ED presence in pediatric hospital–based ASPs with respect to the creation of recommendations, prescription monitoring, and regulation of ED antibiotic prescribing,” they wrote.The survey results were published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.Feb 8 Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol study Study: Nurses can play a key role in nursing home stewardship effortsOriginally published by CIDRAP News Feb 9A study yesterday in the American Journal of Infection Control indicates that an online course on infection control can help nurses become more knowledgeable and more aware of their role as antibiotic stewards in nursing homes.The results are from a survey completed by 103 nurses before and after they took an online course comprising six 30-minute interactive modules on signs and symptoms of infection in older adults. The course was aimed at nurses working in infection control and long-term care settings. The surveys were designed to assess respondents’ knowledge about the care of nursing home residents with infections and their attitudes and beliefs regarding antibiotic stewardship.Matched surveys showed that after the respondents participated in the online course, the proportion of questions answered correctly on the 12-item knowledge assessment improved from 75% (9 out of 12 questions) to 86% (10.4 out of 12 questions). In addition, the results showed an increased agreement among the respondents that their awareness of a resident’s baseline status, their assessment of that status, and their communication with residents, families, and providers could influence whether a resident receives antibiotics.”Our results suggest that online education for RNs and LPNs about the principles of antimicrobial stewardship may be a viable component in multifaceted efforts to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use in the nursing home setting,” the authors write.According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 70% of nursing home residents receive one or more courses of antibiotics during a year. In October 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services finalized a rule that will require nursing homes to have antibiotic stewardship program. Feb 8 Am J Infect Control study Chinese study finds increasing rate of MCR-1 carriage in humansOriginally published by CIDRAP News Feb 8A new study out of China indicates that human fecal carriage of MCR-1-positive, multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae is on the rise.For the study, posted yesterday on the preprint server bioRxiv, Chinese investigators tested 8,022 human fecal samples collected from three hospitals in Guangdong from April 2011 through March 2016. They were looking for the presence of the MCR-1 gene, which was first identified in Escherichia coli samples from pigs, pork products, and humans in China in 2015.MCR-1 has since become a major health concern because it confers resistance to colistin, a last-resort antibiotic used in the treatment of multidrug-resistant infections. An additional concern is the co-existence of the gene, which is carried on mobile pieces of DNA called plasmids, with other resistance mechanisms.Of the 8,022 fecal samples, the investigators found that 497 (6.2%) were MCR-1 positive, and 182 (2.3%) were MCR-1 positive and resistant to cefotaxime, a broad-spectrum cephalosporin. From the fecal samples harboring MCR-1-positive/cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, the team identified 187 distinct Enterobacteriaceae isolates from 179 individuals. The vast majority of the isolates (173) were E coli.The rate of MCR-1 gastrointestinal carriage noted in the study is significantly higher than previous studies have found. The investigators also found that the MCR-1-positive and MCR-1-positive/cefotaxime-resistant samples increased significantly over the 5 years of the study, with a specific increase after January 2014. In addition, genetic analysis showed that the MCR-1 gene is spreading through a diverse set of genetic mechanisms (including strains, plasmids, and insertion sequences) that are helping contribute to its dissemination and could help facilitate its persistence.”Our genetic analyses suggest the rapid emergence of several major plasmid vectors of mcr-1 within numerous multidrug-resistant E. coli strains carried by humans, and highlight the significant degree of plasticity in these plasmid vectors harbouring mcr-1 over short periods of time,” the authors write.The study has not yet been peer-reviewed.Feb 8 bioRxiv abstract  Report notes high levels of highly resistant Acinetobacter in NepalOriginally published by CIDRAP News Feb 8Almost all isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii in Nepal were found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics, according to a small study yesterday in Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control.Nepalese researchers analyzed 44 isolates of A baumannii, an increasingly important pathogen. The found that 43 (98%) were resistant to carbapenems, an important tool for combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The same number of isolates were multidrug resistant, but all were susceptible to colistin. The bla-OXA-23 gene was detected in all of the isolates, while the New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) gene was identified in 6 (14%).The authors conclude, “Systemic network surveillance should be established for monitoring and controlling the spread of these resistant strains.”Feb 7 Antimicrob Resist Infect Control study Inappropriate antibiotic therapy tied to poor bacteremia outcomesOriginally published by CIDRAP News Feb 7A new study out of Denmark shows that inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy (EAT) in bacteremia patients is associated with an increased risk of recurrence and long-term mortality but has no impact on short-term mortality.The retrospective population-based cohort study, published yesterday in BMC Infectious Diseases, analyzed the data of 6,483 Danish patients diagnosed with incident bacteremia—the presence of bacteria in the bloodstream—in 2007-08, with follow-up of recurrence and vital status conducted through 2009. The investigators considered three different study outcomes: recurrence, 2-to-30-day mortality, and 31-to-365-day mortality.Because antibiotic treatment for bacteremia cannot await identification of the microorganisms causing the infection, clinicians have to initiate therapy on an empirical basis. EAT was defined as appropriate if given intravenously (except fluoroquinolones, metronidazole, and fluconazole) and if all blood isolates were susceptible to one or more of the antibiotics used. EAT was considered inappropriate if it did not fulfill these criteria, and it was considered unknown if the antibiotic treatment was unrecorded.Of the 6,483 patients, 3,778 (58%) received appropriate EAT, 1,290 (20%) received inappropriate EAT, and 1,415 (22%) had unknown EAT. Within 1 year of the initial episode, 712 patients (11%) had recurrent bacteremia. When compared with appropriate EAT, inappropriate EAT was independently associated with recurrence (hazard ratio, 1.25). The 2-to-31 day mortality was 15.1% in patients who received appropriate EAT and 17.4% in those who received inappropriate EAT, for an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 0.85. But 31-to-365 day mortality was 22.3% in patients given appropriate EAT compared with 30.7% in those given inappropriate EAT, for an adjusted OR of 1.35.”These findings have clinical importance and highlight the importance of vigilance in the identification and antibiotic treatment of bacteraemia,” the authors write. “Identification of patients and characteristics associated with inappropriate EAT may contribute to empirical prescribing guidelines and thereby improve EAT.”Feb 6 BMC Infect Dis studylast_img read more

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first_img Share Independent/Richard LewinOn December 11, it was East Hampton Town Chief Harbormaster Ed Michels’s turn to speak to the members of East Hampton Village Mayor Paul Rickenbach’s Tuesday Club. The Chief shared his enthusiasm for his responsibilities in boating safety, enforcement of town shell and fin fish laws, environmental protection, and navigation laws. He expressed his deep appreciation to East Hampton for allowing him the opportunity to serve.last_img

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first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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first_imgUK operator Dana Petroleum has detected a gas leak at its offshore unit in the North Sea.In a email sent to Offshore Energy Today on Friday, Dana said production was partially shut in on the Triton FPSO following identification of a gas leak on subsea gas lift infrastructure.According to BBC, the leak was identified on Thursday evening. The Dana spokesperson said the leak was isolated and made safe.“The FPSO is continuing to operate with reduced production with its normal crew of 60 on board. All regulatory authorities have been informed. Work is continuing to effect a long-term repair,” the spokesperson ended.The Triton FPSO is located in block 21/30 approximately 120 miles east of Aberdeen, and produces oil and gas from the Bittern, Clapham, Pict, Saxon, Guillemot West and North West fields.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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first_img Chris Torrance (retired), Bristol I have always enjoyed articles in the Gazette by James Morton, including a recent item about judges. I first saw Lord Goddard in the late 50s, while an articled clerk in London. I often dropped in to the Royal Courts of Justice for a bit of light relief from outdoor chores (stamping documents, issuing writs, visiting the Land Registry in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, etc, etc). I liked Goddard’s court because one could usually hear appeals against sentence which, particularly in his case, were very quickly dispatched. Although I sometimes found Goddard alarming, I never saw him pick his nose. However, he did provoke a favourable comment from an elderly lady watching the proceedings who, on Goddard dismissing an appeal, and in a voice not very sotto, said: ‘Oooh, isn’t he nice.’ Her friend nodded vigorously in agreement. Clearly the former must have been deaf, or she was speaking ironically. last_img read more

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first_imgNational firm Simpson Millar will launch a multi-platform advertising campaign this spring as it aims to move into the top level of UK consumer law firms.Its parent company, listed entity Fairpoint PLC, today announced the firm’s first ‘unified marketing campaign’ through a mixture of print and online media.In addition, the business will also make work-in-progress acquisitions from other firms and is considering ‘other commercial opportunities where it can deploy its core skill of applying process to professional services’.The marketing campaign has been developed in an attempt to push the Simpson Millar brand as attention turns to an ‘organic growth agenda’.Having bought Simpson Millar in June 2014, Fairpoint added personal injury specialist Colemans for an initial payment of £8.3m in cash in August 2015 and confirmed today it has retired the Colemans brand.According to financial results published today on the London Stock Exchange, the group’s legal services turnover increased by 165% for the full year ending 31 December 2015 to £31.6m. Pre-tax profit was £4.4m, up from £1.6m in 2014.Simpson Millar now has 12 offices across the UK with a focus on personal injury, family law and conveyancing, offering around 70 fixed-fee legal services.Fairpoint, which started as a debt recovery business, now draws 58% of its revenue from legal services, up from 31% in 2014.‘The consumer legal services market place is estimated to be worth some £10bn per annum and so presents the opportunity for both acquisition and organic growth in a much larger marketplace than traditional debt solutions,’ said the report.‘The legal services market is highly fragmented and has been subjected to significant regulatory change, which is intended to improve consumer choice and value. These changes are encouraging industry consolidation and present a unique opportunity to create more competitive consumer offerings.’The report noted potential future changes to the personal injury sector, with an increase in the small claims limit expected next year.This would affect around 8% of the group’s business, but the company is seemingly not concerned by the prospect of legislative change.‘The group believes that its recently acquired legal processing centre positions the group advantageously to manage such legal work at low cost. The board also believes that the changes proposed by the chancellor may provide interesting acquisition opportunities.’Fairpoint has proposed a final dividend of 4.35p, up from 4.10p in 2014. The share value dropped 5.52% following the announcement of the group’s results.last_img read more

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first_imgNINE years after European transport ministers gingerly opened the gate to liberalised rail services with the signing of Directive 91/440 in Luxembourg, open access entrepreneurs and companies with substantial rail business are starting to exploit the opportunities. As well they might, given that the International Union of Combined Road-Rail Transport Companies complained in May that a year’s survey of its services revealed that 40% arrive more than 30min late. UIRR President Werner Külper suggested at the organisation’s annual general meeting in Budapest at the end of May that not having locos or crew available for services that are booked well in advance is ‘clearly a management failing’.Given the national railways’ wish to retain control of path allocation, major users of rail services are pushing hard to break into the market by running their own trains with their own locos, or contracting with third parties for haulage. Swiss intermodal company and UIRR member Hupac is among those expanding independent operations; it plans to acquire three locos following the launch of a thrice-weekly open access service at the end of May between Köln and Roma. Hupac has arranged for German independent HGK to provide traction north of Mannheim – HGK acquired its first Class 145 electric loco on May 25, and put it into service four days later.For now the scale of open access operations remains tiny, but the new arrivals are keen and persistent. In Italy, several independent companies have lodged licence applications with the transport ministry. One is Rail Traction Co, which plans to launch two piggyback services a day each way between Verona and München this summer with a view to stepping up to eight round trips by 2002. RTC is owned by Autobrennero, Reset 2000 and Ferrotramviaria.In Denmark, Privatbanen Sønderjylland EuroRail and TGOJ this month begin hauling 10 trains a week between Padborg and Malmö for Intercontainer-Interfrigo, increasing to 20 by the end of the year. The two were awarded rights to run on the Banestyrelsen network last year (RG 1.00 p3). TGOJ last month agreed a £3m 10-year lease with HSBC Rail for two General Motors Class 66 locos. Due for delivery next month, they will have both Swedish and Danish ATP (p424), and could be followed by 30 or 40 more.ICF is rethinking its operational strategy and has already applied to join the open access ranks. It is now setting up InterRailServices GmbH in Berlin as a joint venture to start running services to and from the CIS in January 2001. A second venture called ICA Romania SRL will start to develop intermodal operations from Bucuresti.Attempts to demonstrate that there are better ways of running freight trains are increasingly common. As part of the Innovative Rail Intermodal Services (IRIS) project, Dürener Kreisbahn, Belgian National Railways’ freight division B Cargo, Düsseldorf Inland Port, Inter Ferry Boats and the Port of Zeebrugge sought to show in May how containers could be hauled economically between Düsseldorf and Zeebrugge. Promoter SCI Verkehr had hoped to use a CargoSprinter, but resorted to adding wagons to a conventional freight train. It was a challenging task, with traction and crew changes at border crossings and other obstacles dictating the rate of progress over a relatively short distance. The result was that the service was barely time competitive with barges, let alone lorries. A further IRIS demonstration is planned between Bologna and Padova on July 6 – 7, to show how to overcome what one participant called ‘the documentation nightmare’ of rail freight by providing an integrated communications service for all parties.As open access entrepreneurs nibble away at traditional markets, the national railways are seeking to promote the success of the first Trans-European Rail Freight Freeway launched between Muizen near Antwerpen, Sibelin (Lyon) and Gioia Tauro in southern Italy in January 1998. Known as Belifret, the Terff had by mid-May been used by 2000 trains typically loading to 750 tonnes; average Belifret haul is 600 km compared with the European average of 250 km.But one moderately successful Terff is not much of an achievement in more than two years. We predict that independents such as Switzerland’s Mittelthurgau Railway (p439), HGK and TGOJ are here to stay. If they can use flexible working practices, slick operations and keen marketing to break the mould currently hindering European rail freight, they will have done a great service to the continent’s industries.last_img read more

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