first_imgMOST READ EDITORS’ PICK Senators to proceed with review of VFA Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Memphis Grizzlies’ Mike Conley. AFP/GETTY IMAGES FILE PHOTOLOS ANGELES—Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley faces up to two months on the sidelines after suffering a fracture in his lower back, reports said Tuesday.Conley suffered the injury, described as a transverse process fracture, during the Grizzlies’ defeat to the Charlotte Hornets on Monday.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND View comments Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Reports said Conley would be re-evaluated before January 1 although the typical recovery time for the injury was put at six to eight weeks.The injury is a blow to Memphis, who is a respectable 11-7 this season with Conley averaging a career-best 19.2 points and 5.7 assists per game.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliIt is the latest in a litany of injury problems to hit Conley, who has played all 82 regular-season games just once since entering the league in 2007.Last season he spent 26 games on the sidelines because of an injured left Achilles.center_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next READ: NBA: Grizzlies’ Conley out at least three weeksConley re-signed with the Grizzlies in July on what has been reported as the richest deal in NBA history, worth some $153 million (144 million euros) over six years.Conley joins another crucial Grizzlies player, Chandler Parsons on the sidelines. Parsons is battling a knee injury while longtime Grizzlies forward Zach Randolph has missed the last three games because of a family bereavement.ADVERTISEMENT Tiger Woods counts it a success that he’s playing golf again As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise PH among economies most vulnerable to virus We are young Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol townlast_img read more

Posted in orcpgudc

first_imgClimate Change, Conservation, Conservation and Religion, Indigenous Peoples, Rainforests, Religions, Saving Rainforests, United Nations Religious leaders joined forces with indigenous peoples from Brazil, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Meso-America and Peru at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo in 2017 to launch the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative (IRI).The IRI plans to mobilize high profile religious leaders to intervene in policy forums and advocate for forests and indigenous people with support from UN Environment.It has been estimated that one third of climate change mitigation is from tropical rainforests and securing land rights for indigenous peoples is an effective and low-cost method of reducing carbon emissions. What if the moral and spiritual influence of the world’s religious communities and their leaders were directed towards protecting rainforests and their indigenous guardians? Is this an appropriate role for religious and faith-based communities to take on?  The coalition of religious and indigenous leaders behind the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative believe it is.Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, and Taoist religious leaders joined forces with indigenous peoples from Brazil, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Meso-America and Peru at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo in 2017 to launch the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative (IRI) and are committed to mobilizing billions of people of faith to stand up for rainforests and their protectors. The IRI global steering committee reconvened at the UN Headquarters in New York on April 19, 2018 to give a briefing on this initiative and to receive consultation.“We are here tonight at this stage to listen,” said Reverend Fletcher Harper a writer, preacher and executive director of Green Faith as he addressed the diverse group of indigenous leaders and other attendees in New York. “There is a great deal of historical inertia from which we must overcome and much blindness from which we must repent and for which we will need your help,” said Rev. Harper. “We are here to listen. We are in your debt. We hope to be worthy of your partnership.”Panel Speakers at the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative Briefing and Consultation, UN Headquarters New York. Pictured Front (left to right): Dr. Kusumita Pedersen, Professor Emerita of Religious Studies at St. Francis College, New York; Vicky Tauli-Corpuz, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; Charles McNeill, Senior Advisor on Forests & Climate, UN Environment; Ambassador Mae Ellen Steiner, Deputy Permanent Representative of Norway to the United Nations. Back: Rev. Fletcher Harper, Executive Director, GreenFaith. Photo courtesy of Interfaith Rainforest.Faith leaders as eminent as Pope Francis and faith communities have made contributions to environmental efforts in the past.  The creation of The Paris Agreement was aided by people of faith who organized, engaged in civil disobedience, and mobilized millions to sign petitions. Harper says faith communities and organizations including The Parliament of the World’s Religions, Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale University, The World Council of Churches, Religions for Peace, the Real Network and Green Faith are committed to bringing that same level of commitment to protecting forests and indigenous peoples.This protection cannot come soon enough. In 2016, nearly 4 people were murdered per week defending land from industries like mining, logging, and agribusiness — 40% of these deaths were indigenous people. For most indigenous people, land serves as the center of their spirituality, livelihood, and survival. And in the case of tropical forests much more is at stake—the health of the entire planet.It has been estimated that one third of climate change mitigation is from tropical rainforests and securing land rights for indigenous peoples is an effective and low-cost method of reducing carbon emissions. According to the World Resource Institute, securing these rights in Brazil, Colombia, and Bolivia, for example, would be the equivalent of removing between 9 and 12 million cars from the road for one year. In areas of the Amazon where indigenous people have land rights, deforestation is 2 to 3 times lower. However, less than 10% of indigenous people hold formal land rights to the forests they protect and inhabit, making it difficult to take any legal actions against those who would illegally or unethically exploit resources.Worldwide, IRI plans to mobilize high profile religious leaders to intervene in policy forums and advocate for forests and indigenous people with implementation support by UN Environment. IRI will also launch early programs in five high risk, high priority countries: Brazil, Colombia, Peru, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Indonesia. These programs will support the development of faith-based networks with diverse advisory councils which include local indigenous people.“Protecting tropical forests is not only a matter of the protection of nature but also about the protection of the cultures, languages, livelihoods and human diversity that thrive within these ecosystems,” said Reverend Harper. “The protection of forests is only done well when it is integrally connected to the protection of indigenous peoples and we wish to reaffirm our recognition of this as fundamental to what this initiative is about.”IRI steering committee member and Ambassador of Norway Mae Ellen Steiner acknowledged that governmental partners have a long way to go and have lots of inconsistencies, but, at least in the case of Norway, they are trying. Norway has invested heavily in IRI and has devoted almost US$3 billion over the past decade to support developing countries to reduce deforestation and forest degradation, and has committed to continuing substantial investments.During the question and comment portion of the New York briefing, indigenous leaders in the room echoed a shared ethos surrounding the sanctity of the forests, their centrality to their lives and expressed enthusiasm about working with IRI and its mission. However, concerns were raised about dealing with unsupportive governments, local industries and businesses.Leaders and representative of NGOs and advocacy groups (such as the Water Culture Institute and Rainforest Alliance) were eager to learn how they, as secular organizations, could help. The steering committee members were clear that atheists, humanists, and any person of ethical convictions had a place in dialogue and coalition building. The IRI members were also reminded and encouraged to include the voices of youth and women in the process.“I have heard from many indigenous people that our religions need to re-indigenize,” said Dr. Kusumita Pedersen, IRI steering committee member and Professor Emerita of Religious Studies at St. Francis College, New York, who has been part of the global interfaith movement for over thirty years.“What does this mean?” Dr. Pederson asked. “Within the philosophies, worldviews, and ethics – the deepest values and visions of the world’s religions – there are those elements that correspond to the indigenous spiritual traditions. The Pope’s encyclical Laudato Si states that all living beings have dignity, not merely human beings. Father Thomas Berry famously said the universe is not a collection of objects but a communion of subjects. All beings have a spirit, personhood and are worthy of respect. So, our traditions need to draw out from within themselves these elements, hold them up, and make them as strong as possible to help us to be effective in the work we are doing, in solidarity. This is the task before us in order to move hearts and minds. It is not always easy, but we must never give up.”A recording of the IRI Briefing and Consultation in its entirety is available here.View more features in Mongabay’s ongoing series on conservation and religion here.Banner image: Buddha statues in the Laotian rainforest at Wat Chom Si. Image by McKay Savage via Wikimedia Commons. CORRECTION: The original version of the story incorrectly stated the implementing agency for the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative was the United Nations Development Programme. The correct agency is UN Environment. Article published by Willie Shubertcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Posted in uzpxiwnm

first_imgFilha do Combu, a family-run chocolate factory in the Amazon makes tree-to-table organic chocolate and is an exception to this model.Using an agroforestry system, smallholder farms like Filha do Combu can now produce their own chocolate, which allows them to have more autonomy and control over their quality of life.When cocoa is grown within an agroforestry system, it helps preserve the forest by reducing erosion and the use of pesticides, as well as preserving biodiversity.However, there is still a lack of support from the public sector for these smallholder farmers. COMBU ISLAND, Brazil – It is rare to find someone who doesn’t like chocolate. When the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus gave cocoa its scientific name in 1753, he chose Theobroma cacao, which means “fruit of the gods.” Over time, in order to supply the world’s growing demand for the delicacy, cocoa seedlings were moved from their native Amazon forest to northeast Brazil, central America, Africa, and Asia.Though several of the top ten cocoa-producing nations are still in South America today, almost 70 percent of the cocoa seeds used to make chocolate are produced in West Africa.But in the backyard of a rustic house on stilts on Combu Island in the Brazilian Amazon forest, the fruits continue to flourish in their native environment. The house’s kitchen is the heart of Filha do Combu’s factory, a family business that harvests cocoa pods from their backyard and turns them into award-winning organic chocolate. The process is known as tree-to-bar.The business is run by a local woman, Izete dos Santos Costa, who is known to many by the nickname Dona Nena. Costa opened the small Amazonian chocolate factory in 2006. Since then it has caught the attention of renowned Brazilian chefs like Thiago Castanho and Alex Atala. Even Norway’s Crown Prince Haakon Magnus has visited to taste the product.last_img read more

Posted in taxswawl

first_imgBrazil’s environmental regulatory agency, Ibama, announced last Friday that it was denying French oil company Total license to drill for oil near the Amazon Reef.Greenpeace announced earlier this year that a team of scientists onboard one of the environmental group’s ships had documented a reef formation under one of Total’s drilling blocks, contradicting Total’s Environmental Impact Assessment, which stated that the closest reef formation was 8 kilometers away.In a statement about the rejection of the environmental licenses Total was seeking in order to begin drilling in the Foz do Amazonas Basin, Ibama president Suely Araújo said that there were “deep uncertainties related to the Individual Emergency Plan (PEI) of the enterprise, aggravated by the possibility of eventual oil leakage affecting the biogenic reefs present in the region and marine biodiversity more broadly.” Brazil’s environmental regulatory agency, Ibama, announced last Friday that it was denying French oil company Total license to drill for oil near the Amazon Reef.The reef system, discovered off the coast of Amapá state in northern Brazil in 2016, is known as the Amazon Reef because it lies in the turgid waters of the Atlantic Ocean close to the mouth of the Amazon River. The system of corals, sponges, and a colorful marine algae that resembles coral called rhodoliths extends from French Guiana to Brazil’s Maranhão State and encompasses 9,500 square kilometers (nearly 3,700 square miles).Fabiano Thompson of Brazil’s Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, who was part of the team of scientists that made the discovery, told Mongabay at the time that the oceanographic conditions of the Amazon Reef are not found anywhere else on the planet, making it an entirely unique ecosystem.Total sought to drill for oil in the Foz do Amazonas Basin, which has been estimated to contain as much as 14 billion barrels of oil. The French oil giant was leading a group of companies, including the UK’s BP and Brazil’s state-owned oil company Petrobras, that acquired the rights to five exploration blocks in the basin in a 2013 auction. BP is reportedly still trying to secure a license to drill in the Foz do Amazonas Basin on its own.One of the first images of the Amazon Reef taken from a submarine launched from the Greenpeace ship MY Esperanza. Photo: © Greenpeace.Greenpeace announced earlier this year that a team of scientists onboard one of the environmental group’s ships had documented a reef formation under one of Total’s drilling blocks, contradicting Total’s Environmental Impact Assessment, which stated that the closest reef formation was 8 kilometers away.In a statement about the rejection of the environmental licenses Total was seeking in order to begin drilling in the Foz do Amazonas Basin, Ibama president Suely Araújo said that there were “deep uncertainties related to the Individual Emergency Plan (PEI) of the enterprise, aggravated by the possibility of eventual oil leakage affecting the biogenic reefs present in the region and marine biodiversity more broadly.”According to the statement, another factor that led to the license denial was the fact that many of the problems previously identified by Ibama in technical documents submitted by Total “were not remedied.” Ibama rejected Total’s environmental impact study for a third time in August 2017, for instance, because the company had failed to address concerns over potential impacts on marine mammals, sea turtles, and birds and had not improved its oil spill dispersion modeling or risk forecasting.Greenpeace, which published the first underwater photos of the Amazon Reef last year, welcomed the decision by Ibama. “This announcement is a stunning victory for people power, and further evidence that the age of oil is on its way out,” Thiago Almeida, Climate and Energy campaigner for Greenpeace Brazil, said in a statement. “More than two million Amazon Reef defenders from all around the world stood up against Total’s reckless plans to drill for oil near this unique and biologically significant area, and today Ibama did the right thing in denying Total its licence to drill.”You can listen to marine biologist and director of Greenpeace USA’s oceans campaigns John Hocevar talk about the discovery of the Amazon Reef and what it was like to be part of the expedition that photographed the reef for the first time in a June 2017 episode of the Mongabay Newscast.A brittle star (Ophiuroidea) collected at 185m deep during scientific expedition to the Amazon Reef undertaken by the Greenpeace ship Esperanza. Photo: © Marizilda Cruppe / Greenpeace. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Coral Reefs, Environment, Fossil Fuels, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Oil, Oil Drilling last_img read more

Posted in ahpxiwjb

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Captive Breeding, Commentary, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Extinction, Mammals, Megafauna, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife center_img The presence of near-extinct Sumatran rhinos in Indonesian Borneo was for a long time the stuff of legend, with no hard evidence to support it. Still, wildlife experts spared no effort to investigate every scrap of information.Those rumors eventually bore fruit with the capture of two individuals by conservationists in the past two years. The first rhino, however, died of injuries sustained before its capture.Today, a facility in eastern Borneo holds the other rhino, a female, with around-the-clock care from vets and experts, as part of a wider effort to kick-start a captive-breeding program.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. In 1982, an orangutan researcher working in Indonesian Borneo wrote to a colleague at the biology department at the National University in Jakarta. He told of meeting a traditional-medicine trader at the market in Pangkalan Bun, a city in Central Kalimantan province.“A whole Sumatran rhino head is immersed in coconut oil in a basin,” Muhammad Boang wrote. “That oil is later put into little finger-size bottles, and sold for 5,000 rupiah,” nearly $8 at the time. “It’s believed to cure various ailments. According to the trader, the rhino came from the forest in Tanjung Puting,” at the time a newly established national park.Three decades later, environmentalists from the Titian Foundation would once again get information of Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in Indonesian Borneo, this time in East Kalimantan province. In 2012, the foundation’s founder, Darmawan Liswanto, received reports of rhino sightings in the Mahakam Ulu foothills upstream of the Mahakam River. The area includes the Kelian Lestari protected forest, and was formerly a mining site spanning 67 square kilometers (26 square miles).The Indonesian part of Borneo island, known as Kalimantan, is shown in red. Image courtesy of Gunkarta/Wikimedia Commons.The presence of Sumatran rhinos in Indonesian Borneo was for a long time the stuff of legend, with no hard evidence to support it. The species was considered locally extinct, until WWF-Indonesia found signs of a rhino there in 2013.Early that year, an orangutan survey team from the NGO found fresh tracks believed to be from a rhino. The discovery prompted more intensive surveys, including setting up a camera trap and interviewing residents across West Kutai district, East Kalimantan province.The interviews indicated that there were pockets of potentially viable habitat for Sumatran rhinos in East Kalimantan. The surveyors identified these as Habitat Pockets 1, 2 and 3. Field surveys in Habitat Pockets 1 and 3 found signs of a rhino presence, including footprints, droppings, half-eaten vegetation, mangled branches, scuffed tree bark, and mud wallows. In mid-2013, a camera trap recorded a rhino in Habitat Pocket 1.On Oct. 2 that year, the forestry minister announced the rhino discovery at the Asian Rhino Range States Meeting taking place in Lampung, Sumatra. In 2014, a series of systematic and collaborative surveys were begun to uncover the rhinos’ population and distribution.In October 2014, locals reported finding rhino tracks in Habitat Pocket 3. The area was already under threat from human activity, including hunting, logging, clearing, burning, mining, and cultivation of oil palms.“The results of a 2015 survey by WWF-Indonesia and Mulawarman University indicate there are more than 15 Sumatran rhinos in Habitat Pocket 1,” Yuyun Kurniawan, from WWF-Indonesia, said in a Population and Habitat Viability Assessment (PHVA) presentation that year.Locals had also reported a rhino presence in Habitat Pocket 2 since 2013. But surveys by WWF-Indonesia and the Alliance for Forest Conservation (ALeRT) from 2016 to 2018 turned up no evidence of rhinos there.Since 2013, meanwhile, there were three rhinos known to live in Habitat Pocket 3, all females: Najaq, Pahu and Tenaik (Pahu’s calf). But conditions are increasingly dire for the rhinos there, surrounded by mines and oil palm plantations.Najaq was captured on March 12, 2016. She died on April 5, from wounds inflicted by a snare. There are no signs at present of Tenaik, believed to be about 5 years old. A Rhino Protection Unit (RPU) set up by WWF-Indonesia, the Indonesian Rhino Foundation (YABI) and the East Kalimantan conservation agency (BKSDA) found 250 snares and traps in a three-month period in 2016, set up to hunt wild boars and deer.Najaq before her death in April 2016. Image by Ari Wibowo/WWF-Indonesia.The morning of Nov. 25, 2018, was a memorable one for the Sumatran rhino conservation community. That was the day Pahu was successfully and safely captured. Three days later, she was transferred to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary (SRS) in Kelian Lestari.Wiratno, the conservation chief at the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, said the translocation was an important first step in the effort to boost conservation of the Sumatran rhino. He said the government was fully committed not just to the capture of rhinos for conservation and captive breeding, but also to the protection of their habitats.“Our hope is that the population of the species will recover,” he said.At the Kelian Lestari SRS, a team of veterinarians and experts are keeping close tabs on Pahu, ensuring she remains safe and healthy in her new environment.The Sumatran rhino is one of the mammals most at threat from extinction. With a population of fewer than 100 individuals, the species is at a critical point. For years it was hunted and saw its habitat destroyed. The population that remains is now scattered, making it difficult for individuals to find each other to mate.As a result of this prolonged isolation, the captive-breeding effort itself poses a risk to the fertility of the rhinos. Whether the species survives depends on the conservationists’ ability to capture and transfer the rhinos to facilities specially built for their care.The Kelian Lestari SRS where Pahu now lives features a high diversity of plants. These include plants whose leaves or fruit the rhinos like to eat, such as blackboard tree (Alstonia scholaris), Vitex pubescens, bandicoot berry (Leea indica), purple simpoh (Dillenia excelsa), native hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus), and different kinds of fig trees (Ficus spp).Any rhinos kept here will only be given food that can be found in the nearby forest. Additional food is limited to jackfruit (Artocarpus integra) or rubber fig (Ficus elastica) leave, which can be obtained from nearby villages. Even then, the SRS staff have to ensure that the leaves don’t come from farms or plantations that use pesticides. Rhinos become susceptible to disease if their diet isn’t diverse enough or is contaminated with pesticides.If, over the next year, conservationists are unable to capture and move any of the rhinos in Habitat Pocket 1 to the Kelian Lestari SRS, an important decision needs to be made. One of the males currently at the Way Kambas SRS in Lampung, Sumatra, must immediately be sent to Kelian Lestari to mate with Pahu. It’s important that this happen for the Sumatran rhino conservation program to work as hoped.Pahu was captured from a forest in East Kalimantan by conservationists in an effort to protect the near-extinct species. Image courtesy of Sugeng Hendratmo/Sumatran Rhino Rescue.Haerudin R. Sadjudin is a senior rhino researcher who has been involved in rhino conservation program for over 40 years in Indonesia.The story was first published on our Indonesian site on Dec. 2, 2018.Editor’s note: For an alternative view of the capture of Najaq, see this 2016 commentary by Erik Meijaard.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Posted in cnflqjnk

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Rainforest, Deforestation, Gold Mining, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Mapping, Monitoring, Protected Areas, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Technology, Tropical Forests, Wildtech A new study produced jointly by six Amazonian countries calls illegal mining in protected areas and indigenous territories of the Amazon rainforest “epidemic” due to its rapid expansion across the basin and lack of government planning to contain it.The report features an interactive map, produced from satellite imagery and a suite of experts and published materials, showing more than 2,300 mining sites and 30 rivers destroyed or contaminated by illegal mining activities.The vast majority of mining sites in the report were in Venezuela, followed by Brazil and Ecuador; the Madre de Dios department in southeastern Peru experienced the Amazon’s highest degradation caused by gold mining. Illegal mining has become an “epidemic” in the Amazon rainforest, destroying naturally protected areas and threatening indigenous territories, according to a new joint study by six Amazonian countries.The crux of the report is an interactive map that identifies at least 2,312 sites, 245 areas and 30 rivers affected by illegal mining across the Amazon. It was released by Amazon Geo-Referenced Socio-Environmental Information Network, known as RAISG, earlier this month.Initial damage from small-scale gold mining, adjacent to cleared forest along an Amazonian tributary. Mining strips the area bare, making restoration of abandoned mining sites difficult. Image by Sue Palminteri/Mongabay.Illegal mining “is expanding into a powerful driver of destruction and contamination of the Amazon,” reads the report’s English storyboard, released the same day. The report also includes videos and interviews of affected communities.While illegal mining in the Amazon has been a problem for decades, the new data shows levels that are “not comparable to any other period of its history,” the report reads.Environmental organizations from Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela contributed data, using various sources including satellite imagery, to map the mining sites. The research team also compiled data from experts, local communities, published news and scientific papers, and maps produced by government and civil society organizations.Screenshot of the scope of RAISG’s illegal mining map. Users can click on individual mines to learn about the location, types of minerals, contaminants, and other issues related to the site. Image from RAISG’s illegal mining website.Users of the map can click on a site to see information on the country, types of materials being mined, and the method or contaminants (such as mercury) used to access them. Where available, the map also provides the source of the information, as well as the mine’s social and environmental impacts, including deforestation, damage to conservation areas and loss of wildlife in rivers, forests and other natural ecosystems. RAISG will continue to update it as new data become available.Beto Ricardo, head of RAISG, stated in the report that researchers “have decided to make it an issue for continuous monitoring” and will update the map periodically, since it’s an issue that’s not well known or documented and poses a major threat to Amazon ecosystems.Close-up aerial view of a open-pit mine in the Amazon rainforest. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Of all the sites mapped, the vast majority of cases appeared in Venezuela, followed by Brazil and Ecuador. The Peruvian department of Madre de Dios is considered the area with the highest degradation caused by gold mining in the whole Amazon.According to researchers, major drivers of this illicit activity include the surging price of gold and the high global demand for other minerals, such as aluminum, iron, titanium, and niobium.The mercury used to separate the grit from gold is of particular concern for indigenous people, since the toxin leaks into local rivers, contaminating their water supply and the fish they consume.The expansive reach of illegal gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon affects rivers, surrounding forests, and the species that depending on them. This overhead view shows the Rio Huaypetue gold mine southeastern Peru. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.One of the communities most affected by this contamination from gold prospecting is the Aracacá community in the Yanomami territory, which stretches across Venezuela and Brazil. Researchers found that 92 percent of all hair and fish samples they collected from the community had high levels of mercury. In communities farther from mining, mercury levels were significantly lower.The report identifies 78 indigenous territories where illegal mining was taking place and affecting communities, the majority of which are located in Peru.Intact riparian vegetation along the Madre de Dios River in southeastern Peru. Image by Sue Palminteri/Mongabay.Researchers also pointed out that illegal mining often overlaps with areas where large-scale legal mining projects are underway.Salvador Quishpe, an indigenous leader and politician of Ecuador’s southern province of Zamora Chinchipe, noted in the report that the problem stemmed from lack of government planning. That means that “mining concessions are given anywhere,” and then anyone can start to look for gold.Small-scale gold mining along Peru’s Madre de Dios River. The miners scour the underwater substrate with high-powered water hoses, suck up the muddy mix, extract the gold from the sediment using mercury, and deposit piles of unwanted sediment along the sides of the river. The process dislodges the soil, disturbs animals living at the bottom, and releases chemicals and sediment into the water. Image by Sue Palminteri/Mongabay.“So, the biggest problem is the lack of any determination as to which area is for what,” he told researchers, adding a caveat. “Whether mining is legal or illegal is not the issue, because as far as contamination is concerned, we do not see any difference, the effects of pollution are the same.”Researchers have long called for better government coordination and monitoring of mining activities in the Amazon. But some environmentalists are skeptical this will happen, especially after Brazil’s recent election of the far-right wing Jair Bolsonaro, who has vowed to stop the protected demarcation of indigenous lands and end the system of fines imposed on companies that violate environmental laws.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Posted in kbqjkvwa

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Economics, Economy, Environment, Environmental Politics, Featured, Governance, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Health, Human-wildlife Conflict, National Parks, Nature And Health, Parks, Protected Areas, Public Health Article published by Jeremy Hance A new study finds that living near a protected area in the developing world decreases poverty and increases childhood health.Parks with tourism or multi-use were the best at delivering benefits to local populations.There is an untold part of this story: conflict with wildlife was not incorporated into the study. This post is part of Saving Life on Earth: Words on the Wild, a monthly column by Jeremy Hance, one of Mongabay’s original staff writers.center_img Citation: R. Naidoo, D. Gerkey, D. Hole, A. Pfaff, A. M. Ellis, C. D. Golden, D. Herrera, K. Johnson, M. Mulligan, T. H. Ricketts, B. Fisher. Evaluating the impacts of protected areas on human well-being across the developing world. Science Advances, 2019; 5 (4): eaav3006 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav3006 Imagine, for a moment, a world without national parks. Yellowstone National Park is just a combo of cattle ranchers and gated communities for rich people who like the empty views. The wild American bison is extinct and no wolves wander anywhere near the lower 48. Manú National Park, in the Peruvian Amazon, was logged out decades ago — and the indigenous tribes that inhabited the area are all dead. The migration across the Serengeti was slowly crushed by roads, trains, sprawl, agriculture and hunting; by the 1980s just a few wildebeest limped through churned-up plains. The Serengeti’s last lion died before the new millennium. Jim Corbett National Park in India is today just fields of marginal farming: the tigers that were once there are long gone — in fact, tigers in this counterfactual universe went totally extinct in the 1990s from the wild. But, hey, they still perform in circuses!Without national parks, and by extension all varieties of protected areas, our planet would be even hotter than it is and we would have lost thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands, of species still found on our Earth today. Protected areas remain our best tool against mass extinction and ecological degradation. They are also ridiculously beloved: a study in 2015 found that natural protected areas received 8 billion visits a year — greater than the total population of humans on Earth. The researchers estimate this could generate $600 billion dollars a year (even though globally nations only invest $10 billion a year into park management, which is pretty much woefully inadequate). According to the Protected Planet Report in 2018, 14.9 percent of global lands are protected, covering 20 million square kilometers (7.7 million square miles) — nearly twice the size of China.An elephant in Kruger National Park in South Africa. Photo by: Rhett Butler/MongabayYet what about the flip side of this coin? How do these protected areas economically impact those who live next to them, especially in developing and poorer countries? If thinking about it simply, one would likely believe protected areas drag down local economies — after all, the very purpose of such parks is to set aside large areas of land, essentially rendering them inaccessible in terms of direct economic exploitation.But it turns out the reverse is true: a new study in Science Advances, the largest and broadest of its kind, has found that protected areas provide both economic and health benefits to their adjacent populations.Benefits of living next doorThe study found that not only did protected areas provide economic benefits to local communities, but children living near protected areas were healthier as well. However, there was one caveat: protected areas either needed to have tourism or be designated as multiple-use protected areas, which means they allow some regulated access to natural resources inside the park.For those living near a nature reserve with tourism, wealth scores rose by nearly 17 percent and the likelihood of poverty plunged by 16 percent compared to rural households living nowhere near a park. Living near a park allowing multiple-use access and tourism translated into wealth scores jumping by 20 percent and the likelihood of poverty cut by 25 percent.Perhaps more surprisingly, these parks also impacted the health of children under 5 living nearby. Parks with tourism and multiple-use access increased height-for-age growth scores by almost 10 percent and reduced the likelihood of stunting due to poor nutrition by 13 percent.Such results aren’t super surprising if one has tracked this kind of research in the past: a study in 2011 had similar findings looking at parks in Thailand and Costa Rica.However, the new study has one thing past research doesn’t: it’s freaking huge. The researchers looked at a stunning 600-plus protected areas across 34 countries, analyzing data on 60,000 households and 87,000 children.A birdwatching guide in West Papua, Indonesia. Tourism can bring money into local communities and give an incentive to conservation. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay“This is much a much larger and more widespread set of data than has been used in the past to address this topic, and furthermore, our data were collected using the same methodology,” says Robin Naidoo, the lead author of the paper and a senior conservation scientist with WWF.He added that the study took several years of work because it required “[integrating] environmental and social data in a rigorous way.”Moreover, the study also found that even when protected areas didn’t have tourism or multiple–use access, they still didn’t harm local populations financially.“There was also no evidence for any negative impacts of protected areas on human well-being in any of our scenarios,” reads the paper.This means that, on average, there are no economic downside to parks — but Naidoo was quick to point out it doesn’t rule out that in particular instances a park could be economically harmful to locals.But why would parks deliver such sizable benefits? There are some theories. Tourism, for one thing, brings in direct economic benefits, jobs and often greater infrastructure and more local institutions. Multiple-use parks, meanwhile, allow some access (theoretically sustainable) to natural resources.Moreover, all protected areas have the potential for greater environmental health and ecosystem services spillover, meaning the nature protected inside the park will, of course, find its way outside the borders: cleaner water and air, flood buffers, access to plants and animal populations outside the park borders.But some say there’s another side to this.Unmeasured costs Earlier this month, a leopard in South Africa’s Kruger National Park scrambled over a fence and killed a toddler the child of a local ranger. Officials described such attacks as “rare,” but also killed the leopard as a precautionary measure.Our planet is nothing if not complicated and nuanced. And while Naidoo’s research shines a light on the potential benefits of living next to protected areas, not everyone sees it as a final word on the subject.A tiger snarls at tourists in the foreground at a park in India. Tigers can be incredibly difficult animals to live near. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Niki Rust, an environmental social scientist and consultant, says the study’s results are “basically meaningless” because they neglect one thing: wildlife conflict.“I don’t doubt that the scientists did a great job with the limited data they had available and I agree with their conclusions in that — with the data they used — it appears on first inspection that protected areas do not put the local communities living near them at a health or economic disadvantage. However, the data used completely misses the biggest costs of living next to protected areas,” she says.Living adjacent to wilderness can be dangerous and difficult. Wildlife conflict can include anything from the loss of life due to a tiger attack or lion, to crop raiding by monkeys and birds.“There is a dire need to integrate human-wildlife conflict data into these studies so as not to vastly misrepresent the true picture of what it’s like to live near a protected area,” Rust says. “We need to know the full cost of what it’s really like to live with dangerous animals like elephants, lions and crocodiles that can destroy livelihoods and lives. We have to collect data on the number of people killed or injured by wild animals, the amount of crops eaten by primates, the livestock killed by carnivores and the number of wells destroyed by elephants.”Rust adds that there are also the less-addressed costs of wildlife conflict — such as the fear and stress of living next to potentially killer predators or dangerous herbivores.“As with any study, ours has limitations,” says Drew Gerkey, a co-author of the paper and a professor of anthropology at Oregon State University’s College of Liberal Arts. “Certainly human-wildlife conflict is a very real, negative impact that local people around protected areas can experience. In an ideal world we would have had data for each protected area on the prevalence of such conflict, and this information could have been included in our statistical models in the same way as other variables. Unfortunately, these data simply don’t exist, and so that wasn’t possible.”Gerkey says there simply isn’t any “comprehensive data set” on human wildlife conflict or, he added, protected area governance, “which was something we had hoped to include in our analysis.”But he says he believes this lack of data doesn’t necessarily negate the paper’s findings, given that less poverty, increased wealth and better health outcomes for children would still be valid.Of course, it’s also important to remember that wildlife conflict is not equal everywhere. It can be particularly high in regions like sub-Saharan Africa — think elephants, lions, leopards, hippos, buffaloes, etc. — and parts of Asia — especially those areas with elephants and tigers — but may be minimal to nearly non-existent in other parts of the world. For example, protected areas in Latin America and the Middle East have considerably less wildlife conflict. In places like the Caribbean, such conflict could be said to be near zero, with feral pigs (non-native) and some birds the most likely nuisances.Naidoo says that every protected area in every region has particular situations that may cause “the story” to differ “from average impacts.” He adds that researchers should consider building up a library of “detailed case studies” to provide greater understanding.The research also shows that the structure and management of protected areas are vital. Everywhere, protected areas are largely underfunded and in some parts of the world amount to nothing more than paper parks. But investing in tourism brings real benefits to local people, as does creating parks with at least some areas that allow multiple use of natural resources.“We need to ensure the benefits of living with wildlife outweigh the costs,” says Rust, pointing to conservancies in Namibia as one example of how people can directly benefit, and manage, their own wildlife.A flock of macaws at a mineral lick in Manu National Park. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler/MongabayNaidoo, meanwhile, says their findings support the idea that protected areas actually deliver on two of the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals: wildlife conservation and poverty reduction.“We now have widespread evidence to suggest that it’s possible that these can in fact happen in concert,” he says.Researchers have argued for years that one of our strongest tools against both mass extinction and climate change are protected areas. Indeed, in the last few years a number of conservationists have called for Half Earth, the idea of setting aside half of the planet as various types of protected areas and indigenous areas to avoid mass extinction and ecological collapse.The naturalist and author Wallace Stegner called national parks America’s “best idea.” And while the U.S. did legally codify parks for a new age, the idea of “protected areas” actually has a long human history: indigenous tribes have long set aside areas of land as “sacred” or untouchable, allowing the protection of wildlife in these areas. In some ways, we’ve always had “protected areas.” And maybe that will be our salvation. It certainly was, even in all its complexity and challenges, one of humanity’s best ideas.last_img read more

Posted in ldobahmb

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored After decades of overall increase, Antarctica’s sea ice has been rapidly decreasing since 2014, according to a new study.Between 2014 and 2017, Antarctica suffered a precipitous decline, losing more yearly average sea ice in just three years than that observed in the Arctic over a period of 33 years.There was a small increase in the yearly average sea ice in Antarctica from 2017 to 2018, but there has been a decline in 2019 again. Whether the small uptick in 2018 is a blip in an otherwise long-term downward trend of Antarctic sea ice extent or the start of a rebound, is difficult to say, Claire Parkinson of NASA writes.Whether the changes are because of climate change or something else also remains to be seen, researchers say. For decades, sea ice in Antarctica has increased while that in the Arctic has declined drastically. But in a puzzling turn of events, Antarctic sea ice has been decreasing rapidly since 2014, a new study has found. Whether the changes are because of climate change or something else remains to be seen, study author Claire Parkinson of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center says.Parkinson, who analyzed satellite measurements of Antarctic sea ice over a 40-year period from 1979 to 2018, found that the yearly average sea ice extent peaked in 2014. But over the next three years, from 2014 to 2017, the sea ice extent hit its lowest average annual levels. Where the yearly average sea ice extent was a record-high at 12.8 million square kilometers (5 million square miles) in 2014, it reached 10.75 million square kilometers (4 million square miles) in 2017, with a record-low average monthly sea ice extent of 2.29 million square kilometers (0.88 million square miles) in February 2017.In fact, between 2014 and 2017, Antarctica suffered a precipitous decline, Parkinson writes, losing more yearly average sea ice in just three years than that observed in the Arctic over a period of 33 years.Is this downward trend going to continue? Researchers aren’t sure.“But it raises the question of why, and are we going to see some huge acceleration in the rate of decrease in the Arctic? Only the continued record will let us know,” Parkinson told the Guardian.Despite multiple hypotheses, researchers are yet to figure out why Antarctica’s sea ice extent has generally increased since 1979. The cause of the recent decline, too, is a mystery.The satellite measurements, for example, showed a small increase in the yearly average sea ice in Antarctica from 2017 to 2018, but there has been a decline in 2019 again. Whether the small uptick in 2018 is a blip in an otherwise long-term downward trend of Antarctic sea ice extent or the start of a rebound, is difficult to say, Parkinson writes in the paper. Moreover, even during the decades of overall increase in Antarctic sea ice, there have been periods of declines followed by an increase.“There was a period in the 1970s when the Antarctic also had a huge decrease in sea ice and then increased,” Parkinson told New Scientist. “So it could be this huge decrease over a few years [2014 to 2017] is going to reverse.”Parkinson had previously shown that the increases in Antarctic sea ice through 2014 did not compensate for the rapid loss of sea ice in the Arctic. This was because “the decreases in Arctic sea ice far exceed the increases in Antarctic sea ice,” she told NOAA Climate.gov in March this year.The Antarctic represents a complex system, and Parkinson says she hopes the 40-year satellite data will spur more research.“I hope that the 40-y record discussed in this paper will encourage further studies into the atmospheric and oceanic conditions that could have led to the extremely rapid 2014-2017 decline of the Antarctic sea ice cover, the comparably rapid decline in the mid-1970s, and the uneven but overall gradual increases in Antarctic sea ice coverage in the intervening decades,” she writes in the paper.Sea ice in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica. Image by Acaro via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Citation:Parkinson, C. L. (2019). A 40-y record reveals gradual Antarctic sea ice increases followed by decreases at rates far exceeding the rates seen in the Arctic. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201906556. doi:10.1073/pnas.1906556116center_img Climate, Climate Change, Climate Science, Environment, Global Warming, Research, Sea Ice last_img read more

Posted in awzhpora

first_imgAgriculture, Agroforestry, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Community Development, Indigenous Peoples Article published by Erik Hoffner The highly climate- and biodiversity-friendly agricultural practice of agroforestry is now practiced widely around the world, but its roots are deeply indigenous.Agroforestry is the practice of growing of trees, shrubs, herbs, and vegetables together in a group mimicking a forest, and its originators were indigenous peoples who realized that growing useful plants together created a system where each species benefited the others.Agroforestry is now estimated to cover one billion hectares globally and sequester over 45 gigatons of carbon from the atmosphere, a figure that grows annually.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Agroforestry, or forest gardening, is the practice of growing of trees, shrubs, herbs, and vegetables together in a group mimicking a forest, or within an existing forest, with each plant providing the others benefits like shade, protection from predators, life-giving humidity, and nutrients. A main group of practitioners of agroforestry are indigenous, and they often report that there is no phrase for it in their language; rather, it is often referred to, as with the Lenca people of Honduras, as “traditional technique.” It is best thought of as a technology, one that provides food, fuel, and marketable commodities like fiber crops, medicines, resins, and fruit in a harmonious natural system while providing a host of other benefits.Members of Cosagual Lenca womens’ cooperative in front of shade-grown coffee under pine trees on their traditional land in Honduras. Image by Monica Pelliccia for MongabayShade grown coffee and chocolate are the most recognizable examples of this indigenous technology that now covers over a billion hectares of land worldwide—roughly the size of Canada—and which is found nearly everywhere that trees grow, from wet regions to dry ones.Thousands of years of observing which useful plants and trees grow well together, planting the seeds of one under another, and creating an inviting ecosystem for seed dispersing animals has yielded bountiful agroforestry landscapes that look like natural forests and are enjoyed by all manner of creatures, both wild and cultivated.In Indonesia, agroforestry plots exhibit amazing biodiversity: “home gardens” there are a type of multi-layered agroforestry that are considered to have the highest biodiversity of any human-created ecosystem, containing 60 to 70 percent of the animal species found in the surrounding rainforests, according to one study.See related: Fire and agroforestry revive California indigenous groups’ traditionsIn Thailand, Prasert Tralkansuphakon, chair of Pgakenyaw Association for Sustainable Development and Inter Mountain People Education and Culture Association, explains that his Pgakenyaw (Karen) community manages land this way too. Agroforestry means ‘managed both by human and nature,’  or by humans in a natural way,” he says. “We make a living in three spaces: one is the space of residence, second is the space of farming and cultivation, and the third is a space of collecting food. Therefore, the concept of agroforestry produces both food and income in a traditional and innovative way, managed both by humans and nature, or [just] by humans, but in a natural way.”On the other side of the world, a Lenca community in Honduras has formed a women’s cooperative that is growing fair trade organic coffee under timber and fruit-bearing trees like mango, plantain, and jackfruit. “Agroforestry is a way to increase food security. The diversity of the crops allows an increase in production of fruit and vegetables [that] could be interchanged with the other members of the community, or [for sale] to the market,” Mongabay’s reporter was told.Antonella Cordone, senior technical specialist of indigenous peoples and tribal issues at the International Fund for Agricultural Development, believes the world must learn from such examples to create sustainable and integrated methods to manage agriculture and ecosystems in a multifunctional way. The approach her program has taken is based on appreciative inquiry, building on the skills and knowledge shared by indigenous agroforestry practitioners, and offering new ideas to bolster what they are already doing in an additive way. Cordone stated, “Specialists in modern agroforestry can help local communities to the extent they are able to listen to indigenous peoples and local communities and recognize that indigenous peoples’ knowledge is not inferior to formal science and technology.”Roger Leakey, an author and agroforestry expert, agrees. When he was director of research at the World Agroforestry Centre—the top international NGO studying and training communities in agroforestry techniques—rather than taking a prescriptive approach, the organization developed a highly successful method of “participatory domestication,” a bottom-up approach that consisted of engaging with communities from day one to grow the species that they felt were the most beneficial to them.Syed Ajijur Rahman, consultant at the Center for International Forestry Research in Bogor, Indonesia, agreed that in many ways, the communities know best: “The familiarity with their land, leading to careful selection  of sites for tree planting, together with good tree husbandry, results in high levels of tree establishment and growth rates.”Jim Kelly in the community of Bampu, Papua New Guinea, stands next to a young cacao tree within an agroforestry garden. Image by Camilo Mejia Giraldo for Mongabay.Such high productivity has obvious benefits for the communities who practice it. Because there is a great diversity of trees, shrubs, and annuals growing together, not only are yields increased by greater soil fertility and moisture, but a variety of crops are also produced, and on different time scales. For example, while the Lenca in the dry forests of the southeastern corner of Honduras are waiting for their coffee beans to ripen, they have many other fruits to harvest, such as plantains, which are fried and sold to local markets, or guamo, also called ice cream bean, which is eaten fresh. Or they can trade timber products for corn grown by another community nearby, one which practices an agroforestry technique named Quesungual, where coffee bushes are mixed with fruit trees pruned to a specific height that creates cool shade and moist soils under which maize and beans are also grown.The improved quality of the agroforestry shade grown coffee also creates big economic benefits for the Lenca women’s cooperative. Sixty-year-old Eva Alvarado is one of the founders of the cooperative and now its vice president, a role she confessed she never thought she would play in life. But the economics are more important to her than the empowerment, she told Mongabay’s reporter. “I paid for the education for all my kids, and now my six grandchildren. This is the third generation that benefits from the work of our cooperative,” she said.Indigenous communities around the world are not the only ones to benefit from agroforestry’s increases in food security and community resilience. Thanks to agroforestry,  all manner of wildlife are finding more homes in the branches of these food forests.See related: Agroforestry ‘home gardens’ build community resilience in southern EthiopiaA less tangible benefit also accrues to the global good: slowing climate change. The climate effects of creating food forests is chiefly noticeable on a local scale, especially dry ones like a community in El Salvador, where growers of shade grown cacao are benefiting from improving river levels and cooler air temperatures since their agroforestry system matured. In other hot, dry areas, such as Africa’s Sahel region, farmers practice agroforestry because crops grow better under trees than they do in the open; their shade becomes a refuge for livestock and people, and reduces the sometimes deadly soil surface temperatures that can kill annual crops. Plus, the tree roots work like hydraulic pumps, bringing water up from the deep, as much as 20 meters below the soil’s surface. This moisture becomes available to crops planted underneath the trees, such as maize, even when it’s not the rainy season.But the biggest climate benefit from indigenous agroforestry is the amount of carbon dioxide that is taken out of the atmosphere by agroforestry’s millions of square kilometers of trees, shrubs, palms, roots, veggies, and vines (not to mention the carbon captured in their richer soils). A recent study published in the journal Nature estimates that agroforestry captures .73 more gigatons of carbon every year from the air (in addition to the 45 gigatons a study published in the journal Nature estimates it to sequester).That is a lot, at a time of rising worldwide emissions; in 2017 carbon dioxide emissions increased approximately 2 percent, and almost a quarter of these emissions came from conventional agriculture and the conversion of forests and wetlands into farmland.A woman in southern Ethiopia peels enset to make a staple food, kocho bread. Image by Tesfa-Alem Tekle for Mongabay.The world would do well to follow the lead of indigenous technologists by planting more trees in agricultural land-scapes, and in useful combinations. Even growing trees in cattle pastures, a technique known as silvopasture, is shown to yield better forage for the animals while capturing carbon and providing fruit, medicines, and other useful products. Yet for Tralkansuphakon’s Pgakenyaw community, the reasons for practicing agroforestry are highly local and cultural, passed down from generation to generation. For them, agroforestry is based on a proverb: “Au hti k’ tau hti Auf kauj k’ tauz kauj,” which means, “Use water, care for the river; use land, care  for the forest.”Erik Hoffner is the editor of Mongabay’s ongoing series on agroforestry, view all the features here. This essay originally appeared here in the journal of indigenous peoples, Cultural Survival Quarterly, in September 2018.Banner image: Cherangani traditional healer Richard Kiplagat holds roots harvested in the forest. Chepkresmeywo, at right, is used to treat typhoid, and kasisit is said to treat sexually transmitted diseases. Image by Sophie Mbugua for Mongabay.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Posted in fofabvlic

first_imgOver the past decade there has been a rise in corporate zero-deforestation commitments, but very few companies have shown progress in meeting their goals of reducing deforestation in their supply chains by 2020.The Accountability Framework Initiative, launched by a group of 14 civil society organizations, is the latest tool to help companies make progress, and hold them accountable, on their zero-deforestation commitments.The Accountability Framework Initiative is expected to be especially important for markets like Europe, where demand for crops like soy has been linked to rising deforestation in places like the Brazilian Cerrado. In 2010, some 400 companies grouped under the Consumer Goods Forum agreed to the goal of achieving zero net deforestation by 2020 for the four commodities responsible for the majority of tropical deforestation: soy, palm oil, pulpwood and timber, and beef.Nearly a decade later, though, even as more companies have made similar pledges, “the results are sobering,” says Daan Wensing, program director for global landscapes at IDH-The Sustainable Trade Initiative. An analysis conducted by Climate Focus for the Prince of Wales’ International Sustainability Unit in 2018 concluded that, “there is no evidence that the rapidly increasing private-sector commitments have led to tangible reductions in deforestation.”Deforestation and conversion of native forestland from agricultural commodities is still on the rise, and as the self-imposed 2020 deadline draws nearer, the goal to reduce or even eliminate deforestation from supply chains will most certainly not be met.“We have only a year and a half to go until [the end of] 2020,” Wensing told Mongabay in an interview. “There needs to be way more urgency about how we move forward if we want to make real progress beyond 2020.”Illegal deforestation in the Awá Indigenous Reserve in Brazil’s Maranhâo state. Forests are illegally cleared by outsiders in preparation for cattle or crops. Image courtesy of Mário Vilela/FUNAI.‘Accountability loop’A recent report by Forest Trends found that of 865 companies identified as “the largest, most impactful, and/or most likely to have commitments,” fewer than 10 percent have actually committed to achieving zero deforestation for at least one commodity. Only one-third of those that have made such commitments have reported any progress.A new initiative, launched on June 12 in Utrecht, the Netherlands, by a coalition of civil society partners, aims to close the “accountability loop” that they say has prevented more than 500 companies from achieving progress to remove deforestation from their supply chains.“The Accountability Framework Initiative (AFI) is an attempt by the environmental community to provide a benchmark for the companies making these declarations of what a commitment ought to mean and how it can be implemented,” says David Cleary, director of global agriculture at The Nature Conservancy (TNC), one of the environmental NGOs that helped create the AFI. “Companies need these benchmarks to validate their commitments.”The Accountability Framework sets “common norms and guidance for establishing, implementing, and demonstrating progress on ethical supply chain commitments in agriculture and forestry.”Directed toward companies, it was developed to help make sure corporate commitments, activities, monitoring systems and reporting practices are in line with common and agreed-upon norms and best practices.“I don’t think companies can ignore when you have some of the biggest environmental organizations and human rights organization around the same table coming to an agreement on standards,” says Vanessa Jiménez, senior attorney at the Forest People’s Programme (FPP), who helped lead the human rights segment of the initiative.Munduruku children swimming in the Tapajós River in the heart of the Amazon. Protesters say that increasing development pressure by the bancada ruralista agribusiness lobby, which dominates Brazil’s congress and executive branch, has put the future of indigenous people across Brazil at risk. Image by Otávio Almeida/Greenpeace.From promises to actionWhile traceability of commodities was initially seen as a barrier to implementing corporate zero-deforestation commitments, various platforms now exist for commodity producers, consumers, investors and other organizations to monitor deforestation from commodities. These include Trase, an online supply-chain tracking tool developed by the Stockholm Environment Institute and Global Canopy, as well as the Global Forest Watch Pro platform announced in June and already used by more than 80 commodity-producing companies and organizations to monitor and track their commitments.Confusion over definitions and standards and a lack of accountability are widely seen as major reasons that zero-deforestation commitments have failed to deliver. One of the obstacles many companies encounter is finding a common definition of what a forest is, for example, and thus what constitutes deforestation. “Creating a common language, one that resonates better with companies, will make sustainability more accessible to businesses,” Wensing, whose organization was not involved in developing the AFI, says, adding, “I think the AFI will help in various ways.”Beyond just providing environmental standards, the AFI also brings on board human rights organizations like the FPP to draw up a set of ethical guidelines that look beyond traditional certification systems that have focused largely just on forests and native vegetation.“Zero-deforestation or no-conversion is … tremendously important, especially for climate change,” Jiménez says. “But that has to go together with respect for internationally recognized human rights. We know that some of the most vulnerable people [in these landscapes] are laborers and indigenous people.”The inclusion of human rights in the AFI is especially important in places like Brazil, where the new government is actively trying to dismantle legal protections for indigenous peoples.Industrial cultivation of soy on a Cerrado plantation. Image by Otto Ramos/Greenpeace.Zero deforestation for European marketThe AFI will also be key for Europe, where the debate around deforestation from agricultural commodities is heating up. Europe is an important market for forest-risk commodities such as soy and palm oil, making European demand one of the drivers of tropical deforestation.A recent report by IDH took stock of European imports of major agricultural commodities linked to deforestation. It found that while three-quarters of palm oil imported into Europe for consumption was responsibly produced, less than one-quarter of soy was.“Soy is an embedded product — you don’t see it,” Wensing says. “Consumers are hardly aware. The production of responsible soy far exceeds demand.”A large percentage of the soybeans that Europe imports comes from the Amazon and Cerrado regions in Brazil, two of the most active frontiers for deforestation in the world. In 2015, six European countries — Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway and the U.K. — signed up to the Amsterdam Declarations, pledging to ensure deforestation-free and sustainable agricultural commodities in their supply chains by 2020. But in 2017, 15 percent of the soy imports by these six countries came from the MATOPIBA region in the Brazilian Cerrado, which made up 82 percent of Europe’s deforestation risk, according to an analysis by Forest500.Many of the companies active in the Brazilian Cerrado have committed to various zero-deforestation and environmental sustainability commitments,  but continue to be linked to deforestation.“The focus is not on banging the drum and getting more companies to sign on [to zero-deforestation commitments],” says Cleary, “but rather get those companies to start implementing their policies.”Banner image of deforestation for soy production in the Bolivian Amazon and Chaco, by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by hayatcenter_img agribusiness, Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Cattle Pasture, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Responsibility, Corporate Social Responsibility, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Food, Forests, Industrial Agriculture, Land Use Change, Palm Oil, Rainforests, Soy, Supply Chain, Sustainable Forest Management, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation, Zero Deforestation Commitments last_img read more

Posted in ldobahmb